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Old 08-11-2014, 03:41 PM
 
854 posts, read 1,114,637 times
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Do you notice names that are common in certain states and less so in others? Looking at the top baby names in California from Social Security's stats I was surprised that a lot of 60s/70s/80s/90s names for girls still rank so high. I know that Hispanics and Asians often use names that have fallen out of favor among white people. I'd also imagine Latin/Spanish based names are more popular in states with a lot of Hispanics and Celtic/Irish names would be more popular in New England.

In the South you have a lot of double barreled names like Billy Bob and Mary Sue but I think this is probably more of an old fashioned thing, not so much now. Names like Hillary and Brittany for girls seem quite Southern to me, though, not that they aren't somewhat common in other regions as well.
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Old 08-11-2014, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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My name is Chad. It was very popular in the Midwest and Great Plains in the 70s.

Elsewhere, not as much.
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Old 08-11-2014, 05:41 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,972,432 times
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One thing about Pittsburgh that actually annoys me is the number of "Doms and Dons" who live in the area. They tend to be Italian and have massive chips on their shoulders. In fact, a great Italian yinzer name generator would have 'Dom' (typically short for Dominic) or 'Don' as the first name, or even 'Nick' as an accepted alternative, with the following criteria for creating the last name:


1. The first two letters have to be 'De-,' 'Di-,' "La-,' or just 'D' with an apostrophe immediately following it, in which case the apostrophe counts as the second letter.

2. The third letter has to be a capitalized consonant, except in the case of 'D' apostrophe, in which case it'd be a capitalized vowel.

3. The fourth letter has to be a vowel, unless the third letter is a capitalized vowel, in which case a consonant and a vowel have to be the fourth and fifth letters, respectively.

4. A vowel has to be the fourth-to-last letter.

5. The third- and second-to-last letters have to be double consonants.

6. The last letter has to be a vowel, preferably 'A,' 'I' or 'O.'


Voila! You've generated a new Italian yinzer name!
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:14 PM
 
854 posts, read 1,114,637 times
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Lmao on the Pittsburghese. Does anyone else notice any patterns?
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Old 08-12-2014, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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"Clay" is a male name I think I've only seen in the South.
Vincent/Vince/Vinny seems more common in the Northeast than elsewhere.
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:02 PM
 
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Mary was the most popular name for girls for over 50 years ( 1920-70, roughly).

Old-school boys names like Jim, Dave and Bob are not in vogue as much as they used to be..
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:12 PM
 
3,512 posts, read 4,965,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
One thing about Pittsburgh that actually annoys me is the number of "Doms and Dons" who live in the area. They tend to be Italian and have massive chips on their shoulders. In fact, a great Italian yinzer name generator would have 'Dom' (typically short for Dominic) or 'Don' as the first name, or even 'Nick' as an accepted alternative, with the following criteria for creating the last name:
Funny you should say that -- One of my favorite movies is called "Dominick and Eugene" - it's about 2 brothers who share an old house, one a garbageman, and the other a medical student. The scenery in it is real authentic Pittsburgh, with steep hills spanned by outdoor stairways, etc.

Dominick and Eugene - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Mary was the most popular name for girls for over 50 years ( 1920-70, roughly).

Old-school boys names like Jim, Dave and Bob are not in vogue as much as they used to be..
Actually, they're still pretty popular even for boys/young men. It's just that they're far more likely to go by James, David, and Robert, respectively.
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
"Clay" is a male name I think I've only seen in the South.
Vincent/Vince/Vinny seems more common in the Northeast than elsewhere.
My nephew's name is Clay. And yes, he's from Alabama.

Another one I've seen only in the South is Gage. Never even thought it was a name until I moved down here.
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Old 08-12-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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I think using surnames as first names is more a southern thing.
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