U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-14-2015, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Surprising that DC ranks lower than Seattle, Portland or Los Angeles.
The DC suburbs have the same % of pre-1940 housing stock as Charlotte. That's why I don't get the frequent comparisons to Long Island or New England.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-14-2015, 09:51 AM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,890,314 times
Reputation: 4221
It just goes to show how much construction fuels the economy of the "newer" metros. Without rapid population growth....those economies would become anemic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 09:59 AM
 
10,558 posts, read 13,127,017 times
Reputation: 6361
My house turns 100 this year. I love it and it's in almost perfect condition.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:21 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
New Geography breaks it down by core city and suburbs. Here are the oldest suburbs in the U.S. (% constructed before 1940).
If suburb = anywhere not in the city limits, which is what I think they're using, Boston will rank high for old suburban housing stock, as much of its pre-1940 neighborhoods (such as Cambridge, Somerville, Everett and Brookline) were never annexed into Boston proper. Philadelphia has less of that, since its city limits are much larger, there's no equivalent of Northeast Philadelphia in Boston and the equivalents of University City and maybe Northwest Philadelphia wouldn't be in Boston. But overall, the Boston metro still has older housing stock than Philadelphia. Perhaps because Philadelphia has more inner city decay it needed more new housing to make up for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If suburb = anywhere not in the city limits, which is what I think they're using, Boston will rank high for old suburban housing stock, as much of its pre-1940 neighborhoods (such as Cambridge, Somerville, Everett and Brookline) were never annexed into Boston proper. Philadelphia has less of that, since its city limits are much larger, there's no equivalent of Northeast Philadelphia in Boston and the equivalents of University City and maybe Northwest Philadelphia wouldn't be in Boston. But overall, the Boston metro still has older housing stock than Philadelphia. Perhaps because Philadelphia has more inner city decay it needed more new housing to make up for it.
I'd also guess it's because the Boston suburbs were settled earlier than the South Jersey suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,393,652 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'd also guess it's because the Boston suburbs were settled earlier than the South Jersey suburbs.

And I don't think there's anything really like Chester County around Boston-maybe near Worchester, not really sure.

NOVA feels very different than Philly/Boston suburbs to me but is similar to some places in Chester County I'd imagine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Here's median age of housing by state.

https://eyeonhousing.files.wordpress...year_built.jpg

New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island have the oldest housing in the nation. Not too many surprises here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:48 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
And I don't think there's anything really like Chester County around Boston-maybe near Worchester, not really sure.
Worcester County grew much slower than Chester County. Even excluding Worcester itself, the county only doubled in population rather than grew 3-4 times as Chester County did. And Worcester County isn't part of the Boston metro, Wilmington is part of the Philadelphia metro which might skew things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:49 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Here's median age of housing by state.

https://eyeonhousing.files.wordpress...year_built.jpg

New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island have the oldest housing in the nation. Not too many surprises here.
New Hampshire stands out as rather new. Boston exurbs?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2015, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
New Hampshire stands out as rather new. Boston exurbs?
Yes, that's what I was thinking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top