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Old 01-14-2015, 11:01 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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For comparison purposes, both France and Germany have less % pre-1940 housing stock than New York State or Massachusetts. New York 33%, Massachusetts 34%. France: 30%, Germany: 28%. Germany must have lost a lot of its old housing stock from World War II, but France likely escaped relatively unscathed. Ditto with Denmark, which is at 36%. At the low end, Spain has only 13% of pre-1945 housing, younger than most of the northern US, as it was mostly agarian then and urbanized recently. Table 2.4:

https://www.bmwfw.gv.at/Wirtschaftsp...union_2010.pdf

The numbers are for pre-1945 housing stock rather than 1940, but I assume housing construction from 1940-1945 was minimal.
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Old 01-14-2015, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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A lot of houses in France were destroyed during WWII.

Quote:
The total number of houses completely destroyed by the bombings was 432,000, and the number of partly destroyed houses was 890,000.
Bombing of France during World War II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Remember the scene in Saving Private Ryan where the French guy was begging the GIs to take his daughter? The town had been obliterated.
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Old 01-14-2015, 11:14 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
A lot of houses in France were destroyed during WWII.
30.0% of existing French housing is 9.9 million housing units. Adding 600,000 housing units destroyed by bombing (halfway between the completely and partly destroyed numbers), the % of pre-1945 housing stock would only increase to 31.3%.
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Old 01-14-2015, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
30.0% of existing French housing is 9.9 million housing units. Adding 600,000 housing units destroyed by bombing (halfway between the completely and partly destroyed numbers), the % of pre-1945 housing stock would only increase to 31.3%.
I suspect 1945 was when France kicked it into high gear commieblock-building mode. The commieblocks were built on top of the old communes.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:41 PM
 
Location: C-U metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
For comparison purposes, both France and Germany have less % pre-1940 housing stock than New York State or Massachusetts. New York 33%, Massachusetts 34%. France: 30%, Germany: 28%. Germany must have lost a lot of its old housing stock from World War II, but France likely escaped relatively unscathed. Ditto with Denmark, which is at 36%. At the low end, Spain has only 13% of pre-1945 housing, younger than most of the northern US, as it was mostly agarian then and urbanized recently. Table 2.4:

https://www.bmwfw.gv.at/Wirtschaftsp...union_2010.pdf

The numbers are for pre-1945 housing stock rather than 1940, but I assume housing construction from 1940-1945 was minimal.
You should realize that the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s leveled entire towns and civilian populations as Franco and his buddy A. Hitler practiced for WWII. Franco stayed out of the WWII because Spain's economy was in tatters from the Civil War and likely would have been knocked out first by the British.
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
And I don't think there's anything really like Chester County around Boston-maybe near Worchester, not really sure.

NOVA feels very different than Philly/Boston suburbs to me but is similar to some places in Chester County I'd imagine.
Here is a county breakdown for the metros going up the East Coast. This is for % homes built before 1940.

DC Metro

Frederick - 12.1%
Arlington - 9.6%
Alexandria - 8.6%
Calvert - 4.9%
PG County - 4.7%
Montgomery - 4.6%
Charles - 3.9%
Stafford - 1.9%
Prince William - 1.4%
Fairfax - 1.3%

Baltimore Metro

Carroll - 12.6%
Baltimore County - 8.7%
Queen Anne's County - 9.0%
Anne Arundel - 5.6%
Howard - 2.2%

Philadelphia Metro

Salem - 22.1%
Delaware - 21.9%
Montgomery - 18.6%
Camden - 17.8%
Chester - 14.6% (also has highest % of 2000-2009 construction)
New Castle - 12.2%
Burlington - 11.4%
Gloucester - 11.4%
Bucks - 9.8%

NYC Metro

Hudson - 36.7%
Westchester - 31.6%
Essex - 29.1%
Orange - 25.6%
Fairfield - 21.6%
Nassau - 21.1%
Bergen - 19.9%
Monmouth - 14.9%
Rockland - 12.8%
Middlesex - 10.6%
Suffolk - 10.1%

Boston Metro

Middlesex - 36.0%
Norfolk - 28.4%
Plymouth - 24.2%
Rockingham - 14.5%
Strafford - 22.4%

Last edited by BajanYankee; 01-15-2015 at 05:53 PM..
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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In Milton, MA, 45.2% of houses were built before 1940. I know people often like to compare many places to New England, but are there suburbs in any U.S. city (outside of the NYC area) that come close to this percentage?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qo7qDaJoKsc
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Tarrytown, NY (Sleepy Hollow) is 31.2%. Housing stock isn't quite as old as Milton's.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyGUld1ITCo
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Old 01-15-2015, 06:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
In Milton, MA, 45.2% of houses were built before 1940. I know people often like to compare many places to New England, but are there suburbs in any U.S. city (outside of the NYC area) that come close to this percentage?
Oak Park, IL is 65% pre 1940.
Rensselaer, NY is 45%
Burlingame, CA is 29% [much lower, but high for the western US]

Philadelphia must have some, don't know where to look.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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In case people are interested, here is a (slightly out-of-date) map of average Pittsburgh housing stock age by neighborhood.



In Pittsburgh, you can or the most part see the old residential core of the city very clearly. There are some exceptions though. North Oakland, the Strip District, Downtown, portions of the Hill District, and areas of the North Side (not labeled in this map, but Allegheny Center, Troy Hill, and Manchester) were originally of as old vintage as much of the "dark brown" core, but later infill (in some cases market rate, in others subsidized) has dragged the average age of housing higher than neighboring areas.

Here is housing age by municipality for all of Allegheny County.



Most Pittsburgh suburbs were built out in the 50s and 60s, as the map shows, with the main exceptions the newer, high-growth areas in the North Hills and by the airport, to the west of the city. You can see the pockets of older development along the rivers as well - in some cases as old or older than the City of Pittsburgh at large.

If people have any questions about particular areas, I'll try to answer them.
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