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Old 01-16-2015, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
In Milton, MA, 45.2% of houses were built before 1940. I know people often like to compare many places to New England, but are there suburbs in any U.S. city (outside of the NYC area) that come close to this percentage?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qo7qDaJoKsc
I have family in Milton, and they just sold a beautiful older (and HUGE) home for a cool couple Million-that will apparently be knocked down for new construction.

The buyers are apparently from India and paid cash.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Here is a county breakdown for the metros going up the East Coast. This is for % homes built before 1940.

DC Metro

Frederick - 12.1%
Arlington - 9.6%
Alexandria - 8.6%
Calvert - 4.9%
PG County - 4.7%
Montgomery - 4.6%
Charles - 3.9%
Stafford - 1.9%
Prince William - 1.4%
Fairfax - 1.3%

Baltimore Metro

Carroll - 12.6%
Baltimore County - 8.7%
Queen Anne's County - 9.0%
Anne Arundel - 5.6%
Howard - 2.2%

Philadelphia Metro

Salem - 22.1%
Delaware - 21.9%
Montgomery - 18.6%
Camden - 17.8%
Chester - 14.6% (also has highest % of 2000-2009 construction)
New Castle - 12.2%
Burlington - 11.4%
Gloucester - 11.4%
Bucks - 9.8%

NYC Metro

Hudson - 36.7%
Westchester - 31.6%
Essex - 29.1%
Orange - 25.6%
Fairfield - 21.6%
Nassau - 21.1%
Bergen - 19.9%
Monmouth - 14.9%
Rockland - 12.8%
Middlesex - 10.6%
Suffolk - 10.1%

Boston Metro

Middlesex - 36.0%
Norfolk - 28.4%
Plymouth - 24.2%
Rockingham - 14.5%
Strafford - 22.4%

Very interesting-the Philly and NYC regions appear very similar while DC and Boston regions are on opposite ends of the spectrum.

It may be worth noting that the NYC and Philadelphia regions had some of the first "suburbs" how we know them today in the country-the Levittowns.

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 01-16-2015 at 10:02 AM..
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
It may be worth noting that the NYC and Philadelphia region had some of the first "suburbs" how we know them today in the country-the Levittowns.
This is the mythology, but it just isn't true, unless by "suburb" you mean mass-produced ranch housing. Suburban municipalities with curvy streets began to be plotted in the late 19th century. And by the mid 1920s you see all of the elements of suburbia (house set back far from the street, low-slung design, driveways, and often attached garages) in full. Indeed, although in most metros there aren't too many neighborhoods with a vintage from 1925-1945, where these exist they generally share far more characteristics with the neighborhoods that followed them than the fully urban, or streetcar suburb, neighborhoods which preceded them.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
This is the mythology, but it just isn't true, unless by "suburb" you mean mass-produced ranch housing. Suburban municipalities with curvy streets began to be plotted in the late 19th century. And by the mid 1920s you see all of the elements of suburbia (house set back far from the street, low-slung design, driveways, and often attached garages) in full. Indeed, although in most metros there aren't too many neighborhoods with a vintage from 1925-1945, where these exist they generally share far more characteristics with the neighborhoods that followed them than the fully urban, or streetcar suburb, neighborhoods which preceded them.
That is kinda what I meant LOL. I know places like Narberth, PA/Wynnewood, PA or even Milton, MA or somewhere like Garden City, NY are technically "suburbs" but to me if they have a downtown and rail access into the larger downtown, they are not typical "suburbs" how most Americans think of the term-mass produced homes on streets that don't have sidewalks, any type of walkability or public transit.
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:00 AM
 
Location: The City
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Yes probably the mass produced sense

Levittowns came after 1940 - a lot of returning vets were lured to these

Levittown PA was a development that had many Fairless Steel workers historically - A huge now defunct US Steel facility in Bucks county nearly to Trenton

In the NYC and Philly comparison - Philly probably had more flight driving new homes post 1950 in the relative sense whereas NYC was driven more by housing an movement with a continued large influx of immigrants
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:02 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
That is kinda what I meant LOL. I know places like Narberth, PA/Wynnewood, PA are technically "suburbs" but to me if they have a downtown and rail access into the larger downtown, they are not typical "suburbs" how most Americans think of the term-mass produced homes on streets that don't have sidewalks.
Maybe, but a significant section of Nassau County is villages built along LIRR stations. None of the locals think of them anything but suburbs. What was unique about Levittown was it was built nowhere near a LIRR station and rather disconnected from older towns. Levittown, NY has sidewalks everywhere:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Le...ae3e61265d1a79
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Maybe, but a significant section of Nassau County is villages built along LIRR stations. None of the locals think of them anything but suburbs. What was unique about Levittown was it was built nowhere near a LIRR station and rather disconnected from older towns. Levittown, NY has sidewalks everywhere:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Le...ae3e61265d1a79
Agreed. I edited my post to specifically mention Garden City, NY with it's downtown and rail access into Manhattan. I don't think places like Garden City are what most Americans think of when they think of "suburbs", although I find places like that much much more preferable than the Levittowns.
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:07 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
In the NYC and Philly comparison - Philly probably had more flight driving new homes post 1950 in the relative sense whereas NYC was driven more by housing an movement with a continued large influx of immigrants
I think people from Levittown, NY were usually in overcrowded housing in Queens, often living with their parents. Most didn't work in Manhattan (those that did would prefer a town with LIRR access) but probably somewhere in Queens or Nassau. Those that left from "flight" often moved to other parts of the city in the 50s: whites leaving Brownsville often moved to Queens, which had a lot of postwar growth from being a city: only 31% of housing in Queens is pre-1940, on par with Boston suburbs (which includes places not typically thought as suburbs such as Cambridge).
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:08 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Agreed. I edited my post to specifically mention Garden City, NY with it's downtown and rail access into Manhattan. I don't think places like Garden City are what most Americans think of when they think of "suburbs", although I find places like that much much more preferable than the Levittowns.
Garden City has an old downtown but otherwise it's not that dense, probably less so than recent California suburbs. There was a thread on it:

Garden City, NY 11530: More Urban than Suburban?
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Here's Pre-1940 data for all 50 states. The average across the United States is 13.1%.

Massachusetts - 33.6%
New York - 32.7%
Rhode Island - 30.0%
Iowa - 26.7%
Vermont - 26.6%
Pennsylvania - 26.3%
Maine - 25.5%
Illinois - 22.1%
Nebraska - 21.9%
Connecticut - 21.6%
Ohio - 21.1%
New Hampshire - 20.6%
Wisconsin - 19.7%
South Dakota - 18.2%
New Jersey - 17.8%
Indiana - 17.8%
Minnesota - 17.0%
Kansas - 16.9%
West Virginia - 16.6%
North Dakota - 15.6%
Michigan - 15.5%
Montana - 15.0%
Missouri - 13.8%
National Average - 13.1%
Maryland - 12.4%
Oregon - 11.7%
Washington - 11.1%
Wyoming - 11.0%
Kentucky - 10.7%
California - 9.3%
Idaho - 9.3%
Delaware - 8.8%
Colorado - 8.3%
Oklahoma - 8.2%
Virginia - 7.6%
Utah - 7.6%
Louisiana - 6.9%
Tennessee - 6.3%
Alabama - 5.3%
North Carolina - 5.2%
New Mexico - 4.9%
South Carolina - 4.8%
Arkansas - 4.8%
Mississippi - 4.8%
Georgia - 4.5%
Texas - 3.9%
Hawaii - 3.2%
Florida - 2.3%
Alaska - 1.7%
Arizona - 1.7%
Nevada - 1.3%

Last edited by BajanYankee; 01-16-2015 at 11:36 AM..
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