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Old 08-14-2014, 03:43 PM
 
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There have been several threads about the geographic concentration of affluence in metro areas. Here I'm interested in the migration of "trails" of ethnic groups. Just as you'd find in hypothetical metro A, an affluent north side running into affluent suburbs, you may find say, an ethnic group moving westward across a metro area.

Here are some examples I can think of:

Chicago: Italians moved from Near West Side into western suburbs. Poles moved from Milwaukee Avenue in a northwesterly direction. African Americans went from South Side to southern suburbs.

Boston: Italians move to northern suburbs, Irish southward from South Boston to South Shore "Irish Riviera"

Cleveland: Jews, Italians and African Americans moved east, Slavic groups moved west.

Buffalo: Italians and Jews moved to northern suburbs, Poles to eastern suburbs

In most cases, it's pretty a linear directional movement, though Jews are sometimes an exception and shift direction as they became more affluent. For instance in Chicago, the western migration from Maxwell Street to Lawndale later became a northern shift towards Skokie and Highland Park. Similarly in Buffalo, I believe Jews started out on the east side.

New York is more complicated to detect given how much its white population was dominated by Jews and Italians so they went in many directions. It's pretty well known that people from Manhattan and the Bronx tended to go to Westchester and those from Brooklyn and Queens to Long Island.

The most evident one I can think of is Italians going from southwestern Brooklyn to Staten Island (and New Jersey after that). Probably few Italians who opt to leave Staten Island go to Long Island, for example.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 08-14-2014 at 04:17 PM..
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:47 PM
 
Location: The City
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For Philly would say its not cut and dry

A lot of Italians moved to S Jersey - some enclaves to Bucks and Western burbs

Jews that did migrate seemed to go NE (the mainline was Jewish before the migration) to Huntingdon Valley and Lower/Middle Bucks County

Irish moved further NE within the city in enclaves
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:08 PM
 
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In the Washington area, African Americans move mostly northward from the east side of Rock Creek Park into PG County. Jews are concentrated in northwest DC and Montgomery County. However so many of them are transplants that few would have started out in inner city neighborhoods in Washington (where did they start out?) There does seem to be a bit of a shift west over time though - Silver Spring used to be seen as the "Jewish" suburb in the 50s/60s and now they're almost certainly a higher percentage of the population in Chevy Chase and Bethesda.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Of course DC's Chinatown is tiny and few Asians in DC started out directly there. They seem a bit biased toward the Virginia side but are also sizable in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Toronto like Washington has a sizable older city but also saw a lot of postwar growth so there are many people here who didn't start out in the inner city. But compared to DC, there is a much larger "white ethnic" presence (and less African American obviously). Historically the western side of the city was more "ethnic" than the Anglo Canadian/Irish east side but that is less true today as nonwhite immigrants have moved in all directions. Some evident "trails" include:

A northward migration of Jews from their original enclave just west of downtown (around Spadina/Bathurst and College St.) centered along Bathurst St. into Forest Hill, North York and Thornhill.

A northwestern migration of Italians from the College St. Little Italy west of downtown and slightly west of the Jewish enclave, to a sort of Bensonhurst-type area I suppose at St. Clair Ave. and Dufferin St., north along Dufferin into North York and then northwesterly into Vaughan/Woodbridge and later King and Bolton.

A western migration of Poles and Ukrainians from Bathurst and Queen St. west to Parkdale and High Park, and then into the western suburbs of Etobicoke and Mississauga.

Chinatown has long been along Dundas west of the CBD but it shifted slightly westward with the construction of the present City Hall in the 1960s, to Dundas and Spadina. Although they're a large presence in that area, they didn't move much directly west or north of there. Rather, a new Chinatown (kind of like Sunset Park, Brooklyn, I suppose) emerged in the city's east end in the 70s. Then an new Chinese enclave developed northeast of there in Agincourt and spread into Markham. Lots of more affluent Chinese in Willowdale and Richmond Hill as well. Of course many of them directly settled in these suburban enclaves rather than downtown.

The city's Black community, which is mostly of Caribbean origin and started coming to Toronto in large numbers in the 60s and 70s, has a concentration in the city's northwest running from "Little Jamaica" (around Eglinton Ave. and Oakwood) have moved into Weston, Downsview and Rexdale, with more middle income Blacks moving into Brampton. In the city's east the pattern is more scattered though there are many directly east of the CBD in Regent Park and in parts of Scarborough, with a more middle income presence in the eastern suburbs of Ajax and Pickering.

There are also lots of South Asians in the GTA too, but they're a mostly recent group and few started out in the inner city to begin with.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 08-14-2014 at 05:20 PM..
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Of course DC's Chinatown is tiny and few Asians in DC started out directly there. They seem a bit biased toward the Virginia side but are also sizable in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Toronto like Washington has a sizable older city but also saw a lot of postwar growth so there are many people here who didn't start out in the inner city. But compared to DC, there is a much larger "white ethnic" presence (and less African American obviously). Historically the western side of the city was more "ethnic" than the Anglo Canadian/Irish east side but that is less true today as nonwhite immigrants have moved in all directions. Some evident "trails" include:

A northward migration of Jews from their original enclave just west of downtown (around Spadina/Bathurst and College St.) centered along Bathurst St. into Forest Hill, North York and Thornhill.

A northwestern migration of Italians from the College St. Little Italy west of downtown and slightly west of the Jewish enclave, to a sort of Bensonhurst-type area I suppose at St. Clair Ave. and Dufferin St., north along Dufferin into North York and then northwesterly into Vaughan/Woodbridge and later King and Bolton.

A western migration of Poles and Ukrainians from Bathurst and Queen St. west to Parkdale and High Park, and then into the western suburbs of Etobicoke and Mississauga.

Chinatown has long been along Dundas west of the CBD but it shifted slightly westward with the construction of the present City Hall in the 1960s, to Dundas and Spadina. Although they're a large presence in that area, they didn't move much directly west or north of there. Rather, a new Chinatown (kind of like Sunset Park, Brooklyn, I suppose) emerged in the city's east end in the 70s. Then an new Chinese enclave developed northeast of there in Agincourt and spread into Markham. Lots of more affluent Chinese in Willowdale and Richmond Hill as well. Of course many of them directly settled in these suburban enclaves rather than downtown.

The city's Black community, which is mostly of Caribbean origin and started coming to Toronto in large numbers in the 60s and 70s, has a concentration in the city's northwest running from "Little Jamaica" (around Eglinton Ave. and Oakwood) have moved into Weston, Downsview and Rexdale, with more middle income Blacks moving into Brampton. In the city's east the pattern is more scattered though there are many directly east of the CBD in Regent Park and in parts of Scarborough, with a more middle income presence in the eastern suburbs of Ajax and Pickering.

There are also lots of South Asians in the GTA too, but they're a mostly recent group and few started out in the inner city to begin with.
Alexandra Park is another neighborhood that had a concentration of Black residents, including those of African American descent. Alexandra Park, Toronto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:28 PM
 
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Yup. Even though Alex Park is pretty much buried in Chinatown. It's really only in the northwest where you see a big contiguous Black population presence. There's one in the east too but more broken up.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:36 PM
 
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Black communities, both African American and Caribbean, seem to have "trails" going from the Bronx into Yonkers/Mount Vernon and another one running from Brooklyn to southeastern Queens into parts of Long Island.

In terms of Jewish and Italian migration, I sense that Jews are relatively more likely to go to Westchester and Italians to Long Island (or Staten Island if that counts). For instance Italian Americans in Long Island outnumber those of Westchester by 4-1 and Long Island Jews outnumber Westchester Jews 2-1.

Though I think that may be a recent pattern: Italians have a long presence in Westchester and I get the sense that their presence is as much if not more due to their presence in industrial satellites like Yonkers rather than "suburbanization" from NYC per se. But perhaps I'm wrong and I'd be interested to hear others weigh in. Also I think the Jewish population went to Long Island in a bigger "spurt" in the 50s/60s while Westchester's growth was more gradual over time.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 08-14-2014 at 07:45 PM..
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Old 08-14-2014, 08:24 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Boston: Italians move to northern suburbs, Irish southward from South Boston to South Shore "Irish Riviera"
There was also a large Jewish migration to the western suburbs of Boston like Brookline, Newton, Weston, Wellesley, and Waltham. Basically along the I-90/Mass Pike corridor.
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:54 AM
 
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Yes, forgot about that one.
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Jews that did migrate seemed to go NE (the mainline was Jewish before the migration) to Huntingdon Valley and Lower/Middle Bucks County
I thought the Main Line was mostly WASP until after WWII.
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