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Old 08-14-2014, 04:38 PM
 
128 posts, read 168,760 times
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Are there any nice cities that are not flooded with transplants? I live in Seattle and I think that Seattle is a nice city but I have noticed that Seattle has become a city that is now full of transplants. I'm not saying that it's a good or bad thing. However, it got me wanting to know if there are any nice cities that are not full of transplants?

When I think of cities that are full of transplants I think of these cities.......

Washington, D.C.
New York City
Chicago
Atlanta
Minneapolis
Seattle
Denver
Boston
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Dallas
Austin
Miami
And many other cities

When I think of cities that might not have as many or too many transplants I think of these cities......

Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Cleveland
New Orleans
Memphis
St. Louis
Indianapolis
Baltimore
Omaha
Portland, Maine
Providence, Rhode Island
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,156,117 times
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That's a pretty accurate list, except I wouldn't say Minneapolis is full of transplants as much as the other cities you pointed out. From what I heard, Minneapolis is more provincial and insular, but I could be wrong.

Like you, I prefer provincial cities because of the unique identity and culture that is retained. Perhaps the MOST transplant oriented cities that you excluded from your list would be Phoenix, Charlotte, Raleigh, Columbus, Orlando and Las Vegas. Those cities are almost entirely made up of transplants. As a result, most people you meet are not "from" there, and you get culture clash, which is undesirable IMO. When culture clash occurs, the place doesn't quite have a unique identity and culture of its own. People are constantly moving in or moving out. Friends come and go a bit too much. The place is just transient; not settled and established.

Every city has some degree of transplants, of course. But some of them have retained their provincial identity. Examples include: Providence, Jacksonville, Wilmington, Hartford, Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, Syracuse, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans, Birmingham, Richmond, Memphis, Jackson, Detroit, Louisville, Milwaukee, etc. These are places in which only a few transplants come and go and there is a stronger sense of community cohesion.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:44 PM
 
128 posts, read 168,760 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
That's a pretty accurate list, except I wouldn't say Minneapolis is full of transplants as much as the other cities you pointed out. From what I heard, Minneapolis is more provincial and insular, but I could be wrong.

Like you, I prefer provincial cities because of the unique identity and culture that is retained. Perhaps the MOST transplant oriented cities that you excluded from your list would be Phoenix, Charlotte, Raleigh, Columbus, Orlando and Las Vegas. Those cities are almost entirely made up of transplants. As a result, most people you meet are not "from" there, and you get culture clash, which is undesirable IMO. When culture clash occurs, the place doesn't quite have a unique identity and culture of its own. People are constantly moving in or moving out. Friends come and go a bit too much. The place is just transient; not settled and established.

Every city has some degree of transplants, of course. But some of them have retained their provincial identity. Examples include: Providence, Jacksonville, Wilmington, Hartford, Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, Syracuse, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans, Birmingham, Richmond, Memphis, Jackson, Detroit, Louisville, Milwaukee, etc. These are places in which only a few transplants come and go and there is a stronger sense of community cohesion.
Thanks for the reply. Very well put!
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
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Go anywhere in CT and you'll find next to no transplants :-) lol
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:00 PM
 
29,966 posts, read 27,480,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
That's a pretty accurate list, except I wouldn't say Minneapolis is full of transplants as much as the other cities you pointed out. From what I heard, Minneapolis is more provincial and insular, but I could be wrong.

Like you, I prefer provincial cities because of the unique identity and culture that is retained. Perhaps the MOST transplant oriented cities that you excluded from your list would be Phoenix, Charlotte, Raleigh, Columbus, Orlando and Las Vegas. Those cities are almost entirely made up of transplants. As a result, most people you meet are not "from" there, and you get culture clash, which is undesirable IMO. When culture clash occurs, the place doesn't quite have a unique identity and culture of its own. People are constantly moving in or moving out. Friends come and go a bit too much. The place is just transient; not settled and established.

Every city has some degree of transplants, of course. But some of them have retained their provincial identity. Examples include: Providence, Jacksonville, Wilmington, Hartford, Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, Syracuse, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans, Birmingham, Richmond, Memphis, Jackson, Detroit, Louisville, Milwaukee, etc. These are places in which only a few transplants come and go and there is a stronger sense of community cohesion.
There are downsides to cities that haven't experienced an influx of transplants, too. It can be harder to break into circles due to more provincial, insular attitudes, and there can be a lack of dynamism which encourages creativity and innovation. A lot of slow-growth cities just seem to be treading water at this point because their moment in the sun came and went generations ago; sometimes lethargy and apathy set in as a result.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:40 PM
 
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Philly still is predominantly inhabited by Philly-area people (or if not, it feels that way). I view this as a good thing.
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Old 08-14-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA, from Boston
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Richmond is actually full of transplants now, speaking as one. It has changed the character of the city quite a bit, though I think for the better
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Old 08-14-2014, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,156,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There are downsides to cities that haven't experienced an influx of transplants, too. It can be harder to break into circles due to more provincial, insular attitudes, and there can be a lack of dynamism which encourages creativity and innovation. A lot of slow-growth cities just seem to be treading water at this point because their moment in the sun came and went generations ago; sometimes lethargy and apathy set in as a result.
True, but I highly doubt that all of these transplant cities are going to develop a strong unique identity of their own in the same way that that many of the rustbelt cities have. That's because of modern day communication and travel. Today's growing transplant cities all essentially have similar culture and vibe.
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Old 08-14-2014, 08:47 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Today's growing transplant cities all essentially have similar culture and vibe.
I'm going to have to disagree with you there. Seattle, Phoenix, Washington, DC, and Atlanta are all fast growing transplant heavy cities but they are very different culturally with very different vibes.
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Old 08-14-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Cold weather cities. Ones with harsh winters. Ones that no one wants to live in. Those are the cities with the most character and loyal residents.
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