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View Poll Results: What region has the best climate?
West 90 54.88%
Midwest 28 17.07%
South 24 14.63%
Northeast 22 13.41%
Voters: 164. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-29-2014, 11:51 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,511 posts, read 14,346,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
But fear not! You can still be enlightened; all you have to do is grasp the basic concepts that are being put forth to you....

The Coastal US South is the true subtropical paradise of the US. Summers in the coastal South have lots of epic thunderstorms that quench and cool the landscape during summer, bringing relief. Summer skies in the Coastal South always are partly cloudy with lots of fluffy clouds that can pass over the sun, also bringing relief. Giant, humongous subtropical trees, such as Live Oak, grow huge, and profusely in the South, and provide lots of shade. Build a home in the South that utilize such natural features, and you wont need A/C....

Any freezes that do occur overnight are always accompanied by 60F+ temps by afternoon. So you wont need Heat in the South....
Sounds great if you live in an old plantation house with ceiling fans keeping you cool while you sit on the veranda with your mint julep, don't forget to light the fire and heat the warming pans to ward of the chill when those temps do dip down at night.
Unfortunately in the real world most people can't take advantage of those things, they live in modern houses and work in modern buildings that aren't really comfortable without heat and air.
....and those cool afternoon summer showers are great for a few hours, maybe, then all the moisture they've dumped starts heating up and getting muggy as anything, it's a hot sticky mess. Have you actually spent time living and working, maybe raising a family in the south, or is this just some fantasy life you lead? I like the south, enjoyed my time living along the gulf coast, but it's not the breezy, balmy tropical paradise you make it out to be.
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,202,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Sounds great if you live in an old plantation house with ceiling fans keeping you cool while you sit on the veranda with your mint julep, don't forget to light the fire and heat the warming pans to ward of the chill when those temps do dip down at night.
Unfortunately in the real world most people can't take advantage of those things, they live in modern houses and work in modern buildings that aren't really comfortable without heat and air.
....and those cool afternoon summer showers are great for a few hours, maybe, then all the moisture they've dumped starts heating up and getting muggy as anything, it's a hot sticky mess. Have you actually spent time living and working, maybe raising a family in the south, or is this just some fantasy life you lead? I like the south, enjoyed my time living along the gulf coast, but it's not the breezy, balmy tropical paradise you make it out to be.
Your right, the Coastal South is not a breezy, balmy tropical paradise... its a breezy, balmy SUBtropical paradise. Like I said, if you build your house in a way that melds with the natural features of the environment, then A/C won't be needed; the same house-building principles are used by people in subtropical Asia, similar in climate to the Coastal South, and they are doing just fine without A/C as a result. The majority of winter days in the Coastal South are sunny, and are above 60F, commonly reaching the 70s, so you wont need a heating system, as the subtropical sun already does it for you.

The summer thunderstorms usually occur at the late afternoon, early evening hours, just when the sun is starting to lower in the sky. That allows for quenching relief, which then lasts into the night, as the sun isn't overhead. And the air-masses that cause Southern thunderstorms come from the tropics, which exhibit, strong, cool breezes that feel very comfortable.
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Old 08-30-2014, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Like I said, if you build your house in a way that melds with the natural features of the environment, then A/C won't be needed; the same house-building principles are used by people in subtropical Asia, similar in climate to the Coastal South, and they are doing just fine without A/C as a result.
Spend a lot of time with the locals in Southeast Asia, do ya? You seem to have a vast knowledge about their living standards, so I'm assuming that you either grew up there, or you travel there for months at a time each summer. Otherwise I can't for the life of me think of any other way you would have obtained the kind of firsthand knowledge you're relentlessly trying to convince everybody you have in this thread and in others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
The summer thunderstorms usually occur at the late afternoon, early evening hours, just when the sun is starting to lower in the sky. That allows for quenching relief, which then lasts into the night, as the sun isn't overhead. And the air-masses that cause Southern thunderstorms come from the tropics, which exhibit, strong, cool breezes that feel very comfortable.
Speaking of firsthand knowledge, I grew up in Houston, which I'm pretty sure is part of this supposed "subtropical paradise" you keep going on about, and I can tell you right now, with absolute, 100% certainty, that those afternoon thunderstorms almost ALWAYS occurred in early to mid afternoon, and the sun would usually ALWAYS come back out long before it was low in the sky... turning the entire city into a steaming, nasty, very hot and very uncomfortable sauna. Maybe once in a while they would last on into the night, but that was always the exception rather than the rule. And I've experienced life in Houston during the summer without a/c before, and it was one of the most HORRIBLE experiences I can remember. Even at night, when the humidity would max out in spite of some cooler nighttime temps.

Maybe in the "olden days" when Houston was a metro of only about 300K, before WW2 and before a/c was invented, people never knew any different and had no choice but to adapt to it, but there's a reason Houston, and other big Southern cities experienced a massive population boom after Willis Carrier (my hero) gave us the gift of modern air-conditioning. If the people of those times were happy living without a/c, then why did everybody start buying them up in a wild frenzy once they hit the market? I know that both of my grandparents, who lived in Houston before and after the advent of a/c, told me many, many times about how much better life became once a/c came along.

You see, most Americans, when given the choice, really don't want to live in 3rd world conditions. And sunbelt cities just weren't built to thrive and survive without air-conditioning. Simple as that. I know I'm just wasting my time explaining this to you, and you most likely will respond with some other wild notion about how the coastal South is a breezy coconut paradise that requires no a/c or heat to live in, with all kinds of delusional justifications for your line of reasoning... but I just can't help myself when I see you post these admittedly entertaining, but wildly inaccurate descriptions of a climate that I'm all too familiar with.

That is all. Carry on.
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,202,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Spend a lot of time with the locals in Southeast Asia, do ya? You seem to have a vast knowledge about their living standards, so I'm assuming that you either grew up there, or you travel there for months at a time each summer. Otherwise I can't for the life of me think of any other way you would have obtained the kind of firsthand knowledge you're relentlessly trying to convince everybody you have in this thread and in others.
Yep, I've traveled extensively to not only Southeast Asia, but also to South Africa, and Northern India, and the that was during their summers AND winters. So trust me when I say that the Coastal South is similar in climate to those regions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Speaking of firsthand knowledge, I grew up in Houston, which I'm pretty sure is part of this supposed "subtropical paradise" you keep going on about, and I can tell you right now, with absolute, 100% certainty, that those afternoon thunderstorms almost ALWAYS occurred in early to mid afternoon, and the sun would usually ALWAYS come back out long before it was low in the sky... turning the entire city into a steaming, nasty, very hot and very uncomfortable sauna. Maybe once in a while they would last on into the night, but that was always the exception rather than the rule. And I've experienced life in Houston during the summer without a/c before, and it was one of the most HORRIBLE experiences I can remember. Even at night, when the humidity would max out in spite of some cooler nighttime temps.

Maybe in the "olden days" when Houston was a metro of only about 300K, before WW2 and before a/c was invented, people never knew any different and had no choice but to adapt to it, but there's a reason Houston, and other big Southern cities experienced a massive population boom after Willis Carrier (my hero) gave us the gift of modern air-conditioning. If the people of those times were happy living without a/c, then why did everybody start buying them up in a wild frenzy once they hit the market? I know that both of my grandparents, who lived in Houston before and after the advent of a/c, told me many, many times about how much better life became once a/c came along.

You see, most Americans, when given the choice, really don't want to live in 3rd world conditions. And sunbelt cities just weren't built to thrive and survive without air-conditioning. Simple as that. I know I'm just wasting my time explaining this to you, and you most likely will respond with some other wild notion about how the coastal South is a breezy coconut paradise that requires no a/c or heat to live in, with all kinds of delusional justifications for your line of reasoning... but I just can't help myself when I see you post these admittedly entertaining, but wildly inaccurate descriptions of a climate that I'm all too familiar with.

That is all. Carry on.
The epic afternoon tropical-style thunderstorms, that you get nowhere else in this country but the South, quench the landscape, and come in strong with heavy breezes and rain that provide relief. The clouds hang on in the sky as the dissipate, and also, the air is rain-cooled, so the oppressiveness isn't as much, even when the sun comes out again. Usually, when a Southern thunderstorm ends, the sun isn't directly overhead, and instead, is lower in the sky, reducing any potential uncomfort. And though the humidity is highest at night, the temps are coolest, and the constant sea-breeze in the Coastal South (in Houston, they extend all the way to even the Woodlands) is active, feeling like a comfortable warm blanket.

Like I said, as long as you design your infrastructure in a way that you capture all the natural features of the subtropical environment, then living without A/C and Heat in the South will be a piece of cake. The problem is that the rigid Northern infrastructure/industrial ideals were forced on the South during Reconstruction, and, though advanced, was not well equipped for the subtropical environment in the South. Such mistakes don't make for an comfortable living experience in the South. The 9 to 5 working regime is just not good for the subtropical climate in the South; a better adaptation is a regime that includes the afternoon siesta, or a break from work during the hottest part of the day. It is a common feature in Latin countries, many of which have heat and humidity as, or even more, oppressive compared to the US South. The Spanish-style design is the European infrastructure type best suited to the climate of the South, which is expected as Spain is one of the warmest countries in Europe. If only southern cities like Houston had more of that infrastructure; maybe the sprawl would never have happened.

Last edited by Yn0hTnA; 08-30-2014 at 03:39 PM..
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,755,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
The epic afternoon tropical-style thunderstorms, that you get nowhere else in this country but the South, quench the landscape, and come in strong with heavy breezes and rain that provide relief. The clouds hang on in the sky as the dissipate, and also, the air is rain-cooled, so the oppressiveness isn't as much, even when the sun comes out again. Usually, when a Southern thunderstorm ends, the sun isn't directly overhead, and instead, is lower in the sky, reducing any potential uncomfort. And though the humidity is highest at night, the temps are coolest, and the constant sea-breeze in the Coastal South (in Houston, they extend all the way to even the Woodlands) is active, feeling like a comfortable warm blanket.

Like I said, as long as you design your infrastructure in a way that you capture all the natural features of the subtropical environment, then living without A/C and Heat in the South will be a piece of cake. The problem is that the rigid Northern infrastructure/industrial ideals were forced on the South during Reconstruction, and, though advanced, was not well equipped for the subtropical environment in the South. The 9 to 5 working regime is just not good for the subtropical climate in the South; a better adaptation is a regime that includes the afternoon siesta, or a break from work during the hottest part of the day. It is a common feature in Latin countries, many of which have heat and humidity as, or even more, oppressive compared to the US South. The Spanish ideal is the European infrastructure type best suited to the climate of the South. If only southern cities like Houston had more of that infrastructure; maybe the sprawl would never have happened.
And there it is. Wrong, wrong, WRONG on so many levels, but I won't waste my time correcting you yet again. You are obviously dead-set on remaining stuck in your delusions, so don't let any of us pee in your punch bowl with silly things like facts and the firsthand knowledge of having lived in the region you're referencing. At this point, I'm just enjoying the vicarious entertainment your posts are providing. Can't wait to see what you'll concoct next.
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Old 08-30-2014, 11:01 PM
 
3,280 posts, read 3,840,652 times
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West is the best. I lived in WY for many years and hope to return someday (a different city though), temps in the summer never got above 75 thanks to the breeze.

Even in the winter, it was cold, but it was a dry cold which was alright. It wasn't a bone chilling humid cold like in the Midwest.
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Old 08-31-2014, 07:30 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,202,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
And there it is. Wrong, wrong, WRONG on so many levels, but I won't waste my time correcting you yet again. You are obviously dead-set on remaining stuck in your delusions, so don't let any of us pee in your punch bowl with silly things like facts and the firsthand knowledge of having lived in the region you're referencing. At this point, I'm just enjoying the vicarious entertainment your posts are providing. Can't wait to see what you'll concoct next.
Now, now, lets not get worked up Bob. I am already aware of the fact that you've had first-hand experience in the subtropical paradise that is the Coastal US South, and, judging from your posts around this thread, it was uncomfortable for you, and wasn't your cup of tea. I understand that. But it doesn't give you the excuse to have your grey-tinted glasses on so tight as to disregard the obvious paradisaical elements of the Coastal US South climate.

In much the same way, there are plenty of people in Coastal California, who, believe it or not, actually despise the perpetual mildness, and sunshine of the climate, and desire to have the excitement given by a four-season climate, like that in the Northeast. They too are going to wear they grey-tinted glasses tight as they express their contempt for the California climate, but that doesn't mean that the climate lacks paradisaical elements.

And you forget the fact that I too had first-hand experience in the Coastal US South, as well as in North India, China, and Eastern South Africa, all of which have subtropical climates similar to the Coastal US South. So trust me when I say that the US South is the true subtropical paradise in the US, capturing the best features of the tropics, and the Mediterranean, and rolling it all into one epic climate.
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Old 08-31-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Now, now, lets not get worked up Bob. I am already aware of the fact that you've had first-hand experience in the subtropical paradise that is the Coastal US South, and, judging from your posts around this thread, it was uncomfortable for you, and wasn't your cup of tea. I understand that. But it doesn't give you the excuse to have your grey-tinted glasses on so tight as to disregard the obvious paradisaical elements of the Coastal US South climate.

In much the same way, there are plenty of people in Coastal California, who, believe it or not, actually despise the perpetual mildness, and sunshine of the climate, and desire to have the excitement given by a four-season climate, like that in the Northeast. They too are going to wear they grey-tinted glasses tight as they express their contempt for the California climate, but that doesn't mean that the climate lacks paradisaical elements.

And you forget the fact that I too had first-hand experience in the Coastal US South, as well as in North India, China, and Eastern South Africa, all of which have subtropical climates similar to the Coastal US South. So trust me when I say that the US South is the true subtropical paradise in the US, capturing the best features of the tropics, and the Mediterranean, and rolling it all into one epic climate.
Believe me, the only thing I'm "worked up" with is laughter. Keep it coming. I enjoy laughing.
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Old 08-31-2014, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Intermountain West. Lived in the South and the Upper Midwest and have spent a fair amount of time in the Northeast. Those areas all suck because of the humidity. I'll take the low humidity of the Colorado Front Range over living in steamy, soupy yuck any day.
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Old 08-31-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,202,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Believe me, the only thing I'm "worked up" with is laughter. Keep it coming. I enjoy laughing.
And you know what? I enjoy laughing to; it is good for the heart and soul, and eases the stress acquired from a busy day. This whole discussion was quite funny. But do you know what the funniest part was? It was your inability to grasp the simple concepts being put forth due to having your grey-tinted glasses on so tight.
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