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Old 08-21-2014, 07:54 AM
 
320 posts, read 474,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
It's not that simple. There are areas of south GA and the FL panhandle that are certainly "Old South", yet there are areas like Huntsville, AL and northwest AR that could be considered "New South".
Transplants are not moving to Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas or Kentucky in droves like they are in the rest of the south. These states are the bottom of the barrel southern states. Nobody is breaking their neck to move to these states.

 
Old 08-21-2014, 09:38 AM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,459,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
Transplants are not moving to Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas or Kentucky in droves like they are in the rest of the south. These states are the bottom of the barrel southern states. Nobody is breaking their neck to move to these states.
I think the point he was making is that "New South" is more so a characteristic of cities/metros as opposed to entire states. While there are a few states that have a much more widespread "New South" influence, this isn't true of most of them. Like he said, outside of Atlanta, nothing in Georgia is typically characterized as "New South." A metro like Huntsville, on the other hand, exhibits many "New South" characteristics: rapid growth, highly educated population, an abundance of tech jobs, etc. It's almost like the Deep South version of NOVA in miniature.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 10:35 AM
 
320 posts, read 474,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think the point he was making is that "New South" is more so a characteristic of cities/metros as opposed to entire states. While there are a few states that have a much more widespread "New South" influence, this isn't true of most of them. Like he said, outside of Atlanta, nothing in Georgia is typically characterized as "New South." A metro like Huntsville, on the other hand, exhibits many "New South" characteristics: rapid growth, highly educated population, an abundance of tech jobs, etc. It's almost like the Deep South version of NOVA in miniature.
I live in Georgia and Savannah,Macon and Augusta have plenty of transplants. When I lived in Mississippi that was not the case. I've seen way more "New South" in Georgia than Mississippi. Biloxi/Gulfport is a nice area but Savannah is more "New South." If somebody from Boston says "I'm moving to NWA." His friends will say "WTF is In Arkansas? Nobody wants to live In Arkansas... because it's Arkansas." However, if they say that they're moving to Virginia it's more acceptable because it's known as a "New South" state. Regardless of what cities are in it.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 10:54 AM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,459,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I live in Georgia and Savannah,Macon and Augusta have plenty of transplants.
Macon and Augusta? Come now, give me a break. Augusta mainly has them due to the military and is experiencing average growth (mostly in the suburbs; the city itself is stagnant) while Macon, in many ways, is stuck. Savannah is a different case but it's much more viewed as the Old South due to its history and built form.

Quote:
When I lived in Mississippi that was not the case. I've seen way more "New South" in Georgia than Mississippi. Biloxi/Gulfport is a nice area but Savannah is more "New South." If somebody from Boston says "I'm moving to NWA." His friends will say "WTF is In Arkansas? Nobody wants to live In Arkansas... because it's Arkansas."
A person's ignorance of what's going on in other metro areas isn't a qualifier, LOL. NW Arkansas is home to a nice collection of F500 companies, including the #1 retailer in the world, a large flagship university, and is experiencing very strong growth, stronger than Savannah, Augusta, and Macon. To take your example with respect to Augusta and Macon, someone from Boston will say "WTF is in Macon or Augusta? Nobody wants to live there."
 
Old 08-21-2014, 11:23 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,171,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I live in Georgia and Savannah,Macon and Augusta have plenty of transplants. When I lived in Mississippi that was not the case. I've seen way more "New South" in Georgia than Mississippi. Biloxi/Gulfport is a nice area but Savannah is more "New South." If somebody from Boston says "I'm moving to NWA." His friends will say "WTF is In Arkansas? Nobody wants to live In Arkansas... because it's Arkansas." However, if they say that they're moving to Virginia it's more acceptable because it's known as a "New South" state. Regardless of what cities are in it.
Savannah has an edge but Fayetteville and Little Rock are more New South than Macon or Augusta. The only reason Augusta has a lot of people from elsewhere is because of the military. Outside of that you have a run down typically southern city.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 12:15 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,271 posts, read 6,361,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Typically, these days the term refers to cities that have experienced post-war population and economic booms, along with all the sprawl that's come with it like Atlanta, the Texas cities, Charlotte, Raleigh, Nashville, Orlando, etc. Cities that have largely transitioned to service-based economies, but with more urban built forms within their cores and slower population growth rates, like Richmond, Birmingham, New Orleans, Memphis, and Louisville, aren't really considered "New South" cities.
^^This is correct, and how most people outside the South define the areas of the New South.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 12:19 PM
 
320 posts, read 474,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Savannah has an edge but Fayetteville and Little Rock are more New South than Macon or Augusta. The only reason Augusta has a lot of people from elsewhere is because of the military. Outside of that you have a run down typically southern city.
Nobody (outside of Arkansas) wants to live in Little Rock. It's got a crime/gang image that Macon and Augusta don't have. I'm from Little Rock.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 12:28 PM
 
320 posts, read 474,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Macon and Augusta? Come now, give me a break. Augusta mainly has them due to the military and is experiencing average growth (mostly in the suburbs; the city itself is stagnant) while Macon, in many ways, is stuck. Savannah is a different case but it's much more viewed as the Old South due to its history and built form.

Georgia as a whole Is the New South based on the popularity of ATL. At the end of several tv shows there is logo that says Georgia. No other southern state has that.



A person's ignorance of what's going on in other metro areas isn't a qualifier, LOL. NW Arkansas is home to a nice collection of F500 companies, including the #1 retailer in the world, a large flagship university, and is experiencing very strong growth, stronger than Savannah, Augusta, and Macon. To take your example with respect to Augusta and Macon, someone from Boston will say "WTF is in Macon or Augusta? Nobody wants to live there."
Georgia as a whole is the New South based on the popularity of ATL. At the end of many tv shows there is a logo that says Georgia. No other Southern state has that. No way NWA or Arkansas are on the same level as Georgia.

Last edited by SawBoi; 08-21-2014 at 12:47 PM..
 
Old 08-21-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,171,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
Nobody (outside of Arkansas) wants to live in Little Rock. It's got a crime/gang image that Macon and Augusta don't have. I'm from Little Rock.
It's not so much an issue of where people want to live as it is what opportunities are available, and Littld Rock simply has more. The only advantage Augusta has is its proximity to much more advanced cities.
 
Old 08-21-2014, 12:44 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,203,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Texas isn't really considered part of the "South" in my opinion. It strives to maintain it's own separatist identity and geographically is more "Southwest", as it's west of the east/west divide if you look at a map.
We could all go back and forth on this subject alone (it's already happened several times in this forum), but just for this thread, let's call Texas "the south". And pretty much any city in Texas east of Abilene could be called "New South".
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