U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 08-22-2014, 08:39 AM
 
320 posts, read 474,788 times
Reputation: 294

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post

Very funny

 
Old 08-22-2014, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,424 posts, read 16,994,819 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by po-boy View Post
As others have said, "New South" was a term originally used shortly after the Civil War to try to describe certain areas of the South that were more progressive, business friendly, and often industrial/manufacturing oriented. The term was meant to distinguish them from the old, antebellum South. Atlanta and Birmingham were two of the major New South cities.

As times changed, the importance of industry and manufacturing has declined. So these days when people say New South they tend to refer to the growing cities and metros that are in general growing, have a higher average educational attainment, are generally a bit more progressive and have an economy more focused on professional services and high tech. The poster children are places like Charlotte, Atlanta, Nashville, Raleigh, as well as some smaller cities like Huntsville. Some people include Texas cities like Austin and Houston. Places with a more historical nature (New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah) also often have many of the same characteristics, but are often excluded from term "New South" b/c part of their appeal lies in their historical, old south character.
Well, you're right that Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans were never part of the "New South" ... and for that, you can be grateful. Had these cities been as progressive, pro-business, and industrial as Atlanta, no doubt much of their historic charm and history would have been loss. Indeed, Savannah's saving grace (ironical enough) was probably the arrival of the boll weevil and collapse of the cotton industry just as the depression set in. The city's riverfront and the old cotton warehouses were abandoned and left to rot. Homes and buildings in the heart of the city fell into disrepair. Urban renewal was a late arrival to Savannah and was the catalyst for starting historic preservation. Thank goodness!
 
Old 08-23-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,100 posts, read 36,318,714 times
Reputation: 63823
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Texas isn't really considered part of the "South" in my opinion. It strives to maintain it's own separatist identity and geographically is more "Southwest", as it's west of the east/west divide if you look at a map.
Really? Many east Texans (half the state - and the half with the most people) would heartily disagree with you on that point.

Texas is a southern state and most people who live here recognize that fact and are aware of the state's history and it's significance as a southern state. That being said, like other border states, it has definite influences that are from other regions, regions that it borders. Take for instance, northern Virginia. It's part of the south, but has a lot of northern influence. West Virginia is another example of a state with both northern and southern influences. Arkansas feels very "southern" in the southern half but definitely not southern in the northern half.
 
Old 08-23-2014, 08:35 AM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
Reputation: 19674
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Actually eastern Texas is in the eastern half of the country and is practically inseparable from Louisiana and Arkansas, so it is unquestionably the south.
Huhhh??? State lines dictate separation. Eastern Texas isn't clearly defined as separate from the rest of Texas and is separated from Louisiana by the state line. Look at a map...Texas is west of the state lines that define the eastern half.
 
Old 08-23-2014, 08:37 AM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
Reputation: 19674
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Really? Many east Texans (half the state - and the half with the most people) would heartily disagree with you on that point.

Texas is a southern state and most people who live here recognize that fact and are aware of the state's history and it's significance as a southern state. That being said, like other border states, it has definite influences that are from other regions, regions that it borders. Take for instance, northern Virginia. It's part of the south, but has a lot of northern influence. West Virginia is another example of a state with both northern and southern influences. Arkansas feels very "southern" in the southern half but definitely not southern in the northern half.
We're talking geography and maps, not the inexact science of how "Homer Stetson" defines himself as a Texan.
 
Old 08-23-2014, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,100 posts, read 36,318,714 times
Reputation: 63823
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
We're talking geography and maps, not the inexact science of how "Homer Stetson" defines himself as a Texan.
Well, since we'll use your criteria (rather than history - remember that Texas was a southern state that seceded during the Civil War along with the other southern states). If you look at a map, the only state moer SOUTHERN than Texas is Florida, geographically.

Also, if you look at a map, the east/west line goes through Texas. But we're not even talking about "east vs west" - we're talking about SOUTH and geographically speaking, Texas is, well...south.

So, to recap - Texas is geographically in the South. It's historically placed in the South, as a Confederate state. The state is rife with Southern traditions - southern drawl, southern cooking, southern friendliness, country music, etc.

So you can say "Texas isn't a southern state," all you like, but frankly, it doesn't change the fact that it IS southern - with southwestern and Plains states and midwestern influences as well, due to it's GEOGRAPHICAL position as a state with borders to the southwest and midwest.

My post, and my opinion, and the facts I've presented, have nothing to do with Homer Stetson, whoever the hell that is.
 
Old 08-23-2014, 10:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,171,589 times
Reputation: 4350
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Huhhh??? State lines dictate separation. Eastern Texas isn't clearly defined as separate from the rest of Texas and is separated from Louisiana by the state line. Look at a map...Texas is west of the state lines that define the eastern half.
State lines are government boundaries which have absolutely no influence on the culture. The way people live doesn't suddenly change as soon as you cross a border. Eastern Texas is culturally southern. That is the point being made.

Also if you were to evenly divide the mainland US in half, roughly one third of Texas would fall in the east. So it all depends on how you choose to look at it. Your way is just one of several.
 
Old 08-24-2014, 03:22 AM
 
922 posts, read 1,018,776 times
Reputation: 750
Henry Grady, as cited by a previous poster, created the term " New South " in the late 19th century. Yet no mention of the fact that Henry Grady also promoted white supremacy.
 
Old 08-24-2014, 10:48 AM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,459,781 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceter View Post
Henry Grady, as cited by a previous poster, created the term " New South " in the late 19th century. Yet no mention of the fact that Henry Grady also promoted white supremacy.
Few White Southerners at that time didn't.
 
Old 08-24-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,100 posts, read 36,318,714 times
Reputation: 63823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Few White Southerners at that time didn't.
How many white southerners alive in the 19th century do you personally know - and have discussed their views on white supremacy with?

Quick history lesson here - the MYTH of Aryan superiority was born in EUROPE (not the American south, just to clarify) and really took hold in the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century. You may recall a certain dictator in Europe and a certain world war fought that included a lot of racism at it's core.

Unfortunately, that myth wasn't popular only in Europe - it took hold in Russia and in the US (not just the south either) as well in some circles, including some academic circles. However, it never gained the foothold here that it did in Europe or Russia.

Aryan supremacy is a horrid, and misguided belief system - and I for one (the descendant of generations of southerners) am quite glad it's run it's course for the most part. I personally find the very idea abhorrent, as did my parents and grandparents, and great grandparents for that matter (and they were born in the American south in the 19th century and I was blessed to know two of them, neither of whom had a racist bone in their bodies).
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top