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Old 08-27-2014, 09:08 AM
 
29,927 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Wow. Pot, meet kettle.
Please. All I did was show you how my statement didn't mean what you thought it meant. I didn't set myself up as some jackleg C-D history professor.

Quote:
I think it's well within the guidelines of this forum to expand the discussion on a particular point. If you don't agree with my point or perspective, sure, let's discuss it. No need to take it so personally or to resort to personal insults.
For the umpteenth time, you can do that but stop doing it disingenuously. All of this could have been avoided had you simply said, "My misunderstanding; I thought you were insinuating that historically, White Southerners were more racist than their Northern counterparts. I see we're in agreement on this point." A little humility goes a long way, but I guess the need to be right above all else trumps everything and that's unfortunate.

 
Old 08-28-2014, 03:50 AM
 
920 posts, read 1,016,128 times
Reputation: 750
The day when remnants of " Old South " symbolism no longer exist will be the day that the " ,New South " begins to exist.
 
Old 08-28-2014, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,748 posts, read 3,338,741 times
Reputation: 6473
"Same as it ever was...Same as it ever was".

Talking Heads.

The south has not changed. it used to be Democrat (Dixiecrat) Now it's mostly Republican.

It was conservative and still is.

The New South? I don't believe there is one. Right to Work (AKA Union Busting)
Walmart and Mega-churches. Lots of chain restaurants.

I like the fact that there are many pretty cities and some southerners love to have fun and accept northerners. I've had a good time over shrimp and grits and some Jack Black on the rocks with non bible belt southerners.

Love Elvis, Jerry Lee and Truman Capote. But the south and hard religion really did a job o them.

Now, Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash? They were southerners who stepped out of their comfort zones and reached the rest of American.
 
Old 08-28-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,959,899 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceter View Post
The day when remnants of " Old South " symbolism no longer exist will be the day that the " ,New South " begins to exist.
Boy, could you be a more blatant hater of anything Southern or what?!

How, exactly, did you end up such a bitter, tortured soul?
 
Old 08-29-2014, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Oh, I won't. A simple "head-smack" emoticon says it all. Nep is obviously on a mission to take any available cheap-shot at the South he can throw in, and it's usually founded in a bunch of stereotypical, outdated, ignorant bull$hit. I've grown all too familiar with his particular brand of stereotyping. I seriously doubt he has ever even been to the South.
I've been all over the South. Every state except Arkansas. I even tried living in the Charlotte area for a month. While it wasn't a bad place to live, I just didn't see the big fuss. The place is loaded with mostly generic chain restaurants, tons and tons of cheap new housing. And the overall area was just lacking soul. It's hard to distinguish between each town because they all basically look and feel the same. Anyone who has spent a considerable amount of time in the Northeast would notice this as well, with the sunbelt metros. Generic, soulless, cheap new housing, indistinguishable suburbs and erosion of culture due to a huge influx of transplants. Only the core area of the metros seem to have character and history.

Another thing to note is that the cost of living advantage in many sunbelt metros is eroding as we speak. The median home value in Houston has shot up by $100K in the past two years. Raleigh's median home value is now well over $200K, putting it in line with the Hartford, CT metro area.

These are all facts or observations, and I welcome anyone to challenge them.
 
Old 08-29-2014, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,748 posts, read 36,160,327 times
Reputation: 63382
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I've been all over the South. Every state except Arkansas. I even tried living in the Charlotte area for a month. While it wasn't a bad place to live, I just didn't see the big fuss. The place is loaded with mostly generic chain restaurants, tons and tons of cheap new housing. And the overall area was just lacking soul. It's hard to distinguish between each town because they all basically look and feel the same. Anyone who has spent a considerable amount of time in the Northeast would notice this as well, with the sunbelt metros. Generic, soulless, cheap new housing, indistinguishable suburbs and erosion of culture due to a huge influx of transplants. Only the core area of the metros seem to have character and history.

Another thing to note is that the cost of living advantage in many sunbelt metros is eroding as we speak. The median home value in Houston has shot up by $100K in the past two years. Raleigh's median home value is now well over $200K, putting it in line with the Hartford, CT metro area.

These are all facts or observations, and I welcome anyone to challenge them.
Yawn. Stay where you are.

I'll just say that if the south was such a terrible place to live, we wouldn't have such a "huge influx of transplants" - and by the way, THAT'S why we're building so many new houses. People have to live somewhere - and why not offer them something affordable and comfortable? We have the luxury of space and apparently lots and lots of people prefer to live in larger homes on larger lots rather than some of the alternatives they gladly left behind.

I think people see what they want to see a lot of times. For instance, prior to moving to Texas, when I was young and thought I wanted to live in downtown Atlanta in a penthouse decorated in a very contemporary style, yada yada yada, I visited Dallas with my aunt and uncle. All I could "see" was flat land, cowboys, BBQ, concrete, and pickup trucks. Honestly, if you'd asked me what I saw in Dallas, that was all I probably could have told you. Between my preconceived notions and my biases and my expectations, that's what I "saw." Texas was a culture shock to me and felt very "western" and sort of weird, and I was a bit overwhelmed by the sense of space. To be honest, I didn't like it, not at all.

Then I involuntarily moved here about five years later and over the course of about a year, I reluctantly fell in love with this state. Now I realize just how limited my opinions and perceptions were. I feel a little foolish about my initially negative opinion but that's OK, because I've found that Texans in general are some of the most friendly, accepting people in the world. Another cool thing about Texans is that you don't have to "be from" Texas for them to accept you as a straight up Texan. All you have to do is move here and love this state and bingo - YOU'RE A TEXAN! It's so cool.

I have some good friends who live in Belgium. They love the US, especially the South, and visit us here in Texas about once every three or four years. One if their favorite past times is to drive around neighborhoods with realtor.com pulled up, and look up home prices and square footage as we go. They are absolutely, positively AMAZED - and they are very well off at home in Belgium and have a lovely home there in a small town - which cost about triple what a comparable home would cost here. Our neighborhoods/suburbs amaze them - the low cost of housing, the space, the quiet streets, the nearby amenities. They think we live in the veritable lap of luxury here in southern suburbia, and after traveling and living all over this world, I tend to agree with them.
 
Old 08-29-2014, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,093 posts, read 4,135,691 times
Reputation: 3117
Lots of ignorance about the south in this thread. Anybody that thinks the South has not changed since the early 20th century is totally either blissfully ignorant, or deliberately incendiary.

Yes, the South overall leans to the right. That's just how it is, but you can find plenty of people in the south that have different ideals. I'm left of the center and I have no problems interacting with people here (and I'm not just talking about Austin). This is coming from a black male in his mid 20s that's never voted republican a day in his life.

As for religion. Yes, there are some zealots. But the vast majority of religious people I've met are sincerely decent people. Sure, they have biases based on their faith, but everyone has biases. How is looking down on premarital sex any worse than looking down on people who eat at chain restaurants or are overweight (things posters from more "tolerant" parts of the country seem to love to do)?

Chain restaurants. Yes, there are quite a few. But there are tons of local options. If you're too lazy to learn about them that's on you. Also, down south a lot of us still know how to cook in our kitchens at home what a novel concept!

I disagree with a lot of aspects of the south, such as the tendency of some southerners to romanticize its past, but there's still nowhere else I'd rather live.

Excuse the poor editing and formatting. This was typed from a smartphone.
 
Old 08-29-2014, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yawn. Stay where you are.

I'll just say that if the south was such a terrible place to live, we wouldn't have such a "huge influx of transplants" - and by the way, THAT'S why we're building so many new houses. People have to live somewhere - and why not offer them something affordable and comfortable? We have the luxury of space and apparently lots and lots of people prefer to live in larger homes on larger lots rather than some of the alternatives they gladly left behind.

I think people see what they want to see a lot of times. For instance, prior to moving to Texas, when I was young and thought I wanted to live in downtown Atlanta in a penthouse decorated in a very contemporary style, yada yada yada, I visited Dallas with my aunt and uncle. All I could "see" was flat land, cowboys, BBQ, concrete, and pickup trucks. Honestly, if you'd asked me what I saw in Dallas, that was all I probably could have told you. Between my preconceived notions and my biases and my expectations, that's what I "saw." Texas was a culture shock to me and felt very "western" and sort of weird, and I was a bit overwhelmed by the sense of space. To be honest, I didn't like it, not at all.

Then I involuntarily moved here about five years later and over the course of about a year, I reluctantly fell in love with this state. Now I realize just how limited my opinions and perceptions were. I feel a little foolish about my initially negative opinion but that's OK, because I've found that Texans in general are some of the most friendly, accepting people in the world. Another cool thing about Texans is that you don't have to "be from" Texas for them to accept you as a straight up Texan. All you have to do is move here and love this state and bingo - YOU'RE A TEXAN! It's so cool.

I have some good friends who live in Belgium. They love the US, especially the South, and visit us here in Texas about once every three or four years. One if their favorite past times is to drive around neighborhoods with realtor.com pulled up, and look up home prices and square footage as we go. They are absolutely, positively AMAZED - and they are very well off at home in Belgium and have a lovely home there in a small town - which cost about triple what a comparable home would cost here. Our neighborhoods/suburbs amaze them - the low cost of housing, the space, the quiet streets, the nearby amenities. They think we live in the veritable lap of luxury here in southern suburbia, and after traveling and living all over this world, I tend to agree with them.
What's popular doesn't necessarily mean that that's what's better.

Every major metro area in Texas is a sprawlfest with unbelievable traffic, and yes, fast paced. That is not appealing to me. IF there was a metro area of about under 3 million in TX that wasn't so damn congested and populated, then maybe it would appeal to me. So, TX has nothing to offer for me.
 
Old 08-29-2014, 08:43 AM
 
29,927 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
What's popular doesn't necessarily mean that that's what's better.
In this case, "better" is subjective. Many people have decided that living in the South is better for them and it's good to live in a nation where we have such options.
 
Old 08-29-2014, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
Reputation: 7075
There's also a lot of people who have transplanted from Texas (and Florida) to Connecticut, by the way. I have neighbors with Texas license plates who just moved in. There's another guy at my gym who just moved here from Texas as well. And a nurse that I recently saw who moved up here from Texas. And a guy that I used to work with at a previous job, moved up here from Texas. The list goes on....
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