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Old 11-06-2014, 10:57 AM
 
9,012 posts, read 8,307,923 times
Reputation: 14429

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
LOL, horrible logic.

"It isn't the ugly scenery, it's you, hon".

"The only difference between Tuscany and Nebraska is your internal mindset".
Lol

Some twisted logic there!!
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Old 11-06-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,911,740 times
Reputation: 4778
I never met anybody who actually hated the midwest, this post is hilarious. The only negative I heard heard about the Midwest is that the landscape is flat and boring. Almost everyone I ever met loves Chicago and thinks its one of the best cities in the country, as for Detroit, St Louis, Cleveland I don't think anybody hates them.. they are just not big tourist attraction cities.
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Old 11-06-2014, 02:26 PM
 
1,401 posts, read 1,638,567 times
Reputation: 1428
The Midwest gets a lot of hate due to so much of it being full of ghost towns and significantly emptied out cities, all of which serve as reminders of a time when the US was an industrial and middle class power house.

Bad weather and crime don't help.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:28 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,073 posts, read 5,446,091 times
Reputation: 4299
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBideon View Post
The Midwest gets a lot of hate due to so much of it being full of ghost towns and significantly emptied out cities, all of which serve as reminders of a time when the US was an industrial and middle class power house.

Bad weather and crime don't help.
Are you talking about the plains states? I have never seen a true ghost town in Michigan. Most of our small towns are nicer than what I've seen out west or down south. Same with Wisconsin, Indiana, etc. We probably take a back seat when it comes to small towns in New England or elsewhere in the northeast, but that's about it.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,389,357 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBideon View Post
The Midwest gets a lot of hate due to so much of it being full of ghost towns and significantly emptied out cities, all of which serve as reminders of a time when the US was an industrial and middle class power house.

Bad weather and crime don't help.
What a goofy post!

Ghost towns? Parts of some cities (ie Detroit) have abandoned houses, but youre overexaggerating here, bud.

Crime? In some cities, yes. Its nothing different than anywhere else in the nation.
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Old 11-06-2014, 03:41 PM
 
3,952 posts, read 3,485,687 times
Reputation: 6325
Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Are you talking about the plains states? I have never seen a true ghost town in Michigan. Most of our small towns are nicer than what I've seen out west or down south. Same with Wisconsin, Indiana, etc. We probably take a back seat when it comes to small towns in New England or elsewhere in the northeast, but that's about it.
They are making incendiary comments about Midwestern cities to try and gode people into getting pissed off. Definitely not referring to actual ghost towns.
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:27 PM
 
5,543 posts, read 6,974,619 times
Reputation: 2791
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Well, neither is Duluth. Or Dubuque. Or the entirety of the Driftless. Or the Iron Range, or Black Hills or vast areas of the northwoods. But it's certainly much flatter than the Mountain West, for starters. Not to mention the Appalacians.
SE Ohio is in the midwest. But it is also Appalachian. It is also hilly. Now I am confused.
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,462,348 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101
LOL, horrible logic.

"It isn't the ugly scenery, it's you, hon".

"The only difference between Tuscany and Nebraska is your internal mindset".
Quote:
Originally Posted by believe007 View Post
Lol

Some twisted logic there!!

That's our City-Data's. NOLA101.
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Old 11-06-2014, 06:42 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,462,348 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
SE Ohio is in the midwest. But it is also Appalachian. It is also hilly. Now I am confused.
Ohioans... seem to have issues if they ARE ACCUALLY IN OR they should be PART OF THE MIDWEST? Or NORTHEAST??
There are threads debating it.
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Old 11-06-2014, 07:46 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,758,291 times
Reputation: 11326
The rude comments I've noticed are from west or east coast snob types. The ones that think or wish they were something and see themselves higher in status by bragging about "the coast". These are also the types that speak of the Midwest as "flyover country".

From an article and map entitled Rank Order of States (continental 48) by Percentage of Area in Flattest Category, it's interesting that while Nebraska is the 20th flattest state, California is 24th. Missouri is in 21st place, Michigan 22nd flattest, and Wisconsin, 25th. Then there is New Jersey in 14th place, Maryland, 18th and Delaware is 6th. Out of the top 5 flattest states, 3 of them are in the south. Even the fair haired child, Colorado (ranked 31st), has some flatter areas of the state.

Michigan does have some nice small towns, they tend to look more northeastern, than southern or Midwestern. I see nothing wrong with what Michigan83 said. Reference Ohio, it would depend what part of the state they live in as to whether they identify more with the Midwest or the east. Just like the Panhandle of western Nebraska tends to identify more with Wyoming than eastern Nebraska.
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