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Old 11-07-2014, 02:45 AM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,462,884 times
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Kind of like Maryland? Today does it see itself as a Northern or Northeastern state? Or Southern one? Parts of western Maryland probably very much still Southern? Northern for the Eastern parts? Even DC... Is it a Northern city? Southern? Basically its own state. But some might argue like with Ohio? That today it's more a Northeastern ? Delaware too.
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Old 11-07-2014, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,872,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
I'd happily take a temperate drizzle over a brutal cold winter, but this is a debatable point.
no it isn't
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Old 11-07-2014, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,034 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Are you talking about the plains states? I have never seen a true ghost town in Michigan. Most of our small towns are nicer than what I've seen out west or down south. Same with Wisconsin, Indiana, etc. We probably take a back seat when it comes to small towns in New England or elsewhere in the northeast, but that's about it.
Agreed on Upper Midwestern small towns...but to be fair, there are a bunch of ghost towns in the UP, usually former mining spots. My favorite to walk around is Fayette on the Garden Peninsula, which is a preserved Michigan state park:


Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
SE Ohio is in the midwest. But it is also Appalachian. It is also hilly. Now I am confused.
You definitely are! Ohio's high point is 1,500 ft. It gets hilly in the SE, but not outrageously so for the Midwest. Hocking Hills area is very nice! Black Hills are much larger though, and the MO Ozarks as well as the Driftless are consistently hillier in a greater area and higher than SE OH, not to mention the Iron Range and areas of the northwoods - not sure why you're concentrating there but nowhere else with your argument

I believe we're all agreeing that the Midwest is not uniformly flat, at least.
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Old 11-07-2014, 10:51 AM
 
5,543 posts, read 6,976,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post

You definitely are! Ohio's high point is 1,500 ft.

Ohio's high point is near Bellefontaine, which is not in the SE portion of Ohio.
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Old 11-07-2014, 10:55 AM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
Reputation: 2855
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Right, I'm a multi-generational Wisconsinite, and for me the casseroles at pot lucks (with jello desserts) faded into the 80s and I never see it anymore. And that was a long time ago! To equate some rural ND hot dish deal from many decades ago with the cuisine you find in major Midwestern metros is simply asinine.
I debated whether to respond, since I don't visit these pages to get into personal attacks, but

a) not sure why you need to suggest that an opinion you disagree with is 'extremely stupid or foolish.' People can legitimately disagree
b) I said much earlier in the thread that the 'hot dish' line was a joke
c) The cuisine on the west coast is very different than the midwest. Certainly both have their comfort foods, and if you're dining out in a major city you can find a lot of variety, and sure, if you have the money you can get almost anything at a Whole Foods or equivalent.

But the prevailing trend does matter if you aren't dining out regularly or shopping at WF - I lived in the midwest and northeast for three decades, but living in the west now it's a very different experience. Things that are abundant here I have to very specifically seek out when I'm back in the midwest. And if you want to grow your own food, you can grow a variety of things year-round with just a simple grow box.

Anyway, I may not disagree with you and my experience has been different, but I don't see a need to denigrate your opinion over that.
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Old 11-07-2014, 11:23 AM
 
3,492 posts, read 4,952,643 times
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The midwest SUCKS. Neither mountains nor beaches, and a large portion of the midwest doesn't even get the great lakes. Granted, the great lakes are pretty awesome, but I hear midwest and think of places like Iowa, which just suck massively. Chicago has bad traffic and weather, but great entertainment and career prospects so it's still a very solid city. Cincinnati isn't too bad either.

Basically several of the areas seem to be lacking the reasonable cost of living that once made them attractive. The job prospects suck in most areas, the weather sucks, the lack of access to public services sucks, and the high taxes are awful. If the debate is about the best cities in the midwest, yeah, there are some really nice cities. It's all the rural dead open space in between those cities that is so lame. Iowa City is just a god forsaken waste of space.

The Appalachian areas and Chicago are all alright. If you don't mind the cold, they're pretty good. The rest is lame.
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Old 11-07-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,389,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lurtsman View Post
The midwest SUCKS. Neither mountains nor beaches, and a large portion of the midwest doesn't even get the great lakes. Granted, the great lakes are pretty awesome, but I hear midwest and think of places like Iowa, which just suck massively. Chicago has bad traffic and weather, but great entertainment and career prospects so it's still a very solid city. Cincinnati isn't too bad either.

Basically several of the areas seem to be lacking the reasonable cost of living that once made them attractive. The job prospects suck in most areas, the weather sucks, the lack of access to public services sucks, and the high taxes are awful. If the debate is about the best cities in the midwest, yeah, there are some really nice cities. It's all the rural dead open space in between those cities that is so lame. Iowa City is just a god forsaken waste of space.

The Appalachian areas and Chicago are all alright. If you don't mind the cold, they're pretty good. The rest is lame.
Yeah...the Midwest's rolling hills, deep forests, thundering waterfalls, towering sand dunes, massive bodies of fresh water, expansive lakes, world class cities, sandstone canyons, wide open prairies, vast river systems, cultural diversity, glades, harbors framed by Norman Rocwell-esque villages, islands, pristine sand beaches, jagged rock formations, tight-knit communities, etc, etc, etc, really SUCK, man! I mean, its such a horrible place to live!

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Old 11-07-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,034 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by lurtsman View Post
The midwest SUCKS. Neither mountains nor beaches, and a large portion of the midwest doesn't even get the great lakes. Granted, the great lakes are pretty awesome, but I hear midwest and think of places like Iowa, which just suck massively. Chicago has bad traffic and weather, but great entertainment and career prospects so it's still a very solid city. Cincinnati isn't too bad either.

Basically several of the areas seem to be lacking the reasonable cost of living that once made them attractive. The job prospects suck in most areas, the weather sucks, the lack of access to public services sucks, and the high taxes are awful. If the debate is about the best cities in the midwest, yeah, there are some really nice cities. It's all the rural dead open space in between those cities that is so lame. Iowa City is just a god forsaken waste of space.

The Appalachian areas and Chicago are all alright. If you don't mind the cold, they're pretty good. The rest is lame.
^ AKA, I've been to SE OH and flew into Chicago once and otherwise have zero knowledge of the Midwest, yet I'll rant anyhow because I'm a typical C-D dolt. Come back to us when you've been in more than 2 Midwestern cities, kid.
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Old 11-07-2014, 12:21 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,483 posts, read 2,223,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
I was mostly making a joke (hot dish was a bit broader than lutefisk), but hot dish is fairly representative of midwest cuisine in general. In Iowa you'd see something pretty similar at a pot luck, they're just calling the same dish a casserole even though condensed soup and noodles are a common base.

And of course, in Iowa they traditionally put tater tots on it.
Yeah, outside of tuna noodle casserole or green bean casserole, I had zero contact with casserole or hot dish growing up in St. Louis. Something like mostaccioli (pronounced muskacholi) is a different story though. A lot of the food staples in St. Louis have some sort of basis in BBQ or Italian, not some random casserole covered in tots.
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Old 11-07-2014, 02:06 PM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
^ AKA, I've been to SE OH and flew into Chicago once and otherwise have zero knowledge of the Midwest, yet I'll rant anyhow because I'm a typical C-D dolt. Come back to us when you've been in more than 2 Midwestern cities, kid.
He's whining and crying about job experiences he had living in the Midwest and being passed up in other posts, so yeah, surprise, not exactly an unbiased opinion or anything.
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