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Old 05-01-2016, 05:20 PM
 
1,073 posts, read 1,227,017 times
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One of the major factors as to why the Midwest is ignored and why so many Midwesterners don't really care for it as a region is because there's nothing clustered together. There are so few really notable cities to start with, then spread that out over a region nearly half the size of the country. On the East Cost, you can get mountains, ocean and massive cities with diverse character within a few hours. Where I live, in mid-Michigan, it would take me a minimum of 5 hours just to get to one noteworthy city, Chicago. Probably another 4 or 5 beyond that to find another one. Nothing is close, and while cities like Kansas City might be nice, I have no particular reason to travel 15 hours to see it, you know?
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Old 05-01-2016, 07:23 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,572 posts, read 2,584,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VM1138 View Post
One of the major factors as to why the Midwest is ignored and why so many Midwesterners don't really care for it as a region is because there's nothing clustered together. There are so few really notable cities to start with, then spread that out over a region nearly half the size of the country. On the East Cost, you can get mountains, ocean and massive cities with diverse character within a few hours. Where I live, in mid-Michigan, it would take me a minimum of 5 hours just to get to one noteworthy city, Chicago. Probably another 4 or 5 beyond that to find another one. Nothing is close, and while cities like Kansas City might be nice, I have no particular reason to travel 15 hours to see it, you know?

Exactly. After you have seen Chicago and the Michigan Coast, what other point is there to seeing the midwest? Everything else will be a downgrade.

It's like going to California. You see LA, SD, the bay area. But do you really have a reason to see Sacramento, Fresno, Eureka, and such? These places are all okay in their own right(okay maybe not Fresno) , but not really worth going out of the way to see, besides once or twice in your life.
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Old 05-02-2016, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,729 posts, read 7,686,254 times
Reputation: 7650
Quote:
Originally Posted by VM1138 View Post
One of the major factors as to why the Midwest is ignored and why so many Midwesterners don't really care for it as a region is because there's nothing clustered together. There are so few really notable cities to start with, then spread that out over a region nearly half the size of the country. On the East Cost, you can get mountains, ocean and massive cities with diverse character within a few hours. Where I live, in mid-Michigan, it would take me a minimum of 5 hours just to get to one noteworthy city, Chicago. Probably another 4 or 5 beyond that to find another one. Nothing is close, and while cities like Kansas City might be nice, I have no particular reason to travel 15 hours to see it, you know?
Hate to break it to you, but there are nowhere places on the east coast too.

If you live in Bangor, ME, it will take you 4 hours to get to Boston.

Even if you live in Boston, it takes 4 hours at least to get to NYC, depending on traffic.

Cities in the midwest that are about 2 hours or less apart (midwestern cities and those just outside):
- Cleveland to Pittsburgh
- Cleveland to Columbus
- Columbus to Cincinnati
- Cleveland to Detroit
- Cincinnati to Indianapolis
- Cincinnati to Louisville
- Chicago to Milwaukee
- Milwaukee to Madison

Sure there are bigger cities that are more isolated, like Minneapolis, St. Louis. True enough. But just because you live in the middle of nowhere doesn't mean that everyone does. move to a city and you might enjoy life more.
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Old 05-02-2016, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,318,361 times
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My favorite reason for living in a city: leaving it to visit another city. I get that's a neat perk but if this is the major downgrade to living in the Midwest I think I can live with that.

Last edited by Min-Chi-Cbus; 05-02-2016 at 09:12 AM..
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Old 05-02-2016, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
I think real estate prices confirm this. I can't think of any other reason why someone would want to live in Ohio or Oklahoma other than the fact that it's dirt cheap compared to most of the East/West coast.
Wait, doesn't much of the South have cheap housing? Isn't that cited all the time on this forum?


Also, real estate prices can be caused by a multitude of factors, not just straight demand. Lack of supply, zoning laws, bubbles...
In any case, the Midwestern cities with a higher quality of life or strong economy all have population growth.
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
LA county has more people than every midwest state but Illinois.

Midwest states have low population because hardly anyone wants to live there. Half the people that do live there do so for family reasons. The rest are stuck.
Actually, it probably has a lot more to do with how the nation developed historically. Consider that the majority of the nation's largest cities are near water, because that was economically important at the time, especially for navigation. Only later did landlocked cities like Atlanta, Dallas, Phoenix and Denver really start to matter. In the Midwest, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, etc. are all on major rivers or bodies of water and were historically some of the nation's largest cities. Today, cities like Indianapolis, Columbus and Omaha are growing quickly because being on the water is less important now for a strong economy (especially now that manufacturing has declined so much).
The same is really true for states overall. Coastal states and Great Lakes states make up all of the most populated. The Midwest is mostly landlocked otherwise. But please don't let facts get in the way of stupid hyperbole.
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:40 AM
 
Location: New England
2,183 posts, read 1,356,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Wait, doesn't much of the South have cheap housing? Isn't that cited all the time on this forum?


Also, real estate prices can be caused by a multitude of factors, not just straight demand. Lack of supply, zoning laws, bubbles...
In any case, the Midwestern cities with a higher quality of life or strong economy all have population growth.
Yes the South and the Midwest have the cheapest COL in the country. And that is true geography and NIMBY's are what helps make cities like Boston and San Francisco so expensive.

The 15 most affordable places to live in America - CBS News
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Old 05-02-2016, 10:46 AM
 
Location: The South
5,225 posts, read 3,637,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
This thread is about the Midwest, you can make your own thread if you want.



Care to explain why?

I agree with you that "ignored" is probably better than "hated."
Then again, every so often I see people referring to like "backwards farm hicks in the Midwest" and just generally talking like it's desolate and as conservative as the Deep South. I imagine that's not an idea most people have but it is there I guess.
The folks in the deep South don't consider it desolute,but as you just said, this thread is about the midwest.
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Old 05-02-2016, 11:12 AM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,530,096 times
Reputation: 5304
Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
Yes the South and the Midwest have the cheapest COL in the country. And that is true geography and NIMBY's are what helps make cities like Boston and San Francisco so expensive.

The 15 most affordable places to live in America - CBS News
Wow, a lot of Ohio cities on that list
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Old 05-02-2016, 11:18 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
815 posts, read 462,270 times
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"ignored" but not hated. I admit that when someone says midwest I instantly think of amber waves of grain and maybe the Witchita State logo... with wheat for his hair. I think it boils down to identity. Here in the south a lot of people speak with a southern accent. We drink sweet tea. In Raleigh we love the bible, BBQ, and college basketball. Everybody knows it. Ask somebody that hasn't lived in the midwest what they think of when they hear the term "midwest" and you'll probably get a bit of a pause. "Southern" "Cajun" "Memphis Style" "BBQ" "Soul food" "Calabash" "downhome cooking" "Caribbean" are popular culinary styles that are widely recognized and normally associated with the south. (I actually visited a "southern fried" fast food place in Cork, Ireland just to see how weird it was!!)


I struggle to think of anything like this from the midwest save for Chicago deep dish pizza or cheese curds. I'm not saying by any means that the midwest is void just not very widely known. My mother in law (who lived in Columbus) broke it down for me like this: "There's just not a lot of seasoning"
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