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Old 05-03-2016, 12:42 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,250,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS313 View Post
Exactly! We were clearly talking about food that originated in the Midwest, not places in the Midwest to visit .
Nope. We were talking about food that makes the Midwest unique, appealing or worth a visit. At no point was there any claim that the Midwest lacks fast food restaurant chains.
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Old 05-03-2016, 12:45 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,072,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
To be fair, most people aren't asking about chain restaurants when they say "tell me about food." And if they are, they're definitely not asking about McDonalds or Little Caesars. Now, KC BBQ and Skyline chili, those are great examples of Midwest cuisine.
Agreed...I posted a nice link, as well.
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Old 05-03-2016, 12:59 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,527,165 times
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Is there a defined line of where the Midwest starts and ends? Some states are easy: IA, MN, WI, IL, OH, MI, IN

What about NE, KS, OK, AR, WV, PA?

That in itself could be another 1,000 post thread
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:01 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,072,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IShootNikon View Post
Is there a defined line of where the Midwest starts and ends? Some states are easy: IA, MN, WI, IL, OH, MI, IN

What about NE, KS, OK, AR, WV, PA?

That in itself could be another 1,000 post thread
You should look at a map.

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Old 05-03-2016, 01:02 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,527,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
You should look at a map.
....crickets.....
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,655 posts, read 4,600,930 times
Reputation: 2566
Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
To be fair, most people aren't asking about chain restaurants when they say "tell me about food." And if they are, they're definitely not asking about McDonalds or Little Caesars. Now, KC BBQ and Skyline chili, those are great examples of Midwest cuisine.
That's fine... but to be fair the first paragraph I posted was full of non chain foods. I just threw some of the chains in there for some "fun facts" or "FYI" because the more people have heard about those places.

Quote:
Nope. We were talking about food that makes the Midwest unique, appealing or worth a visit. At no point was there any claim that the Midwest lacks fast food restaurant chains.
Nope. The poster I replied to said "I struggle to find (or think of) anything from the Midwest". I admit I read his post a little too fast yesterday. But what someone thinks is worth a visit is subjective. And that was not in his post btw. But whatever. I named a BOTH chains that originated in the Midwest and unique midwest cuisine... so who cares?
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,485,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zizu View Post
Most of the Midwest has been deforested and converted to farmland. This process occurred during the 19-20th century and was done to an extent more than any other region of the country. Basically, its natural resources have been stripped bare for the sake of agribusiness. It's quite depressing to know that the vast tracts of boring farmland were once pristine meadows of oak and prairie.

Aside from the northwoods areas which were somewhat spared, there are pockets of preserved (second growth forests) here and there, but they are isolated and seem out of place in prevailing dull landscape.

Um... no. Most of the Plains states that are part of the Midwest never had extensive forests. That was largely an East of the Mississippi thing that gradually declined into the prairielands to the west. Kansas, Nebraska, the Dakotas, etc. were not deforested. This is just geographic (and historical) ignorance on display.


Now, the entire East and South were largely deforested for years, though. Have you ever noticed how landscape photos around the Civil War era seem really devoid of significant trees and forests? They didn't start growing back really until the 2nd half of the 20th century.
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,485,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Tourists should visit the Midwest because of Little Caesars, McDonalds and Hungry Howie's? I think this thread has reached the end of useful life...
Why should anyone have to travel anywhere for specific types of food now? If I want grits and fried chicken, I don't have to go to the South for them. If I want deep dish pizza, I can pretty much go to any major city besides Chicago. If I want TexMex, I don't need to be in Texas. There are very very few regional foods that are completely inaccessible in other regions today. No one is a food tourist in America, not really.
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Midwest
4,628 posts, read 3,972,200 times
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We have clean air, freshwater, incredible sunrises and sunsets, and depending on where you live in the Midwest some of the freshest and best meat and vegetables.
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Old 05-03-2016, 01:54 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,250,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Why should anyone have to travel anywhere for specific types of food now? If I want grits and fried chicken, I don't have to go to the South for them. If I want deep dish pizza, I can pretty much go to any major city besides Chicago. If I want TexMex, I don't need to be in Texas. There are very very few regional foods that are completely inaccessible in other regions today. No one is a food tourist in America, not really.
I don't think this is true. There are lots of regional foods you can't get in other parts of the U.S., or if you can get them, usually aren't very good.

And even broad cuisines aren't equally available and/or good. Yes, you can get Mexican food, everywhere from Mexico to Maine. But just because Maine has Mexican restaurants doesn't mean it's the same as eating in Mexico City. Pizza is global. That doesn't mean Naples has the same pizza scene as Topeka.
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