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Old 08-27-2014, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539

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I've lived in Pittsburgh for the last nine years now, and the change in the city has been dramatic. I'm not just talking about Downtown - plenty of other rust belt cities have downtowns which are making a comeback. But a wide swathe of the city - around half of the city and the vast majority of the East End - is either stable middle class or strongly gentrifying/redeveloping. Pittsburgh is just heads above its peer group of rust belt cities of similar size (Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Saint Louis).

That's not to say there aren't still troubled pockets of the city. But compared to most rust belt cities, where one side of the city is effectively written off for dead as one giant ghetto, Pittsburgh is simply doing far, far better.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
This is an oversimplification, but shows neighborhood by neighborhood where Pittsburgh is right now.

Purple are areas which have been upper-middle class dominated for several decades.
Pink are student-dominated neighborhoods
Blue are neighborhoods widely considered to be gentrifying. In some cases, like Highland Park, portions have been upper-middle class for decades, and the gentrification is slowly pushing into the remainder of the neighborhood. In others, like East Allegheny, one side of the neighborhood is gentrifying while another is not.
Cyan are neighborhoods which are arguably beginning gentrification, but where there isn't major movement as of yet.
Green are stable lower-middle class neighborhoods. Property values are either slowly appreciating or pretty much flat, crime rates are relatively low, and while there's slow population decline, there's no serious blight.
Yellow are blighted, but not particularly dangerous neighborhoods. They are falling apart visually, but there is no major crime/gang issue besides vice and the like.
Orange are mixed neighborhoods which are perceived as heading towards ghetto status.
Red are the hard core, generally overwhelmingly black, ghetto neighborhoods.
Grey are non-residential areas. There is new development here, particularly in and around Downtown, but it's hard to call this gentrification per se.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:52 AM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,049,650 times
Reputation: 2543
Long Beach, CA
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Old 08-28-2014, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,426 posts, read 1,884,323 times
Reputation: 1493
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
Long Beach, CA
I love that place. The bars, the art, the mix of people you'll run into at local cafes (of various ethnicities, economic classes, educational backgrounds and professions), the progressive culture...even the new mayor.

I'm not sure if its going through a renaissance though. What makes you say it is?
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Old 08-28-2014, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,933,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironcouger View Post
If you call 2 sky scrapers a boom lol when other cities have dozens under construction .
First of all, ignore that poster.

Second of all - Philadelphia is actually booming right now. It's in full swing renaissance mode.

Philadelphia third in US in construction jobs

Quote:
Pouppirt's contracts, including several in Center City, are part of what is ranking the Philadelphia metropolitan division third nationally in the number of construction jobs added in a year, according to a trade group's analysis of Labor Department numbers.

Philadelphia, along with Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties, has added 8,500 construction jobs from July to July. Only Houston and Dallas have added more.


Read more at Phila. third in U.S. in new construction jobs
Phila. third in U.S. in new construction jobs


There is a lot more than 2 skyscrapers being built in Philly lol
1. Comcast Innovation and Technology Center - 59 floors - 1,121 feet
2. FMC Tower at Cira Centre South - 49 floors - 730 feet
3. SLS International - 47 floors - 590 feet
4. W & Element by Westin - 50 floors - 582 feet
5. Evo - 33 floors - 420 feet
6. 500 Walnut - 26 floors - 380 feet
7. 700 Schuylkill Ave - 23 floors - 375 feet
8. 1601 Vine - 32 floors - 370 feet
9. 1919 Market - 28 floors - 347 feet
10. 3601 Market - 28 floors - 320 feet
11. Penn Medicine South Tower - 19 floors - 302 feet
12. 1900 Chestnut - 26 floors - 295 feet
13. Children's Hospital Ambulatory Care Center- 14 floors - 292 feet
14. Lancaster Square - 25 floors - 279 feet
15. 38Chestnut - 25 floors - 278 feet
16. Philadelphia Family Court Building - 15 floors - 265 feet
17. One Riverside - 22 floors - 260 feet

^^This doesn't include any other proposals or anything under 250 feet.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Paris
1,706 posts, read 2,050,156 times
Reputation: 990
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I've lived in Pittsburgh for the last nine years now, and the change in the city has been dramatic. I'm not just talking about Downtown - plenty of other rust belt cities have downtowns which are making a comeback. But a wide swathe of the city - around half of the city and the vast majority of the East End - is either stable middle class or strongly gentrifying/redeveloping. Pittsburgh is just heads above its peer group of rust belt cities of similar size (Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Saint Louis).

That's not to say there aren't still troubled pockets of the city. But compared to most rust belt cities, where one side of the city is effectively written off for dead as one giant ghetto, Pittsburgh is simply doing far, far better.
No, it's not...
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caesarstl View Post
No, it's not...
Please elaborate.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:09 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,963,194 times
Reputation: 14668
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
This is an oversimplification, but shows neighborhood by neighborhood where Pittsburgh is right now.

Purple are areas which have been upper-middle class dominated for several decades.
Pink are student-dominated neighborhoods
Blue are neighborhoods widely considered to be gentrifying. In some cases, like Highland Park, portions have been upper-middle class for decades, and the gentrification is slowly pushing into the remainder of the neighborhood. In others, like East Allegheny, one side of the neighborhood is gentrifying while another is not.
Cyan are neighborhoods which are arguably beginning gentrification, but where there isn't major movement as of yet.
Green are stable lower-middle class neighborhoods. Property values are either slowly appreciating or pretty much flat, crime rates are relatively low, and while there's slow population decline, there's no serious blight.
Yellow are blighted, but not particularly dangerous neighborhoods. They are falling apart visually, but there is no major crime/gang issue besides vice and the like.
Orange are mixed neighborhoods which are perceived as heading towards ghetto status.
Red are the hard core, generally overwhelmingly black, ghetto neighborhoods.
Grey are non-residential areas. There is new development here, particularly in and around Downtown, but it's hard to call this gentrification per se.
You have the general idea, but I'd change a couple of things:


1. Crawford-Roberts, Terrace Village and West Oakland should be blue. There's a lot of new residential construction in all three neighborhoods.

2. Larimer, Hazelwood and Allegheny Center should be cyan. Larimer has begun attracting developers' attention, and Hazelwood is where the ambitious "Almono" project is going to be. There's also a proposal to rebuild the original street grid in Allegheny Center.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Paris
1,706 posts, read 2,050,156 times
Reputation: 990
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Please elaborate.
First, just to clarify when you're saying how it's "heads above" the other cities, do you mean in its rebound or the current status of the metro? (I interpreted your statement as the later). Then, if I interpreted your post correctly, can you give me some criteria as to how you evaluated your bold statement?
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
1. Crawford-Roberts, Terrace Village and West Oakland should be blue. There's a lot of new residential construction in all three neighborhoods.
I thought about this in some of these areas. However, the new development which has been going in (with the exception of the new apartments in West Oakland) has almost all been HUD assisted mixed-income. It's helped make these areas transition from ghetto (semi-ghetto for West Oakland) into socially stable, but I wouldn't say true gentrification has kicked in yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
2. Larimer, Hazelwood and Allegheny Center should be cyan. Larimer has begun attracting developers' attention, and Hazelwood is where the ambitious "Almono" project is going to be. There's also a proposal to rebuild the original street grid in Allegheny Center.
Larimer's new housing is going to be mixed income. We don't know yet for Almono in Hazelwood, but I wouldn't be surprised if this ultimately ends up mixed-income as well (a lot of people are going to be displaced from Bedford Dwellings soon, and they'll need somewhere to go). And any plans for new housing in Allgheny Center are decades away, unless you count the spiffing up the new landlord is doing to the existing residential towers there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caesarstl View Post
First, just to clarify when you're saying how it's "heads above" the other cities, do you mean in its rebound or the current status of the metro? (I interpreted your statement as the later). Then, if I interpreted your post correctly, can you give me some criteria as to how you evaluated your bold statement?
I am only referring to the core city, not the metro as a whole. The outlying counties are dying a slow death, besides a handful of exurbs which have become popular with tax scofflaws as they're just over the county line. Frankly many of the suburbs in Allegheny County are in decline too. But I'm a city person, so I don't care about that, and this thread is about city renaissance, not metro renaissance.

My experience with the other small rust-belt cities, as I have said, is they just don't have a core city which is gentrifying as fast or as widely. One half of the city is generally a low-income/black area which is treated as a mess that no white people ever go to. Even the working-class white sides of the cities often contain areas in steep decline. Usually it's just the downtowns, along with one or two neighborhoods immediately nearby, which experience gentrification, along with a socially stable neighborhood or two near the major universities. I know of none which have anything like Pittsburgh's East End, where some of the wealthiest neighborhoods in the entire metro are right inside of the city, and there's a swathe of neighborhoods between these and Downtown all gentrifying essentially simultaneously.
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