U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2014, 05:20 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926

Advertisements

Some "Little Italies" compared (Italian spoken at home from 2000 census and Italian American population in brackets, from zipatlas.com)

02113 (North End, Boston), 10.5% (36%)
19147 (Italian Market, Philadelphia), 2.7% (22%)
02903 (Federal Hill, Providence), 2.2% (15%)
60607 (Taylor Street, Chicago), 1.8% (9%)
10013 (Manhattan), 1.3% (8%)
94133 (North Beach, San Francisco), 1.3% (6%)
44106 (Cleveland), 0.6% (6%)
21202 (Baltimore), 0.5% (3%)

Note this is specifically the "Little Italy" district or equivalent, not urban Italian neighborhoods. Boston really stands out here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2014, 06:43 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,242,381 times
Reputation: 9846
Manhattan Little Italy, in terms of residential population, has a population no different from the other Lower Manhattan neighborhoods. It hasn't been residential Italian for about a half century. There are actually three traditional Manhattan Little Italys, and none are currently Italian in terms of residents (but all are Italian in terms of business). The other two are a portion of the South Village around Bleecker/6th, and East Harlem around Pleasant Ave.

The Outer Borough Little Italies (Arthur Avenue and Morris Park in the Bronx, Bensonhurst/Dyker/Gravesend/Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn, etc.) still have big Italian populations, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2014, 08:01 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926
About 60,000 Italian immigrants settled in NYC between 1965 and 1975 (and assuming the same proportion of 25% settled in NYC between 1946 and 1964 that yields about 140,000 post-war immigrants settling in the city) reinforcing Italian culture in Italian neighborhoods. By 1970, few Italian Americans remained in Manhattan and it was by-passed by the postwar immigrants:

"Italian immigrants seeking economic opportunities settled mostly in Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island, where they could count on Italian being spoken and where families, friends, churches and ethnic organizations helped them find housing and jobs. Such was the case of Francesco Pesce who migrated to the United States during the 1950s because he believed his sons would have more opportunity here. The Pesce family went to Red Hook in Brooklyn, a predominately Italian neighborhood. One son became a lawyer and New York State Assemblyman who specialized in helping other Italian immigrants. The single largest Italian-American area in the city was in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn. One forty-five-year resident of that neighborhood commented, "My parents' generation moved out, and another wave of Italian immigrants bought their houses."

- from Frederick M. Binder and David M. Reimers, "All Nations Under Heaven", p. 209
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2890
Just wanted to throw in this tidbit - in Upper Michigan, there are still Italian enclaves from back in the mining days. In Iron Mountain (population 8,000 or so) it's most pronounced, with an Italian side of town that still has excellent old Italian diners & pizza & grocery stores. Many people are bilingual in this neighborhood, even after many generations. Steve Mariucci (NFL coach/announcer) and Tom Izzo (one of college basketball's greatest coaches) are a couple Iron Mountain Italians who went to high school together. Just feels weird in the middle of the WI/UP northwoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 09:50 AM
 
56,503 posts, read 80,803,243 times
Reputation: 12480
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Just wanted to throw in this tidbit - in Upper Michigan, there are still Italian enclaves from back in the mining days. In Iron Mountain (population 8,000 or so) it's most pronounced, with an Italian side of town that still has excellent old Italian diners & pizza & grocery stores. Many people are bilingual in this neighborhood, even after many generations. Steve Mariucci (NFL coach/announcer) and Tom Izzo (one of college basketball's greatest coaches) are a couple Iron Mountain Italians who went to high school together. Just feels weird in the middle of the WI/UP northwoods.
Yes, the Upper Peninsula of MI has quite a few towns with pretty high Italian percentages. Macomb County, NE of Detroit and eastern Oakland County has some as well. Michigan Italian as First Ancestry Population Percentage City Rank Based on ACS 2008-2012 data*
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 11:15 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Just wanted to throw in this tidbit - in Upper Michigan, there are still Italian enclaves from back in the mining days. In Iron Mountain (population 8,000 or so) it's most pronounced, with an Italian side of town that still has excellent old Italian diners & pizza & grocery stores. Many people are bilingual in this neighborhood, even after many generations. Steve Mariucci (NFL coach/announcer) and Tom Izzo (one of college basketball's greatest coaches) are a couple Iron Mountain Italians who went to high school together. Just feels weird in the middle of the WI/UP northwoods.
That's true in northern Ontario as well - Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury and Thunder Bay have large Italian populations. Right in the middle of stereotypical "hoser" country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2890
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
That's true in northern Ontario as well - Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury and Thunder Bay have large Italian populations. Right in the middle of stereotypical "hoser" country.
Canadian Shield, atsa lotsa eyeties, eh? Yoopers have several yooperized Italian dishes that you can find throughout that area of MI, like Cudighi sausage.

It all goes back to mining...also, in the UP/northern WI woods there are remnents of other cultures that moved in to mine, like the Cornish pasties that are seemingly required in every small city in the region.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 11:53 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926
Italian immigration by year 1820-1975:

Italian Americans
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,848 posts, read 7,793,965 times
Reputation: 9469
Wilmington has a vibrant Little Italy, with lots of businesses and restaurants as well as a rather large festival held by St Anthony's every spring: Visit Little Italy in Wilmington, Delaware
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 12:23 PM
 
56,503 posts, read 80,803,243 times
Reputation: 12480
This is another unsuspecting community with a high Italian population: Independence, LA Population and Races

Louisiana has quite few communities with high Italian percentages: Louisiana Italian as First Ancestry Population Percentage City Rank Based on ACS 2008-2012 data*
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top