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Old 08-26-2014, 02:24 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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St. Louis should be looked at. The Hill neighborhood remains thoroughly Italian to this day, and they even still sell a locally printed newspaper that's in Italian. I'm not sure what the percentage of Italians in the city and the greater metro still speak Italian though.

Edit: Never mind. I just checked. The percentages are less than one for both the city and the county. Good for the few remaining speakers to manage to have a paper though, I guess. I can't say I'm terribly surprised at the numbers though when it comes to speakers. St. Louis' Italian community has been there a very long time, so a lot of people are 3rd, 4th, or even 5th generation at this point.
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:01 PM
 
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What an interesting sounding neighborhood. Like the tri-color fire hydrant.

The Hill, St. Louis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According the MLA site zip code 63110 had 200 Italian speakers, 1.1% of the population. The zip code is 8% Italian. Wikipedia says The Hill neighborhood (population 2,400) is "three quarters Italian" but provides no source for that claim.
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:48 PM
 
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Waterbury, Connecticut is 17% Italian American. It includes 1 zip code (06708) that was 5.3% Italian speaking. In addition the suburban town of Watertown is 45% Italian American and was 5.7% Italian speaking. With Waterbury is Oakville CDP which was 7.7% Italian speaking.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:05 PM
 
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2 places in Rhode Island.

Johnston, near Providence, is about 50% Italian and 5.3% were Italian speaking.

And Westerly is 35% Italian and was 7.3% Italian speaking.
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:33 PM
 
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In 2010, 3 counties were at least 2% Italian speaking, all in New York: Richmond (3.1%) Nassau (2.5%) and Westchester (2.3%). Bergen and Passaic come just short of 2%.
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Old 09-17-2014, 09:07 PM
 
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Here's an interview with the founder and president of the Staten Island Italian Cultural Foundation, whose parents immigrated to the US in 1960. She says that she grew up among many first generation Italians in the Bronx, but there were fewer "Italian Italians" on Staten Island:

Quote:
I was born and raised in The Bronx. I remember that I was surrounded by other Italian families, and every one of those, like mine, tried to keep alive the Italian traditions: their vegetable, fruit and herb plants in the garden, making wine, speaking Italian at home ... It was like growing up in a small town in Italy ... Then In 1993, when I came to Staten Island, newly married, I got to know the Italian community here and I noticed that there were many second, third or even fourth generation Italians, but no (or very few) first generation Italians. Many Staten Islanders, of Italian origin, have grandparents or even great-grandparents emigrating from Italy to the US, but not their parents, like me. So their relationship with Italy is not as strong and there is a dis-connect to what it really means to be "Italian". Unfortunately all they have been exposed to is the negative stereotypes against Italy and the Italians. Casa Belvedere fills that void, that need to connect to their roots and learn about the true Italian story! Ours is a very big community, something like 175,000 people!
Casa Belvedere: representing the Italian community in Staten Island

Last edited by King of Kensington; 09-17-2014 at 09:32 PM..
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Old 09-17-2014, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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We speak Italian in my family when we're extremely angry, or when don't want the littlest members of the family to know whatw talking about.
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:41 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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My neighborhood in Mt. Vernon, which borders the Bronx, still has 1,000 Italian speakers. I wonder what that will be in ten years, though. When I was growing up in the 80s the Italian community here was much as the Casa Belvedere founder described. Enough that I dispute people who say Italian-Americans are 'indistinguishable from any other American'. Well, not where I grew up. But if the area does not get any significant new immigration (there is a tiny trickle still) I fear the ethnic Italian-American is indeed doomed.
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Old 09-18-2014, 11:12 AM
 
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Born in Italy:

New York MSA 127,433
Chicago MSA 20,874
Boston MSA 17,405
Philadelphia MSA 13,456
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Old 09-18-2014, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Some "Little Italies" compared (Italian spoken at home from 2000 census and Italian American population in brackets, from zipatlas.com)

02113 (North End, Boston), 10.5% (36%)
19147 (Italian Market, Philadelphia), 2.7% (22%)
02903 (Federal Hill, Providence), 2.2% (15%)
60607 (Taylor Street, Chicago), 1.8% (9%)
10013 (Manhattan), 1.3% (8%)
94133 (North Beach, San Francisco), 1.3% (6%)
44106 (Cleveland), 0.6% (6%)
21202 (Baltimore), 0.5% (3%)

Note this is specifically the "Little Italy" district or equivalent, not urban Italian neighborhoods. Boston really stands out here.
I know the Cleveland Little Italy probably only covers about 20% of the actual 44106 zip code, and the other neighborhoods in that zip code are VERY different. However, Cleveland's Little Italy does have a pretty authentic feel to it and it's a cool neighborhood. I bring this up because with some of the others the zip code only covers the actual "Little Italy" district and not much else.
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