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Old 09-18-2014, 11:47 AM
 
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I was in Italy in the summer of 2011 and while in Anacapri, I met an elderly shop owner who asked me where in America I was from, in broken English. I answered New Jersey and she said, "Ahh, lots of Italians there." I found it amusing that she knew that - though I assume it's mostly based off stereotypical TV shows like The Sopranos and any Mafia stereotypes that surround the state.
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Old 09-18-2014, 11:30 PM
 
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Italian American population:

New York MSA 2,676,023
Philadelphia MSA 843,350
Boston MSA 683,007
Chicago MSA 682,579

Speak Italian at home:

New York MSA 242,396
Chicago MSA 38,001
Boston MSA 37,068
Philadelphia MSA 32,651

Born in Italy:

New York MSA 127,433
Chicago MSA 20,874
Boston MSA 17,405
Philadelphia MSA 13,456
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Old 09-19-2014, 07:50 AM
 
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I haven't seen the Bloomfield section of Pittsburgh mentioned here yet. Even though a lot of Italians have moved during the past decades to suburbs or nearby city hoods, it still has a high percentage of Italians, at 29.1% (zip code 15224). 2.3% speak Italian at home.
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Old 09-19-2014, 09:35 AM
 
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The Hill in St. Louis is a compact but populous Italian enclave that is over 80% Italian (descent). The relatively low Italian numbers in the zip code are misleading-- 63110 covers a lot more than just the Hill.
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Old 09-19-2014, 01:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
The Hill in St. Louis is a compact but populous Italian enclave that is over 80% Italian (descent). The relatively low Italian numbers in the zip code are misleading-- 63110 covers a lot more than just the Hill.
The census tract that The Hill is in is slightly under 40%, which is still pretty high and probably varies in terms of percentage within the census tract: Census Tract 113500 in Saint Louis City County, Missouri

Also, keep in mind that the percentage is for first ancestry. So, there are probably other people that are of substantial Italian descent.
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Old 09-19-2014, 03:07 PM
 
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You've got it down to a census tract of 2,000 people, which is pretty good.

The reason I did zip codes was because it's the smallest level I could get within large cities for language.
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Old 09-25-2014, 05:20 PM
 
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Did Italian immigrants popularize soccer in the US?

Quote:
If Anne coulter is correct that “No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer,” then it is because very few Italian Americans had great-grandfathers who were born here. She is worried that soccer will inhibit the assimilation of new immigrants, and I share her concern as I think assimilation and integration are important for the future of our country. But I don’t think soccer is to be feared. If Italians are an example, there is nothing to worry about. Soccer never replaced baseball in the North End, nor will it ever. On the contrary, soccer is becoming an American sport. If it is has faults, it is the same faults plaguing all sports that become corrupted by greed, government-corporatism, and the forgetting of the family. These are not the sins of immigrants only, or only of those whose great-grandfathers were born in the United States.
When calcio first came to the North End | Bostoniano.info
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Old 09-25-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: The City
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King a little off tangent but is soccer big (bigger than US which to me is secondary sport in general for watching maybe the most played by youth oddly) in Canada - just curious
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Old 04-19-2015, 01:09 AM
 
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When did Bensonhurst become an Italian neighborhood? According to this article it was more Jewish than Italian until the 1950s and 1960s. So its Italian character was really established by postwar immigration, rather than second settlement area type development during the 1920s.

Quote:
"We never used to have gyros or Mexican food," Bensonhurst resident Rose Poveromo confided from behind the fried-dough booth she was manning on Thursday. "It was all Italian."

The 62-year-old blonde with long, manicured nails, a half-dozen gold chains and a diamond-encrusted nameplate hanging from her neck-has lived in the same building off 18th Avenue since 1970, and watched the neighborhood change from "Little Italy to Little Odessa to Chinatown."

"When I moved into my building 38 years ago, everyone was Italian and I was the only American-speaking person who lived there," she said. "Thirty-eight years later, Iím still the only American speaker, but they all speak Russian, Polish and Albanian."

Italian Bensonhurst stalwarts all tell a similar story: The children of the first-generation immigrants who flooded Bensonhurst in the 1960s began to trickle out to Staten Island and New Jersey more than a decade ago, shrugging off their parentsí working-class roots in favor of the suburbs. Locals report that the migration has been gaining steam since the 2000 Census. Then, the number of residents of Italian descent in Bensonhurst had already shrunk to 59,112, almost half as many as two decades ago, mirroring citywide trends; the total Italian population in the city dropped from over a million two decades ago to 700,000 in 2,000.

"This neighborhood used to be thick with Italians," said Bensonhurst broker Joseph Di Fiore of Century 21 Calabrese. "Now they are moving out because theyíre retiring. Itís normal."

The Local: Bensonhurst







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Old 04-19-2015, 01:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
King a little off tangent but is soccer big (bigger than US which to me is secondary sport in general for watching maybe the most played by youth oddly) in Canada - just curious
To answer your question from half a year ago: I'd say it's about the same. It's most popular among immigrant communities, but it's become more popular among long established Canadians too. Toronto is a very lively place during World Cup seasons as the various diasporas here cheer for their home team.
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