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View Poll Results: Which states do you believe belong in the Mid-Atlantic region?
New York 75 61.48%
New Jersey 87 71.31%
Pennsylvania 88 72.13%
Delaware 92 75.41%
Maryland 92 75.41%
Virginia 60 49.18%
West Virginia 25 20.49%
North Carolina 15 12.30%
Other (please specify) 4 3.28%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 122. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-08-2014, 01:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I'm afraid I agree with her. Baltimore feels very similar to northern cities and quite different from southern cities, as I experience them. You seem to feel Baltimore is a southern city, however, if I am reading your posts correctly. Why is that? Do you, for example, feel Baltimore is more similar to Philly or Norfolk?
Didn't seem that way to me, though obviously there are similarities in built form. Though I suspect as someone from the south, your perspective is different from me (who's seen little of the south). Smaller differences stand out more.
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Old 09-08-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Didn't seem that way to me, though obviously there are similarities in built form. Though I suspect as someone from the south, your perspective is different from me (who's seen little of the south). Smaller differences stand out more.
If your benchmark for a "southern" city is Jackson, MS or Macon, GA, then Baltimore will feel and look very different. If your benchmark is Richmond or Hampton Roads, then Baltimore, and especially DC, will not look and feel so different. Architecturally, Norfolk and Richmond are really different from any other southern cities. They resemble DC and some areas of New England more than they do anywhere in, say, Alabama.

If your benchmark for a "northern" city is Brooklyn, New York, for example, then Baltimore and DC will also feel very different.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
If your benchmark for a "southern" city is Jackson, MS or Macon, GA, then Baltimore will feel and look very different. If your benchmark is Richmond or Hampton Roads, then Baltimore, and especially DC, will not look and feel so different. Architecturally, Norfolk and Richmond are really different from any other southern cities. They resemble DC and some areas of New England more than they do anywhere in, say, Alabama.

If your benchmark for a "northern" city is Brooklyn, New York, for example, then Baltimore and DC will also feel very different.
If you use Brooklyn, then every other northern city would feel very different too. In my opinion, from what I've seen of Richmond and Norfolk, Baltimore is very different. The only similarities that I've seen with from Norfolk was the waterfront; however, that's because Harborplace, and Norfolk's waterfront was developed by the same company. Richmond even though it has rowhouses, felt very different than Baltimore. It had an " old south" feel to it. Still, Baltimore is a very southern city.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
If you use Brooklyn, then every other northern city would feel very different too.
No, it wouldn't. Brooklyn is not exactly the same as Philadelphia, but there are many similarities that go beyond the built form. Extremely strong Italian influence. Large Puerto Rican communities. Old school pizza joints and bodegas, etc. Part of the reason I prefer Brooklyn over the other boroughs is that it reminds me most of home.


Philly vs Brooklyn - YouTube
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
No, it wouldn't. Brooklyn is not exactly the same as Philadelphia, but there are many similarities that go beyond the built form. Extremely strong Italian influence. Large Puerto Rican communities. Old school pizza joints and bodegas, etc. Part of the reason I prefer Brooklyn over the other boroughs is that it reminds me most of home.


Philly vs Brooklyn - YouTube
Part of the reason I like Philly is because it reminds me of home, the southern city of Baltimore.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
In my opinion, from what I've seen of Richmond and Norfolk, Baltimore is very different.
"Feel" is subjective. This isn't.

New York - 30.13% of MSA (61.76% of non-Hispanic Whites)
Philadelphia - 32.67% of MSA (53.05% of non-Hispanic Whites)
Baltimore - 21.75% of MSA (36.28% of non-Hispanic Whites)

When I think of Philly, even in predominantly Black neighborhoods, I think of cheesesteaks, soft pretzels, pizza and Italian ice. Take, for example, Jim's on Callowhill. Or King's Water Ice near Overbrook HS. Or Vincent's on Lansdowne. When I think of Baltimore, I think of crab (which it has in common with Delmarva and the Tidewater) and the chicken box.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Part of the reason I like Philly is because it reminds me of home, the southern city of Baltimore.
And that would be correct if you shrunk the Italian/Irish and Puerto Rican populations down to negligible or non-existent, added hundreds of thousands of Whites to the MSA with roots in Tennessee, West Virginia and North Carolina, and increased a more southern-influenced AA population to a firm majority of the city and a plurality within the MSA. There are more Blacks in the Baltimore MSA than there are Irish, Italians, Jews and Hispanics combined.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Feel" is subjective. This isn't.

New York - 30.13% of MSA (61.76% of non-Hispanic Whites)
Philadelphia - 32.67% of MSA (53.05% of non-Hispanic Whites)
Baltimore - 21.75% of MSA (36.28% of non-Hispanic Whites)

When I think of Philly, even in predominantly Black neighborhoods, I think of cheesesteaks, pizza and Italian ice. Take, for example, Jim's on Callowhill. Or King's Water Ice near Overbrook HS. Or Vincent's on Lansdowne. When I think of Baltimore, I think of crab (which it has in common with Delmarva and the Tidewater) and the chicken box.
Did you choose NYC because it is 61.76% of non-hispanic white? If not then you've admittedly said that it feels like Philly. What I'm seeing in your post is a bit of confirmation bias. Anything not associated with Italian, Irish, and Puerto Rican, you dismiss. You know that Philly is majority black though, so...I don't get that. The black neighborhoods in Philly serve the same foods as any other city Chicken boxes included. Philly has chicken restaurants that are HUGE in the south that Baltimore doesn't even have, like Church's. Chicken and Chinese carry outs are Huge in black neighborhoods across the country..fact.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Didn't seem that way to me, though obviously there are similarities in built form. Though I suspect as someone from the south, your perspective is different from me (who's seen little of the south). Smaller differences stand out more.
It's always interesting to me when two people can look at the same thing and see something different. To correct you, I live in Philly. I have also lived in Boston, Wilmington, Hampton Roads and Houston, among other places. Eight of my mother's siblings lived and raised their families in Baltimore, so when growing up, we visited them on a monthly (or so) schedule. Additionally, I have visited all 50 states. So these experiences of course contribute to how I form my views around the thread topic.

It seems, if I read you correctly, you have spent little time in the south. If you are lucky enough to do so in the future, you may (or may not!) characterize Baltimore differently.
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Old 09-08-2014, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Did you choose NYC because it is 61.76% of non-hispanic white?
That's not what that means. That means 61.76% of non-Hispanic Whites are Italian, Irish, Polish or Jewish. Are you in high school?

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
If not then you've admittedly said that it feels like Philly. What I'm seeing in your post is a bit of confirmation bias. Anything not associated with Italian, Irish, and Puerto Rican, you dismiss.
Right...except for the part I just mentioned a few minutes ago about the large Black population.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
You know that Philly is majority black though, so...I don't get that.
No, it's not. Philly is 43% Black. Baltimore is 64% Black. If we can't get basic, easily accessible facts straight, we can't even have a conversation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
The black neighborhoods in Philly serve the same foods as any other city Chicken boxes included. Philly has chicken restaurants that are HUGE in the south that Baltimore doesn't even have, like Church's. Chicken and Chinese carry outs are Huge in black neighborhoods across the country..fact.
I didn't say that Philly didn't have soul food restaurants. I said that the Black neighborhoods sell two of the city's staples--cheesesteaks and water ice. That's something that ALL Philadelphians have in common regardless of ethnicity. And the chicken box in the average Baltimore neighborhood is the equivalent of the cheesesteak in the average Philadelphia neighborhood. It's a part of Baltimore's identity as much as the crabcake is.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71cvol-Y6ZI

Last edited by BajanYankee; 09-08-2014 at 03:18 PM..
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