U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which states do you believe belong in the Mid-Atlantic region?
New York 75 61.48%
New Jersey 87 71.31%
Pennsylvania 88 72.13%
Delaware 92 75.41%
Maryland 92 75.41%
Virginia 60 49.18%
West Virginia 25 20.49%
North Carolina 15 12.30%
Other (please specify) 4 3.28%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 122. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-26-2014, 04:02 PM
 
346 posts, read 757,452 times
Reputation: 287

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I've gotten quite a few responses. Thank you. Except for the last couple of posts, most have only offered your views on which states comprise the Mid-Atlantic region. In my OP, I also asked you to share your reasons why you selected the states you did. If it's only geographic location - so be it. If there are common characteristics beyond geography, however, I would be interested in hearing your views on those as well. History? Topography? Climate? Accents? Demographics? Vegetation & agriculture? In other words, what separates the Mid-Atlantic states from those in New England and those further south? Is it only that they are 'in the middle" or is there more?

Thanks.
I selected VA/DC/MD/DE as the core areas of the mid-atlantic due to geography and having a culture that is a mixture of northern and southern elements (look at the debates about any of the aforementioned areas as far as being culturally southern, in 2014, throughout the forums). I believe the eastern and northern portions of VA (NOVA, Richmond, Tidewater/Eastern Shore) are more connected with areas of DC/MD/DE than the western and southside areas of VA as far as accents, architecture, demographics, and culture are concerned. I view NYC as a northeastern city (not Mid-Atlantic or New England) and Raleigh as a southeastern city.

Last edited by Kbank007; 08-26-2014 at 04:21 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-26-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,854 posts, read 7,802,585 times
Reputation: 9473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
Middle Colonies(NY,NJ,&PA) + Upper South Atlantic(DEL,MD,&VA) = Modern Day Mid Atlantic!
Delaware was a Middle Colony along with the other three you noted (Middle Colonies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). Not sure if that changes your post in any way, but wanted to clarify the history.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 05:36 PM
 
781 posts, read 1,094,681 times
Reputation: 609
Very true post I put it with South Atlantic because of how the census defines it, I did not mean to leave it out of Middle Colonies I stand corrected .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,247 posts, read 19,545,740 times
Reputation: 13002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
The name is also extremely common in the Norfolk/Va Beach/Tidewater area of Virginia for organizations, businesses, and networks.
That sounds about right and what I would expect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 03:38 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,220 posts, read 17,960,186 times
Reputation: 14658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
WV does need to fit somewhere but finding that spot is a challenge. While you see it fitting better with PA, MD and VA, you omitted OH, a state it shares quite a long border with. I'd therefore toss OH into the mix, as well. I've spent my share of time in Parkersburg, and I noted little difference when I crossed the river to places like Marietta.
I think West Virginia is still more like Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia than Ohio. First of all, we need to remember that West Virginia was once part of Virginia. Seconf of all, the Appalachian portion of Ohio is an anomaly, and it tends to be a forgotten region within the state. It's also very thinly populated; Youngstown is the only major population center in Appalachian Ohio, and even then, it straddles geologic regions. (The northern and western suburbs of Youngstown are much flatter than the southern and eastern suburbs.) The highest point in Ohio is less than 2,000' above sea level, whereas the highest points in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia are all over 3,000' above sea level. And outside the Appalachian Plateau, Ohio is quintessentially Midwestern, and the rural areas are heavily agricultural, while there's very little agriculture anywhere in West Virginia. Basically, what I'm trying to say is, including West Virginia with the Midwest makes no sense to me. If anything, it's split between the interior South and the interior Northeast. And since it's far enough east to be significantly impacted by nor'easters, I have no problem classifying it as part of the Mid-Atlantic either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 06:27 AM
 
Location: 304
5,093 posts, read 6,860,647 times
Reputation: 1697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
WV does need to fit somewhere but finding that spot is a challenge. While you see it fitting better with PA, MD and VA, you omitted OH, a state it shares quite a long border with. I'd therefore toss OH into the mix, as well. I've spent my share of time in Parkersburg, and I noted little difference when I crossed the river to places like Marietta. As I see it, WV is an Appalachian state. But WV is the only state I see that fits entirely into Appalachia - a region that extends from New York to Alabama encompassing only parts of those other states. WV kinda stands alone in that position of being fully Appalachian. Given that, we can't take just one state and assign it to its own region . . . can we? WV may be our most hybridized state of all - partly Mid-Atlantic, partly southern, partly midwestern and fully Appalachian. It seems it might make it a culturally interesting state in which to live.
It is! I'm from the Charleston/Huntington area, which IMO seems more Midwestern/Ohio like culturally, but certainly Appalachian as well. The Eastern Panhandle is the more similar to Maryland and Virginia, with part of that being bedroom communities for DC. North Central WV and the Northern Panhandle are very PA influenced culturally. And Southern WV is like KY and Southern VA with your Southern influences but mostly typical Appalachian.

If we were to just divide states based on North and South, I consider WV a Northern state. We are more industrial, have a colder climate, and have stronger ties with Ohio and PA to our north then we do with economics in the south. With that being said, its hard to solely place WV in one area because it is the crossroads for many regions. That is why Mid Atlantic is a good region for WV.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 07:35 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,247 posts, read 19,545,740 times
Reputation: 13002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I think West Virginia is still more like Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia than Ohio. First of all, we need to remember that West Virginia was once part of Virginia. Seconf of all, the Appalachian portion of Ohio is an anomaly, and it tends to be a forgotten region within the state. It's also very thinly populated; Youngstown is the only major population center in Appalachian Ohio, and even then, it straddles geologic regions. (The northern and western suburbs of Youngstown are much flatter than the southern and eastern suburbs.) The highest point in Ohio is less than 2,000' above sea level, whereas the highest points in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia are all over 3,000' above sea level. And outside the Appalachian Plateau, Ohio is quintessentially Midwestern, and the rural areas are heavily agricultural, while there's very little agriculture anywhere in West Virginia. Basically, what I'm trying to say is, including West Virginia with the Midwest makes no sense to me. If anything, it's split between the interior South and the interior Northeast. And since it's far enough east to be significantly impacted by nor'easters, I have no problem classifying it as part of the Mid-Atlantic either.
I'd say this is mainly correct. I consider West Virginia to be almost evenly split between northeast/southeast Appalachia. The southern part of the state is where southern culture, accents and baptists are much more prevalent.

The hesitation I have in calling West Virginia mid-Atlantic is that it doesn't seem to have much of a cultural connection to the Atlantic coast. Do West Virginians typically go to the beach at least every summer? That would make the designation more credible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,401 posts, read 19,422,969 times
Reputation: 11278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
^^^ I am aware of that short Wikipedia link. It contains the following quote: "There are differing interpretations as to the composition of the Mid-Atlantic." That's why I thought it would be interesting to poll CD'ers on this, but even more interesting to hear their reasons why.
There is Mid-Atlantic geographically, and Mid-Atlantic culturally.

Geographically, they're the states in the middle of the Atlantic coast, probably from NJ down to NC. You'll hear The Weather Channel, for example, use this term when talking about where a particular front or storm is going. It does not mean by any stretch that NC and NJ are the same culturally (thank God).

Culturally, it generally refers to NY to Washington, DC--between New England an The South. Northern VA is Mid-Atlantic, but Virginia as a whole is not, if you're classifying only by state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,242,183 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post
There is Mid-Atlantic geographically, and Mid-Atlantic culturally.
What is Mid-Atlantic culture? Is that anything that's not southern?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,424 posts, read 12,419,193 times
Reputation: 4857
Pennsylvania more Mid-Atlantic than New York
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top