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Old 08-27-2014, 06:14 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Oh, absolutely! But the post after yours, by LordHomunculus, is a good example of what I was hoping to see in this thread; I doubt many people would associate Orlando with historic districts.
You can get a sense of how much old housing stock a city has by checking the housing stats from the Census Quickfacts. For Northampton, the town I posted, 464% of the housing is before 1939 (earliest date available for the census, though there's a separate housing survey which has pre-1920 data for some cities and metros), compared to Massachusetts as a whole which is 35% (Florida is only 2% !).
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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In Detroit, most move-in ready historic homes go for around $300K-$400K depending on the size obviously. At the bottom of the recession they were going for almost $100K and of course the fixer-uppers were even cheaper than that. Still, comparable to most big cities (and even Detroit's own suburbs) these homes are a steal. There's only one or two mansions in all of Detroit for sale over a million dollars.

The most intact historic neighborhoods are Palmer Woods and Indian Village. There quite a few others, but they've notably had more post-war infill over the years. Plus the homes are much smaller though not any less ornate.

Curbed Detroit: Indian Village Archives

Home sales up in Detroit's Indian Village, other historic mansion areas | Detroit Free Press | freep.com


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68YdCgD28A4
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Oh, absolutely! But the post after yours, by LordHomunculus, is a good example of what I was hoping to see in this thread; I doubt many people would associate Orlando with historic districts.
I agree. Great shots LH! (+1)

How abut you OP? Youngstown is a fairly old city as cities go in the US and a city not many of us know a lot about. Can you show some scenes of the older historical areas in your city?
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Old 08-27-2014, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I agree. Great shots LH! (+1)

How abut you OP? Youngstown is a fairly old city as cities go in the US and a city not many of us know a lot about. Can you show some scenes of the older historical areas in your city?
Here is my unabridged Youngstown picture thread: What Youngstown looks like to me (in pictures - LOTS!)

Here is a recent post, from that thread, featuring the Wick Park Neighborhood: http://www.city-data.com/forum/35999567-post82.html
It's hard for me to say what a house would sell for in this neighborhood, because there is such a broad range of condition and size. And, there have been few--if any--move in ready, fully restored/renovated homes sold. (per Zillow)

I'd like to add that there are lots of old house neighborhoods in Youngstown. This is from the Fifth Ave. Historic District: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.1300...i4kOFPfONg!2e0

This is nearby at Crandall Park: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.1251...PWJ7g9KOzQ!2e0

This is in the Idora Neighborhood, on the south side: https://www.google.com/maps/@41.0817...gntJ0Go_YA!2e0

Last edited by JR_C; 08-27-2014 at 07:19 PM..
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Old 08-27-2014, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Here is my unabridged Youngstown picture thread: What Youngstown looks like to me (in pictures - LOTS!)

Here is a recent post, from that thread, featuring the Wick Park Neighborhood: http://www.city-data.com/forum/35999567-post82.html
I really enjoyed the pix. It's obvious from them that you appreciate the beauty of your city, particularly in some of the detail shots you took of the commercial buildings. The downtown is larger than I imagined Youngstown to be. And the houses certainly give off that all-American vibe. They recall the homes in I remember from my time in Kansas City many years ago.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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This is a cool thread. Thanks, OP!
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Oh, absolutely! But the post after yours, by LordHomunculus, is a good example of what I was hoping to see in this thread; I doubt many people would associate Orlando with historic districts.
Sure, and I apologize for not including more pics; most of my older shots from the south are buried on hard drives and my current laptop is mostly filled with landscape scenery since moving to Colorado. If I get the chance I'll dig through some hard drives and post more pics!
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:37 AM
 
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Some more, but not all of them are in the same city:
http://goo.gl/maps/pyBwc
Time Cap Development Corp - The 5 Sisters Park Avenue
Home HeadQuarters

Both of these districts also have apartments:
Montgomery Street-Columbus Circle Historic District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Montgomery Street-Columbus Circle Historic District, Syracuse City, Onondaga County, Syracuse NY 13202
http://goo.gl/maps/hhh1X

North Salina Street Historic District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
North Salina Street Historic District, Syracuse City, Onondaga County, Syracuse NY 13208
http://goo.gl/maps/D9bR8

Others I'm familiar with:
South Street Area Historic District, Auburn City, Cayuga County, Auburn NY 13021
South Street Area Historic District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://goo.gl/maps/su4Ft

West Side Neighborhood Association [WSNA]
http://goo.gl/maps/tjUJk

Near Westside Neighborhood Association, Inc.
"Historic Near Westside Neighborhood Elmira NY"
http://goo.gl/maps/QfPSQ

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 08-28-2014 at 01:16 AM..
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:57 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,080,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Here is my unabridged Youngstown picture thread: What Youngstown looks like to me (in pictures - LOTS!)

Here is a recent post, from that thread, featuring the Wick Park Neighborhood: http://www.city-data.com/forum/35999567-post82.html
It's hard for me to say what a house would sell for in this neighborhood, because there is such a broad range of condition and size. And, there have been few--if any--move in ready, fully restored/renovated homes sold. (per Zillow)
The downtown had taller buildings than I expected. Some of those houses looked very nice. A lot could fit in here, a bit more spread out (or at least set back from the road) and a little more brick than Massachusetts old neighborhoods. Here's another local town I took photos of: Holyoke, MA. An old industrial town, and for New England, has some of the worst decay issues in the downtown area (not sure, might have missed some cities). Homes in decent shape are mixed with some abandoned ones. It's also one of the few gridded cities in New England. Old church:



For sale for $300,000:



A block away. Not the cutest, but looks in decent shape. Plenty of old neighborhoods aren't cute, of course.


Brick sorta-rowhouses in the sense only a few units are attached. More common than block-length rowhouses in New England. I like the ivy, though it might be bad for the structure:



Another shot of the ivy house:



More typical old homes, out of wood, in the same neighborhood:



Former Catholic high school downtown needs help, I wonder if there's a chance it might be reused? There were a few abandoned homes not too far that I would have taken a photo of but sketchy looking characters nearby dissuaded me.



A street downtown with some of the rowhouses used as shopfronts.



Downtown commercial street. Downtown seems a bit dead, though it looks even deader in the picture since it was Sunday morning. Restaurant on the right is a Puerto Rican restaurant.



Makes no sense to show an old city without its old mill buildings. Ye olde mill town:



on the canal. This one is still used for something:



Lastly, here's a view of Northampton (shown previously) from the top of a small mountain:


Last edited by nei; 01-15-2016 at 03:04 PM..
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Old 08-28-2014, 08:47 AM
 
56,807 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The downtown had taller buildings than I expected. Some of those houses looked very nice. A lot could fit in here, a bit more spread out (or at least set back from the road) and a little more brick than Massachusetts old neighborhoods. Here's another local town I took photos of: Holyoke, MA. An old industrial town, and for New England, has some of the worst decay issues in the downtown area (not sure, might have missed some cities). Homes in decent shape are mixed with some abandoned ones. It's also one of the few gridded cities in New England. Old church:



For sale for $300,000:



A block away. Not the cutest, but looks in decent shape. Plenty of old neighborhoods aren't cute, of course.


Brick sorta-rowhouses in the sense only a few units are attached. More common than block-length rowhouses in New England. I like the ivy, though it might be bad for the structure:



Another shot of the ivy house:



More typical old homes, out of wood, in the same neighborhood:



Former Catholic high school downtown needs help, I wonder if there's a chance it might be reused? There were a few abandoned homes not too far that I would have taken a photo of but sketchy looking characters nearby dissuaded me.



A street downtown with some of the rowhouses used as shopfronts.



Downtown commercial street. Downtown seems a bit dead, though it looks even deader in the picture since it was Sunday morning. Restaurant on the right is a Puerto Rican restaurant.



Makes no sense to show an old city with its old mill buildings. Ye olde mill town:



on the canal. This one is still used for something:



Lastly, here's a view of Northampton (shown previously) from the top of a small mountain:
Nice pictures, nei! Holyoke is screaming for someone to use its potential.
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