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Old 08-28-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,401,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
This is a cool thread. Thanks, OP!
Yes, please don't let anyone ruin it as is usually the case!

I'd post Milwaukee, but I'm not from here and feel like I'd miss out on important details. Lots of great old buildings and houses around town, though.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:11 AM
 
1,428 posts, read 1,823,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
You can get a sense of how much old housing stock a city has by checking the housing stats from the Census Quickfacts. For Northampton, the town I posted, 464% of the housing is before 1939 (earliest date available for the census, though there's a separate housing survey which has pre-1920 data for some cities and metros), compared to Massachusetts as a whole which is 35% (Florida is only 2% !).
Pretty much. Compared to other states, Florida isn't going to have much housing stock that was built before 1939, so it's going to be more rare to find historic homes and neighborhoods.

Out of the major cities (200,000+) in Florida, Miami has the largest percentage of homes that were built before 1939. But historic towns like Key West and St. Augustine are going to have a larger percentage of older homes.

Percentage of homes built before 1939. Census 5-year estimates (had to use 5-year estimates because St. Augustine doesn't have 1-year or 3-year data):

St. Augustine - 27.4%
Key West - 19.3%
United States - 13.7%
Miami - 10.4%
St. Pete - 8.7%
Tampa - 8.5%
Jacksonville - 5.1%
Orlando - 4.2%
Florida - 2.2%
Hialeah - 1.1%

Miami gets a huge percentage boost if we include homes built between 1940-49. OTOH, Jacksonville has plenty of historic neighborhoods near its center, but a lot of JAX also consist of newer neighborhoods and sprawl (Jacksonville pretty much annexed most of Duval), so that will bring down its percentage.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,865 posts, read 7,811,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Yes, please don't let anyone ruin it as is usually the case!

I'd post Milwaukee, but I'm not from here and feel like I'd miss out on important details. Lots of great old buildings and houses around town, though.
Hey - if you've got pix, post them! I've only been to Milwaukee once and stayed downtown. I'd love to see some of the older neighborhoods. I suspect there are lots of grand Victorians.
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, VA.
867 posts, read 1,089,428 times
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Lochhaven


Riverview
...late 19th early 20th in Norfolk Downtown area was considered "Norfolk" and everything else was considered "suburb." In modern times the shire has accumulated several of these type of "suburbs" to make up its city limits.


Colonial Place
...more dense than Lochhaven even though this vid barely displays this well. A quieter Ghent.


Larchmont


West Freemason
...closer to Downtown...some pre civil war buildings. Alot of "this" type of Norfolk was torn down and called "slums" in the 50's,60's after having survived being bombed by the British, SMH. This place is now a Historic district as is many of these neighborhoods now. This little district was recognized as one of The Great Places in America:Neighborhoods by the APA.


Ghent
....probably the most trendy neighborhood folks can afford, very popular in the region. Almost totally demolished as "slums." also.


...more WF & Ghent(skip to 37:00)....bike dude has a better viewcam but I'd skip to 37:00 when he begins to enter West Freemason on to Ghent.


....more Ghent....they started out good til they took a back street(22nd). But, the bike dudes got good travelin music.

Cant find any of West Ghent.


Olde Towne Portsmouth
....17th century homes

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.8386...ekQsM_aoeQ!2e0 oldest being early 1600's if Im not mistaken.


story of the Hill House.
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:57 PM
 
32,103 posts, read 33,010,060 times
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In NYC there are different parts of the city that older areas. I would include the Downtown/Financial District in Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights in Brooklyn, Forest Hills Gardens in Queens and parts of several other neighborhoods around the city,
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Old 08-28-2014, 01:01 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,008,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
In NYC there are different parts of the city that older areas. I would include the Downtown/Financial District in Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights in Brooklyn, Forest Hills Gardens in Queens and parts of several other neighborhoods around the city,
A lot of Brooklyn is from before 1910, older than Forest Hill Gardens. (Most of Sunset Park and Bed-Stuy for example). It's just that a lot of it isn't cute looking. Probably at least 100 years old:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Sunse...08.46,,0,-7.21

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Sunse...308.77,,0,0.08

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Prosp...04.68,,0,-9.71

could keep going...
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:18 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,852 posts, read 21,155,925 times
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First time visitors to Kentucky are always surprised out how many nice, gentrified urban areas exist in the state's three largest urban areas (Louisville, Northern KY Cincinnati suburbs, & Lexington) given this state's rural / poor reputation.

On Google Streetview check out the following areas...

Louisville: Old Louisville (btw downtown and Univ of Louisville), The Highlands (btw downtown and I-264 along Bardstown Rd), and Frankfort Ave (due east of downtown), among others. Right across the river New Albany (near Culbertson Mansion) and Jeffersonville (Spring Street and riverside) in Indiana have some nice areas too.

NKY - Main Street & river front in Covington, Newport east of Monmouth St, Bellevue (my favorite) along Fairfield Ave

Lexington - Gratz Park, South Hill (all 3 blocks btw downtown and Univ of KY)
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,318 posts, read 6,981,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
Percentage of homes built before 1939. Census 5-year estimates (had to use 5-year estimates because St. Augustine doesn't have 1-year or 3-year data):

St. Augustine - 27.4%
Key West - 19.3%
United States - 13.7%
Miami - 10.4%
St. Pete - 8.7%
Tampa - 8.5%
Jacksonville - 5.1%
Orlando - 4.2%
Florida - 2.2%
Hialeah - 1.1%

Miami gets a huge percentage boost if we include homes built between 1940-49. OTOH, Jacksonville has plenty of historic neighborhoods near its center, but a lot of JAX also consist of newer neighborhoods and sprawl (Jacksonville pretty much annexed most of Duval), so that will bring down its percentage.
Nice explanation and spot on! I was going to say exactly what you said after seeing your list.

Anyway, I won't do photos because thats not my thing, but I will give a brief background and rundown:

The Jax metro (including St Augustine) is obviously the oldest city in Jax and was largely developed in the early 20th century. So plenty of historic neighborhoods, despite the fact that TONS of architecture and building stock was razed by a demolition-crazed govt over the years. First, for interstates and bridges cutting through the urban core and later in the name of gentrification (which hardly happened) So much of Downtown Jacksonville and some surrounding neighborhoods (particularly Eastside and LaVilla) are barren and empty with large swaths of dirt fields and surface parking lots.

There are two designated historic districts that are extremely well-protected (where the slightest alteration must endure multiple approvals) and demolition is nearly unfathomable. These are Riverside-Avondale (which is really two large neighborhoods with large boundaries) and Springfield. Despite the national designation (and positive recognition), Springfield has suffered from occasional demolitions due to a money-hungry local govt that used federal funds to destroy as many homes as it could deem unsafe.

Anyway, the popular historic neighborhoods are:
1) Riverside - Extremely hip and popular neighborhood. The epicenter for the diverse and progressive population, hipsters flock here for the "urban" lifestyle, creative types are attracted by the relatively low rental options, and yet some of the wealthiest folks in the city also live here in the numerous waterfront mansions and condos in the area. It was one of the primary streetcar suburbs of early Jacksonville so there are several obvious major commercial corridors but what's cool is there are also tons of other blocks that are zoned CRO so lots of other streets have retail and businesses housed in these historic homes.
2) Avondale - Similar to Riverside in feel...these two neighborhoods blend together with somewhat ambiguous boundaries. But not he whole Avondale has larger and more expensive houses, and its commercial areas are a bit more homogenous and predictable. Basically one large commercial strip and the rest of the neighborhood is strictly residential (for the most part)
3) Murray Hill - Borders Riverside and Avondale, Murray Hill was yet another very popular streetcar suburb back in its heyday. The area is still somewhat rough but has improved quite a bit in the past decade. Has three main arteries of commercial businesses running through it, but only one is really walkable. This neighborhood has the chance to be the next Riverside in the next ten years. The homes are generally quite small. A lot of 2/1 or 3/2 bungalows between 800-1200 sq ft.
4) San Marco - Like Riverside, it has very diverse housing. Being an urban core neighborhood on the river there are many multimillion dollar mansions, pricy waterfront condos, and then tiny 2/1 bungalows, all within a few blocks of each other. Also like Riverside, I'd consider it the only neighborhood that can offer a quasi-urban lifestyle, and is the only neighborhood connected to downtown by fixed transit.
5) Springfield - Huge, impressive, historic homes. Definitely the coolest housing stock imo that just makes you think old southern architecture. Mostly two stories, box shaped, with large columns or porches and lots of trees with spanish moss hanging, lol. Also a former streetcar suburb with a major commercial corridor (it's Main St. for crying out loud lol) but unfortunately the commercial corridor is perhaps in the worst shape of all the neighborhoods I've mentioned.

There are a few others, like Durkeeville, LaVilla, Eastside, etc, but those are still very far from popular at this moment in time.
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Old 08-28-2014, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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That Ivy House is a termite paradise. Someone PLEASE cut down that ivy!!!!!
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Old 08-28-2014, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,663,909 times
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Thanks for the replies everyone! Keep them coming!

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
That Ivy House is a termite paradise. Someone PLEASE cut down that ivy!!!!!
Termites are much less aggressive up north. And, maybe that's boston ivy, which is less harmful to masonry?
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