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Old 08-27-2014, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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In the Midwest and NE, I know there are lots of old/historic neighborhoods found in the biggest cities to the smallest towns. In the sunbelt, and out west, I know that some of the older cities have a few old/historic neighborhoods, but they are less common, because these cities grew mostly after WWII. (with some obvious exceptions, like New Orleans, San Francisco, Charleston, SC, etc..)

So, I'm starting this thread for those who would like to share photo tours, Google street views, websites, etc. that highlight the old and interesting neighborhoods in their city. But, I'm also interested in how accessible these neighborhoods are to the average person. Are these neighborhoods gentrified and extremely expensive, relative to newer neighborhoods? Are these neighborhoods so popular that they are in danger of being demolished and replaced with new apartment buildings? Or, maybe they're so UNpopular that they are decaying into the ground?
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Old 08-27-2014, 11:20 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Her's a town near me, Northampton. Among the oldest houses in town is a 1740 ish mansion, with extension. Probably worth about $1 million.



Most older homes are nowhere near as expensive, but ones in good condition and size do get a price premium ($300-$450k is a common price) though part of it is from being "in town". A more normal building, note it's a two family:



This probably the most "urban" street in town, at least with older buildings. A mix of wooden two and three unit homes and a stretch of brick rowhouses at one end. I find it especially photogenic after a snowstorm. Fort Hill Terrace got a historic designation but most of the street has a low qualitys streetview.
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Old 08-27-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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My town of Tyler, Texas has several historic districts - the Azalea District, the Brick Streets District, and the Charnwood district. There are a wide range of home styles and prices in all of those areas, ranging from very charming small cottages to mansions ($100,000 to $2,000,000 but most falling into the $150,000 to $350,000 range). The homes span the years from about 1855 to 1940.

Home

Charnwood District

Azalea District

Brickstreet District
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Old 08-27-2014, 11:40 AM
 
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These areas are still in demand and I'd say most are in the 125-500,000 dollar range, with some as low as 80,000 and maybe as high as 900,000 tops.

Greater Strathmore Neighborhood Association
http://goo.gl/maps/CINb0

SEDGWICK FARM NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION
http://goo.gl/maps/IAB6z

Berkeley Park
http://goo.gl/maps/bGzYv

http://www.wenanation.org/Westcott%2...0Scottholm.pdf
http://goo.gl/maps/9ttbF

There are other areas that have a similar look, but aren't necessarily in defined districts. You can find similar neighborhoods in suburban villages or in older suburban areas as well. Here's an example: https://m.facebook.com/DeWittshireNY...le.com%2F&_rdr
http://goo.gl/maps/GQvr2

This is another district that is somewhat gentrified by some in the local LGBT community: Welcome to the District of Hawley-Green!
Hawley-Green Historic District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://goo.gl/maps/3vIvS

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 08-27-2014 at 12:06 PM..
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,959 posts, read 3,825,812 times
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Pioneer Square, Seattle
It was once the heart of the city: Seattle's founders settled there in 1852. The early structures in the neighborhood were mostly wooden, and nearly all burned in the Great Seattle Fire of 1889. By the end of 1890, dozens of brick and stone buildings had been erected in their stead; to this day, the architectural character of the neighborhood derives from these late 19th century buildings, mostly examples of Richardsonian Romanesque. The neighborhood today is registered as a National Historic District.

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6018...unv39kFHkQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6009...1Vzy5w2T_A!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6017...hR58P6PgCw!2e0
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,817,078 times
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Well, Philly's pretty old. It claims Elfreth's Alley is the oldest continuous residential street in the country, with the oldest standing house dating to 1728: (Elfreth's Alley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia).

Here's my pic:



Central Philly developed between two rivers, wtih development moving from east (the Delaware River) to the west (the Schuylkill River). Elfreth's Alley is located in Old City. Today, Old City houses many boutiques and galleries in the ground floors of most of the older buildings with the upper floors serving as loft residences.

Further south from Old City but still along the Delaware River is Society Hill, which claims to be "the largest concentration of original 18th- and early 19th-century residential architecture of any place in the United States."
(Society Hill, Philadelphia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). If it's not true, I don't know where else one might find such a collection. Here are a few pix of Society Hill:











As you move west of Broad Street towards the Schuylkill River, you reach Rittenhouse Square. This neighborhood is also quite posh, but the housing stock there is more late 19th Century/early 20th Century. That's where you'll find the greatest concentration of brownstones in the city as well as some of the grandest town homes:


(all pix mine)
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Old 08-27-2014, 02:30 PM
 
56,741 posts, read 81,061,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
These areas are still in demand and I'd say most are in the 125-500,000 dollar range, with some as low as 80,000 and maybe as high as 900,000 tops.

Greater Strathmore Neighborhood Association
http://goo.gl/maps/CINb0

SEDGWICK FARM NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION
http://goo.gl/maps/IAB6z

Berkeley Park
http://goo.gl/maps/bGzYv

http://www.wenanation.org/Westcott%2...0Scottholm.pdf
http://goo.gl/maps/9ttbF

There are other areas that have a similar look, but aren't necessarily in defined districts. You can find similar neighborhoods in suburban villages or in older suburban areas as well. Here's an example: https://m.facebook.com/DeWittshireNY...le.com%2F&_rdr
http://goo.gl/maps/GQvr2

This is another district that is somewhat gentrified by some in the local LGBT community: Welcome to the District of Hawley-Green!
Hawley-Green Historic District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://goo.gl/maps/3vIvS
A couple more that have apartments and are within Downtown, which has around a 99% occupancy rate.

Hanover Square, Syracuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://www.syracuse.ny.us/parks/hanoverSquare.html
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=hanov...,96.62,,0,2.08

Armory Square :: Official Website for Historic Downtown Syracuse, NY
Armory Square - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=armor...156.53,,0,3.81
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Old 08-27-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,100 posts, read 1,076,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
In the Midwest and NE, I know there are lots of old/historic neighborhoods found in the biggest cities to the smallest towns. In the sunbelt, and out west, I know that some of the older cities have a few old/historic neighborhoods, but they are less common, because these cities grew mostly after WWII. (with some obvious exceptions, like New Orleans, San Francisco, Charleston, SC, etc..)

So, I'm starting this thread for those who would like to share photo tours, Google street views, websites, etc. that highlight the old and interesting neighborhoods in their city. But, I'm also interested in how accessible these neighborhoods are to the average person. Are these neighborhoods gentrified and extremely expensive, relative to newer neighborhoods? Are these neighborhoods so popular that they are in danger of being demolished and replaced with new apartment buildings? Or, maybe they're so UNpopular that they are decaying into the ground?
I know what you're saying about post WW II development, but to be fair- most cities in the south and west have significant historic districts, as well- unless they weren't incorporated until much later, which usually means that they're modern-day suburbs. When you drive through any small town in the south, you're likely to see where the wealthier people built nicer homes. Seriously, I'm not a fan of the modern day layout of southern towns, but I can't think of one that doesn't have a small historic district near the original downtown. The bigger cities are usually sprawl-y these days, but even most of them (Charlotte, Tampa, etc., etc.) had significant streetcar lines that ran through neighborhoods.

The west is a little different. The built history isn't as old as the NE, but still impressive. For example, most intermountain west cities have old neighborhoods that are filled with grand victorians, gothic revivals, early 20th century craftsman homes, and even castles built by industry barons. My old neighborhood in Capitol Hill Denver was filled with them. Some have been converted to multi-unit housing, museums, and restaurants, others house organizations or have been razed for more housing. Many of the older neighborhoods have great examples of this type of architecture- Congress Park, North Capitol Hill, Washington Park, Platt Park, 5 points, Highlands, and late 19th early century neighborhoods like Bonnie Brae and Cherry Creek. Here's a few street shots:

https://www.google.com/search?q=hick...homes&tbm=isch

https://www.google.com/maps/place/De...8ef4f8278a36d6

Now I live in the mountains, and many mountain towns stayed small due to remote location and inaccessibility. They range from Victorians to much more modest old housing. I'd love to say that they're affordable, but with such limited housing inventory available, they're much more expensive than people in other places would expect. Here's a quick glimpse down the typical street near downtown here in Glenwood Springs.

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.5454...kMCVCUCi9A!2e0

A few blocks to the north is Doc Holliday's gravesite, and the other direction is the turn of the century AMTRAK station:
http://pics4.city-data.com/cpicc/cfiles50440.jpg which was built to match the hot springs and Hotel Colorado, where Teddy Roosevelt relocated the White House staff to when he went on bear hunts in the area: http://staciechaiken.files.wordpress...colorado-2.jpg

Perhaps one of the best examples of the is Helena, MT. My wife and I visited relatives last year and took a tour of the "Mansion District" - an amazing area that was home to mining, railroad, and construction tycoons in the 1800's. Helena was once home to more millionaires per capita than anywhere else in the country and supposedly the largest concentration of millionaires in the world! The neighborhood is amazing. Here are some shots of the houses in the neighborhood: https://www.google.com/search?q=hele...trict&tbm=isch

Anyway, cool thread, I just wanted to throw $.02 in. It's not really that the older cities of the south and the west don't have many historical neighborhoods, just that there were fewer towns, spread much further apart. The towns that do exist almost always have a historical district. And many of them, especially in the south, didn't hit a boom until much, much later. In the case of the west, the older neighborhoods tend to reflect the huge boom and bust cycles unique to the area, and many municipalities didn't make it, as evidenced by the many ghost towns in the area!
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Old 08-27-2014, 05:17 PM
 
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Even though Orlando is considered to be a new Sunbelt city, Orlando does actually have some historic spots within city-limits and a few in the surrounding areas.

Orlando's Church Street Station:






Church Street:











Lake Adair Historic District:



Lake Cherokee Historic District:


Lake Eola Heights Historic District:




Lake Ivanhoe Historic District:



And west of Orlando, there is a town called Winter Garden with a nice historic Downtown:









All these were taken on Street View btw (with the exception of the black and whites of course).
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,666,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
I know what you're saying about post WW II development, but to be fair- most cities in the south and west have significant historic districts, as well- unless they weren't incorporated until much later, which usually means that they're modern-day suburbs.

Oh, absolutely! But the post after yours, by LordHomunculus, is a good example of what I was hoping to see in this thread; I doubt many people would associate Orlando with historic districts.
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