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View Poll Results: Where should we move?
Minneapolis, MN 17 43.59%
Boston, MA 3 7.69%
Tacoma, WA 9 23.08%
Madison, WI 10 25.64%
Voters: 39. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-02-2014, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,402,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, bite me!
Typical response from you when you're called on your BS - just about anyone else would admit they were wrong, but your ego is too giant for you to make that particular move.

I used to go skating every day in front of my grandparents' house, unless it was too warm and the ice got slushy. Now I'm more likely to go hiking or skiing than skating, but I still get outside as often as possible.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,191,754 times
Reputation: 6239
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogead View Post
Yup!,

We just lie about going out in the winter. The entire city shuts down between November 1st and April 1st. We actually project ultra high-tech holograms throughout the city, which gives the illusion of human activity. Damn--Katiana has exposed our secret!
It is September 2nd and there is already 3ft of snow on the ground. The temperature hasn't risen above zero since mid-July. Ice box I tells ya.

I'm not ready for November 1st as I haven't updated my hologram from WindowsXP.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,766,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
One of my daughters went to college south of there (Mpls, not St. Louis) and the school schedule was set up so the majority of the students (and teachers) did not have to be on campus in January.
Uhhh that's definitely not why they set up the school calendar that way. J-Terms and long winter breaks are common all over the place, that has nothing to do with weather. I went to college 20 minutes south of the Minnesota border and we had a J-Term too. Most people use it for internships, independent studies, and job shadowing, not to escape the weather. And never in my four years was class cancelled because of the weather. Same thing growing up in Minnesota - we had one snow day the entire time I went to school there.

There are a lot of people here who are very very familiar with daily life in Minneapolis; why not let them be the ones to give advice about it?

3.5 million people live in the Twin Cities. Another 1.5 million in Milwaukee. 9.5 million in Chicago. 8 million in Toronto and the rest of the Golden Horseshoe. Nearly 4 million in Montreal. 1 million each in Ottawa, Edmonton, and Calgary, and closing in on 1 million in Winnipeg and Quebec City. That's almost 30 million in those major cities alone. People would not live in cold-climate cities if they weren't habitable.
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Old 09-02-2014, 04:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Minneapolis is colder than Moscow in the winter and hotter than it during the summer. Milwaukee and Chicago are significantly warmer.

From the weatherspark link:

Milwaukee:
"Over the course of a year, the temperature typically varies from 15F to 80F and is rarely below -2F or above 90F. . . . The cold season lasts from November 29 to March 6 with an average daily high temperature below 38F. The coldest day of the year is January 17, with an average low of 15F and high of 28F."

Chicago:
Over the course of a year, the temperature typically varies from 17F to 84F and is rarely below -0F or above 93F. . . .The cold season lasts from November 29 to March 3 with an average daily high temperature below 41F. The coldest day of the year is January 17, with an average low of 17F and high of 30F.

Toronto:
Over the course of a year, the temperature typically varies from 20F to 77F and is rarely below 5F or above 84F. . . The cold season lasts from December 2 to March 18 with an average daily high temperature below 39F. The coldest day of the year is January 18, with an average low of 20F and high of 30F.

The other Canadian cities you mentioned are colder, but all have less population.

List of census metropolitan areas and agglomerations in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Calgary actually has a climate more like Denver's:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calgary#Climate
"Calgary has the warmest winters of all the major prairie cities, based on the average nighttime temperatures from December to February.[40] The climate is greatly influenced by the city's elevation and proximity to the Rocky Mountains. Calgary's winters are broken up by warm, dry Chinook winds that routinely blow into the city from over the mountains during the winter months. These winds are known to raise the winter temperature by 20 C (36 F), and as much as 30 C (54 F) in just a few hours, and may last several days."

Re: Calgary Olympics:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1988_Winter_Olympics
"The weather was a dominant story throughout much of the Games, as strong chinook winds that brought daily temperatures as high as 17 C (63 F) wreaked havoc on the schedules for outdoor events. Events were delayed when winds were deemed unsafe for competitors and organizers used artificial snow making equipment to ensure skiing venues were properly prepared.[52] It was the first time in Olympic history that alpine events were held on artificial snow."

Only Toronto is near the size of Minneapolis, and it's warmer in winter.
Many of these J-term schools are in the upper midwest. If you don't think the weather has something to do with it, think again.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 09-02-2014 at 04:11 PM..
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Old 09-02-2014, 04:30 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Montreal is about the same size as Minneapolis, by metropolitan population. Toronto is larger than either. Both Montreal and Minneapolis are colder in the winter than other cities mentioned. Unlike Minneapolis, where winter is much drier than most of the rest of the year, but similar to New England, winter isn't a dry season. Go to the coast, of Maine or Atlantic Canada, and winter is the wettest season but not by much. Boston is almost even. So Montreal gets a lot more snow (90") than Minneapolis even though it has about the same winter temperatures.
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Old 09-02-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Montreal is closer to the size of Detroit. Chicago and Milwaukee and Toronto are HARDLY significantly warmer than Minneapolis.

You are splitting hairs right and left. You are desperately misinformed and it's not fair to the people asking real questions.
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Old 09-02-2014, 06:45 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,732,030 times
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In all honesty, we are spending a large amount of time inside during the winter compared to the rest of the country.

In Minneapolis - St Paul ice fishing is very popular but nowhere as popular as fishing in the summer of course.
we do also have 2 ski/snowboard resorts that are pretty popular for people around here.
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
173 posts, read 197,586 times
Reputation: 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
However, it's one thing to be out in the cold recreationally. You warm up moving around fast, you're dressed for it. If you're just going from building to building for an errand or work, you don't really want to be bothered.

When I was still living in Birmingham, AL last year our new company VP who had just moved from Minneapolis insisted that she actually found Birmingham winters WORSE than Minneapolis, as crazy as that sounds. She said because of the skywalks/heated garages it was more tolerable than in Birmingham, where we routinely have to walk the side walks, rarely have home garages, and definitely don't have heated walkways.
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Old 09-03-2014, 01:32 PM
 
Location: District of Columbia
737 posts, read 1,413,456 times
Reputation: 466
I'm from the South originally and winters there are not as magical as many from the Midwest, and Northeast seem to believe. With the exception of maybe central and southern Florida but they even get cold snaps. During the winter it is quite common to see a variety of snow, ice, freezing rain, & sleet scattered throughout much of the region and particularly the mid-south (KY, TN, VA, NC, WV). Given that it tends to quite humid year round when temps get low enough ice can form on roads and power lines which becomes a crippling issue (think Atlanta, Birmingham, and Charlotte this past winter). Growing up in the south I saw few if any outdoor activity in winter, 40 degrees seemed to be the common cut off point regarding outdoor activity. People simply wouldn't go out if it was 40 degrees or colder, aside from maybe hunters? Upper Midwest winters are very charming especially If you are a snow lover! It's not all doom and gloom from Nov to March.
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Old 11-09-2014, 07:51 PM
 
8 posts, read 14,148 times
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I just moved to Tacoma from St. Paul - literally a hop across the river from Mpls. The main reason I left was because I couldn't deal with the extreme winters. It sounds like you're mentally prepared to do that, and from the criteria you posted, I think Minneapolis would be far and away the best option for you. I miss it a lot - especially the dining options and the bike-friendliness. And I think to compensate for the weather, there are festivals ALL THE TIME. Plus the music scene there is one of the best in the country. Good luck in your decision-making!
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