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View Poll Results: Southernmost northeastern state
New Jersey 29 23.58%
Pennsylvania 14 11.38%
Delaware 7 5.69%
Maryland 45 36.59%
West Virginia 11 8.94%
Virginia 17 13.82%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-09-2014, 02:22 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 776,929 times
Reputation: 353

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So, in other words, people in Maryland sound like they could be from anywhere (because the people you meet there could literally be from anywhere)?
Pretty much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
MD is a northern state. The people you met in Southern Maryland has Mid-Atlantic accents that are similar to the rest of Maryland, Delaware and Southern New Jersey.
Most of Maryland does not have a Mid-Atlantic dialect... Southern Maryland least of all.

Last edited by Tezcatlipoca; 09-09-2014 at 03:27 PM..
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:28 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Towson averages 25.6 inches of snow annually.
Maryland averages 20 inches as a state

By contrast, NJ averages 23 inches as a state.

Also: Baltimore accent - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That seems weird. A website I looked at said it was 9. BestPlaces.
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
South Jersey has a more Philly inspired accent - maybe DE, too but I doubt MD. They may be similar but they're not the same.

"Wooder" for water, for example, is a Philly/South Jersey thing. I wonder if people in MD would pronounce it the same.
Listen to this guy speak. He's from Southern Maryland, possesses an unmistakable southern accent, but yet says "wooder."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssYf2jT_ARw

At the 0:40 mark he says, "My family has always told me not to work on the wooder." You can pronounce certain words the same as they do somewhere else, but still sound completely different.
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
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All of the white people at the DC Wharf sound like this. They come in everyday from Southern Maryland. This is the closest thing you will ever see to a working-class white person in the District of Columbia.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsR9LStAZRU
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,263,797 times
Reputation: 2168
Wooder is the trademark Maryland accent, it is incredible that anyone making so many claims about MD wouldn`t know that . ^ And those guys in the videos sound just like country white folks from parts of PA, South Jersey, and Delaware, and MD. Note: country white folks, not blacks in Dover or Italians in South Philly.


http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CrnE7PSJZaI

Classic MD, DE, South Jersey and PA accent.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Wooder is the trademark Maryland accent, it is incredible that anyone making so many claims about MD wouldn`t know that .
There is no "Maryland" accent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
^ And those guys in the videos sound just like country white folks from parts of PA, South Jersey, and Delaware, and MD. Note: country white folks, not blacks in Dover or Italians in South Philly.
No, they don't.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:37 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 776,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I'd like to get a better understanding of the accents of MD's Eastern Shore. I've met a group of women, and none of them had southern accents, yet all were born and raised in the Salisbury, MD area. I've met people who grew up in Ocean City, Maryland with no discernible southern accent. However, my question is, since MD is a southern state, wouldn't any accent in any region of Maryland be considered southern?
The Midland dialect (commonly described as "no accent") is fairly common statewide, and that's probably what you heard. Here in Southern Maryland many people speak a Tidewater dialect normally but switch to a Midland/Standard when around educated people or strangers, usually unconsciously. This could be the case with the women you spoke to. However, there's also a decent chance that Midland was their native dialect.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
The Midland dialect (commonly described as "no accent") is fairly common statewide, and that's probably what you heard. Here in Southern Maryland many people speak a Tidewater dialect normally but switch to a Midland/Standard when around educated people or strangers, usually unconsciously. This could be the case with the women you spoke to. However, there's also a decent chance that Midland was their native dialect.
Did you listen to the two videos I posted?

I remember way back when, maybe around 93 or 94, we would run into a lot of people who sounded a bit similar to the kid in the first video. We'd hear that accent in Indian Head, La Plata, Brandywine, Waldorf, Huntingtown, Prince Frederick, etc. Those people, I guess, have retreated deeper into Southern Maryland and/or have been replaced by transplants. It's a bit rare to hear it nowadays, but if you come across some Whites in deep Upper Marlboro, or Accokeek, you still hear a bit of it.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,263,797 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
You didn't even ackowledge his point about Tidewater and Southern Appalachian influences on the Baltimore accent. It's as if the hundreds of thousands of White Southerners who migrated to Baltimore never happened. That's why the same linguists you note say that the Baltimore accent "has a distinct southern character."
If Lablov wanted to place Baltimore in the Southern zone, he would`ve done so. Instead it is in unique zone shared by Philly, DE, and South Jersey, and further insulated by the midland dialect before it becomes Southern.

When you get a job you can travel down to VA and NC and see what Southern is. Loads of people do it in the region, and perhaps this is why most people - like the poll indicates - consider MD/DE the northeast and not the South. You can expand your post count from 15,000 to 20,000 and it still won`t change the reality.
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:57 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 776,929 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Did you listen to the two videos I posted?

I remember way back when, maybe around 93 or 94, we would run into a lot of people who sounded a bit similar to the kid in the first video. We'd hear that accent in Indian Head, La Plata, Brandywine, Waldorf, Huntingtown, Prince Frederick, etc. Those people, I guess, have retreated deeper into Southern Maryland and/or have been replaced by transplants. It's a bit rare to hear it nowadays, but if you come across some Whites in deep Upper Marlboro, or Accokeek, you still hear a bit of it.
Yes, I did.
In fact, I was just in Huntingtown about an hour or so ago and heard accents just like those. Just got to speak to locals in the local accent... I bet if i'd spoken in the voice i'd've used around my college professors or in a job interview they'd have tidied their speech up and adopted a more neutral accent.
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