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View Poll Results: Southernmost northeastern state
New Jersey 29 23.58%
Pennsylvania 14 11.38%
Delaware 7 5.69%
Maryland 45 36.59%
West Virginia 11 8.94%
Virginia 17 13.82%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-22-2014, 01:47 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,848,897 times
Reputation: 2585

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
ok, according to you it is, because you're from farther south. Maryland is not a southeastern state anymore, even tho it used to be a long time ago before the civil war.
Isn't this some funny crap.

The guy from far South (if he really is but judging by his stereotypical assumptions of what the South is he really isn't Southern or he is from such a rural part of the South that it's all he knows) considers MD the North. I, the Northerner considers it the South.

The US Census, Geography, and History consider it the South. To certain Northerners, MD is the South. To certain Southerners, MD is the North. MD people can't seem to agree. Hey, it's just like Texas. It's off-South.
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:50 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,848,897 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Just saying the guy who is from the south and has lived 20+ yrs in MD and the northeast has a better idea of what he is talking about.

Youve never even lived in MD and in the Baltimore forum you ask all kinds of noob questions about MD that anyone knows something about MD would know. Lol.
Ok, and then you have native Marylanders who moved to the Northeast who say it IS the South. What's your point? Your anecdote is better than my anecdote? Go back and read the thread. I'm not the only non-Marylander saying it's the South nor are Marylanders the only ones saying it's the North.

Besides, it's the internet. Anybody can claim they lived somewhere and did anything. I guess you didn't see other people reply and tell him he doesn't know what he is talking about. Now, do you have anything to contribute to the actual discussion or do you know only how to be a cheerleader?
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Give this man a medal.

Balmer's proximity to Philly doesn't make Balmer Northern. Philly in fact is closer to Balmer than it is to NYC and Boston.

Here is a GREAT explanation of the Philly accent:

The Overlooked Philadelphia Accent | Dialect Blog

Yes, the Philly accent does share pronunciation with Southern accents. I got this from hearing Beanie Sigel talk to Jay-Z, hearing Beanie's lingering Northeastern pronunciation but with some Southern infused in. Jay-Z on the other hand is 100% Northeastern in his way of talking.

The fact that Balmer's accent is more Southern than Philly's leaves Philly to be kind of a halfway, and Balmer to be the full-on Southern accent of the two Mid-Atlantic variations. If someone thinks Philly is 100% Northeastern, from whence comes "wooder"? People in NYC pronounce it "wawtah".
Correct. Both cities could be accurately described as sleepy southern towns until the 1980s. That's when New Yorkers arrived in Philly and Baltimore in droves and effectively made the culture in those cities "Northeastern."

Quote:
The glimmering glass pavilions, pyramid-shaped aquarium and spiffy red-brick downtown baseball park that today lure tourists by the millions to Baltimore's Inner Harbor were little more than blueprints on a developer's drawing board when, in 1970, I first left the sleepy Southern town of my birth.
WEEKEND EXCURSION - How Dowdy Old Baltimore Turned Fashionable - NYTimes.com

The same description would have applied to Philadelphia since Baltimore and Philly are essentially the same city.
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Ok, and then you have native Marylanders who moved to the Northeast who say it IS the South. What's your point? Your anecdote is better than my anecdote? Go back and read the thread. I'm not the only non-Marylander saying it's the South nor are Marylanders the only ones saying it's the North.
Nathaniel Branson moved to Baltimore and thought it was the South.

Quote:
Baltimore is a southern city. When I came here Baltimore was as southern, if not more so, as my hometown of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
Nathaniel Branson - Social Work - UMBC

Branson would have said the same thing about Philadelphia had he moved there. Though Philly is unrecognizable today as much of its southerness has been diluted by northern transplants.


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Old 09-22-2014, 02:30 PM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,487,723 times
Reputation: 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Isn't this some funny crap.

The guy from far South (if he really is but judging by his stereotypical assumptions of what the South is he really isn't Southern or he is from such a rural part of the South that it's all he knows) considers MD the North. I, the Northerner considers it the South.

The US Census, Geography, and History consider it the South. To certain Northerners, MD is the South. To certain Southerners, MD is the North. MD people can't seem to agree. Hey, it's just like Texas. It's off-South.
I agree but it seems like he couldn't be move. He even said fried chicken made by blacks in Maryland doesn't even taste right lol. I had to move on after that.
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Old 09-22-2014, 03:39 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,848,897 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
I agree but it seems like he couldn't be move. He even said fried chicken made by blacks in Maryland doesn't even taste right lol. I had to move on after that.
Did you mean he couldn't be moved?

Hey, I am no judge on fried chicken, as I think it's overrated. But all this anecdotal evidence is irrelevant if you ask me. Posting Maryland accents, posting history, discussing geography, THAT is what matters.

In my opinion when I went to Western Maryland it felt like the Midwest. People's accents were General American and nobody sounded like New Yorkers or Virginians. The only "Southern" thing I FELT was the County Fair at Montgomery. But it's so subjective. I didn't eat anything that felt particularly Southern or Northeastern. When I visited my then girlfriend's family they seemed like a normal Middle American family from any of the Midwestern states. Nobody had a twang and it really could have been anywhere in the country.

Guess what? When I went to New York many locals didn't seem all that different from people in Chicago. The NY accent might as well be dead in certain parts. I have some family in NY that retain the accent, but if you go to places in Manhattan it's hard to find it. I'm not saying NY doesn't feel like NY, but subjectively judging what a place feels like is not a good indicator of anything. I have been to other parts of the South that felt more Southern than Maryland, and yet I've been to certain parts of Illinois that felt more Southern than certain parts of the South. I've even heard some Southerners say that Chicago has a Southern feel to it where some Southerners feel it's nothing like the South. Does this change geography?
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Old 09-22-2014, 07:26 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 777,076 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Just saying the guy who is from the south and has lived 20+ yrs in MD and the northeast has a better idea of what he is talking about.
Judging by that guy's post, he's either never been to MD, lives in MD and has never left his own house, or lives in some secluded enclave of pure Northerners. That post was absolutely ridiculous.
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Old 09-22-2014, 08:40 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,986 posts, read 27,281,008 times
Reputation: 9009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Judging by that guy's post, he's either never been to MD, lives in MD and has never left his own house, or lives in some secluded enclave of pure Northerners. That post was absolutely ridiculous.
I'm voting for not leaving his own house. no fried chicken ROFLMAO What you get in Maryland, in spades, is chicken & crabs.
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:41 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,597,007 times
Reputation: 1073
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Give this man a medal.

Balmer's proximity to Philly doesn't make Balmer Northern. Philly in fact is closer to Balmer than it is to NYC and Boston.

Here is a GREAT explanation of the Philly accent:

The Overlooked Philadelphia Accent | Dialect Blog

Yes, the Philly accent does share pronunciation with Southern accents. I got this from hearing Beanie Sigel talk to Jay-Z, hearing Beanie's lingering Northeastern pronunciation but with some Southern infused in. Jay-Z on the other hand is 100% Northeastern in his way of talking.

The fact that Balmer's accent is more Southern than Philly's leaves Philly to be kind of a halfway, and Balmer to be the full-on Southern accent of the two Mid-Atlantic variations. If someone thinks Philly is 100% Northeastern, from whence comes "wooder"? People in NYC pronounce it "wawtah".
Do you have a example of a southerner saying "wooder"? No because "wooder" is unique and not a southern pronunciation. The southern accent pronunciation of water is the same way they pronunciate lawyer (so it is pronounced as waw-ter and law-yer to southerners) while the northern pronunciation of lawyer is "loyer" (which is similar transformation of water to wooder). Philadelphia's accent is overwhelmingly northeastern with slight similarities to the Midland dialect and in contrast the Baltimore accent has Southern and Midland similarities to go with the lesser extent northern influence. So that makes Baltimore more of a grey area accent because of its southerness. In all, the Philadelphia and Baltimore accents have unique Midland similarities but at the same time the Philadelphia and Baltimore accents are very different for the reasons I said before.
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:12 AM
 
774 posts, read 1,697,022 times
Reputation: 681
Philly a Southern city? Never was, never will be. No wait, since most people can't agree on what is in the South and many want to be Southerners, I have decided that the South now extends all the way to the Canadian border, so the southernmost Northeastern state is now what ever the southernmost province in Canada is.
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