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Old 09-15-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: The South
380 posts, read 476,515 times
Reputation: 476

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I challenge you to try Ghost Pepper wings. Find a place the offers them. I may be a local place. BWW offered them this summer. This local place, Bayou Wings, offered some. The real hot stuff has a delay. It takes about 5 seconds for the heat to knock your socks off.
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Old 09-15-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,500,006 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by tewest86 View Post
I challenge you to try Ghost Pepper wings. Find a place the offers them. I may be a local place. BWW offered them this summer. This local place, Bayou Wings, offered some. The real hot stuff has a delay. It takes about 5 seconds for the heat to knock your socks off.
My stomach is becoming less and less tolerant unfortunately :-(

I really really love spicy stuff... but bad things are happening lately whenever I go into the extra-hot category that didn't used to happen. I still get my Thai food Extra Thai Hot, and I still get my Atomic wings, but I can't go too hot or there will be bathroom punishment.
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Old 09-15-2014, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC metro
3,518 posts, read 4,400,446 times
Reputation: 1386
I'd be willing to try the ghost pepper wings. But it's better for enjoying the m at home. I know it's not the "true" challenge but I like to enjoy the flavor and if I'm going to get dizzy, let it be at home!
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,950,133 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
most of of chesapeake is salt water

havre-de-grace is right where the susquehanna flows into the bay
Since the Chesapeake experiences significant tidal changes, that means it's at least very brackish and thus very fertile for all kinds of "seafood." Tidal estuaries are vitally important to the health and nurturing of most of the best kinds of seafood -- clams, crabs, oysters, shrimp, etc.

Do the Great Lakes even have tides? My sources tell me no. Therefore, the Great Lakes are NOT "seas" or "oceans" and therefore, are incapable of producing "seafood."

Thus far in this thread, there's been one person who's insisted that fish caught out of the Great Lakes is "seafood." The consensus states otherwise.
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,911,740 times
Reputation: 4778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
I learned from reading the obits that Chick-fil-A is now officially the No. 1 chicken restaurant in the nation in sales.
Americans like fast food and fattening food not a surprise. Chick A Fila is pretty good thou, once in a blue moon. I love their chicken fingers with Chick Fila sauce its awesome!!!
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC metro
3,518 posts, read 4,400,446 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Since the Chesapeake experiences significant tidal changes, that means it's at least very brackish and thus very fertile for all kinds of "seafood." Tidal estuaries are vitally important to the health and nurturing of most of the best kinds of seafood -- clams, crabs, oysters, shrimp, etc.

Do the Great Lakes even have tides? My sources tell me no. Therefore, the Great Lakes are NOT "seas" or "oceans" and therefore, are incapable of producing "seafood."

Thus far in this thread, there's been one person who's insisted that fish caught out of the Great Lakes is "seafood." The consensus states otherwise.
No tides, but the St. Lawrence at the mouth does, not that it's relevant. The water rarely gets above 65.
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Old 09-16-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Since the Chesapeake experiences significant tidal changes, that means it's at least very brackish and thus very fertile for all kinds of "seafood." Tidal estuaries are vitally important to the health and nurturing of most of the best kinds of seafood -- clams, crabs, oysters, shrimp, etc.

Do the Great Lakes even have tides? My sources tell me no. Therefore, the Great Lakes are NOT "seas" or "oceans" and therefore, are incapable of producing "seafood."

Thus far in this thread, there's been one person who's insisted that fish caught out of the Great Lakes is "seafood." The consensus states otherwise.
Who cares? There is a DEFINITION that is an academic consensus - most words have more than one definition. I linked several times to this definition. How about you address this fact instead of ignoring it? In the case of "seafood," one definition states that it's any non-mammalian food from the ocean; another states that it can be fresh or saltwater. Where I live, people often call freshwater food "seafood." Just because you don't and just because a few lame folks on this forum who live by the coast and want to "win" an argument pretend it doesn't exist simply doesn't matter in the real world. Seafood can be fresh or salt water according to the Webster dictionary, which is definitely a more esteemed source than "frequent poster and southern wonk Newsboy of the City-Data forums."
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Old 09-16-2014, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,500,006 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Who cares? There is a DEFINITION that is an academic consensus - most words have more than one definition. I linked several times to this definition. How about you address this fact instead of ignoring it? In the case of "seafood," one definition states that it's any non-mammalian food from the ocean; another states that it can be fresh or saltwater. Where I live, people often call freshwater food "seafood." Just because you don't and just because a few lame folks on this forum who live by the coast and want to "win" an argument pretend it doesn't exist simply doesn't matter in the real world. Seafood can be fresh or salt water according to the Webster dictionary, which is definitely a more esteemed source than "frequent poster and southern wonk Newsboy of the City-Data forums."
Someone's ignoring Webster's contradictions to itself. I think it's more reasonable to say that seafood is... idk FOOD FROM THE SEA.

And just what is the sea?

Sea: the salt water that covers much of the Earth's surface ( literary )


It can't get much more literal than this. Sea+food = Food from Sea... Sea = The OCEAN


Just because some people out there refer to freshwater food as "seafood" doesn't mean that it is literally seafood, because well... it's not.
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Old 09-16-2014, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
Someone's ignoring Webster's contradictions to itself. I think it's more reasonable to say that seafood is... idk FOOD FROM THE SEA.

And just what is the sea?

Sea: the salt water that covers much of the Earth's surface ( literary )


It can't get much more literal than this. Sea+food = Food from Sea... Sea = The OCEAN


Just because some people out there refer to freshwater food as "seafood" doesn't mean that it is literally seafood, because well... it's not.
"NEWSFLASH: City-Data poster wolf39us claims Webster dictionary definition for seafood is FALSE, details at 10:00..."
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Old 09-16-2014, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,500,006 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
"NEWSFLASH: City-Data poster wolf39us claims Webster dictionary definition for seafood is FALSE, details at 10:00..."
You're ignoring Webster's contradiction to itself.

Here's dictionary.com

Seafood | Define Seafood at Dictionary.com

Quote:
noun
1.
any fish or shellfish from the sea used for food.

noun
1.
edible saltwater fish or shellfish

n.
"food obtained from the sea," 1836, American English, from sea + food.


PS: The dictionary definition FROM Webster dictionary says
Quote:
edible marine fish and shellfish

The second entry you see is from a separate source (Britannica) which is sourced on the very same page if you read it. Britannica is notorious for constant errors, I'll go with the DICTIONARY definition.
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