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Old 08-28-2014, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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You do realize the Mason Dixon Line was charted in colonial times and is a very outdated way to distinguish north from south? In my experience, culture doesn't change so dramatically from stepping over a distinct line. That said, I do agree the southern halves of Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and into Kansas felt very southern to me when driving through them on I-70 from PA to CO. There were some very religious billboards and at one point the biggest cross I've ever seen. It was very strange, and a little unexpected as I didn't realize the "Bible Belt" reached that far north. However, if we had to redraw the Mason Dixon Line, it would follow something along the line of the "Bible Belt": Bible Belt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
If by southern transplants you mean people from Virginia and Kentucky who settled these areas in the late 18th and early 19th century than you're right.

Something tells me that's not what you mean though.
It isn't!
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:59 PM
 
342 posts, read 395,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
OMG we are gonna start the Maryland debate again lol. 4th thread 2 days.
LOL Well it's true. And the MAson Dixon line was drawn during the colonial days (before a USA existed) to settle disputes between the colonies of MD and PA. It isnt a border between north/south like many say, and even if it was it would be a terrible border.
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Old 08-28-2014, 02:22 PM
 
320 posts, read 473,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
If by southern transplants you mean people from Virginia and Kentucky who settled these areas in the late 18th and early 19th century than you're right.

Something tells me that's not what you mean though.
Any southerners from then until now. Y'all act like southerners can't/ won't move up north.
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Old 08-28-2014, 02:58 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
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Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
Any southerners from then until now. Y'all act like southerners can't/ won't move up north.
Yeah they can. Except that Chicago has many Southern transplants and still doesn't feel like the South. Unlike Southern Illinois that does.

Maybe these Southern transplants all want to stay south of the line.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
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Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yeah they can. Except that Chicago has many Southern transplants and still doesn't feel like the South. Unlike Southern Illinois that does.
No kidding! I'm not sure why continues on and on and on with this "line," as it doesn't matter ultimately and is simply untrue ta boot.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I have been wondering that if the Mason-Dixon line (AKA Pennsylvania's Southern border) didn't stop at Pennsylvania and continued west, cutting through Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, that the Southern part of these states would "make more sense" as being rather "Southern" instead of Midwestern.

I am from Chicago. When I drive to Southern Illinois, it feels like the South. People like to say that such people don't have true Southern accents, but rural accents. I think the theory of rural people sounding Southern is such bull. Meet a rural Michigander, Wisconsinite, or Minnesotan and they do NOT sound Southern. People in the country don't possess Southern accents unless they are in the South. And the exception to this is southern parts of many Midwestern states that come south of the Mason-Dixon. But again, I think that if you stretch the Mason Dixon line into Missouri and further, the southern parts of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and 90% of Missouri would actually be in the South. But because the Mason-Dixon line ends in the Southwestern tip of Pennsylvania, these areas are considered the Midwest until you hear people speak.

It could have to do with the climate transition seen near the Mason-Dixon latitude, where humid continental transitions to humid subtropical. And I hear Southerners joke about their slow paced life being affected by their very uncomfortable heat indexes. The fact that practically all areas south of Pennsylvania lie in humid subtropical (or at least transition) may say something about the fact that linguistically, the way of speaking transitions, too.

Many Southern Illinoisans joke that they are really Kentucky people, as do Cincinnati natives. I think that the fact that these areas are technically south of the Mason-Dixon line gives them that Southern feel in terms of accent, culture, and even ethnic groups (larger concentration of Scotch-Irish instead of the traditionally common German ethnicity seen in most of the Midwest). Us Upper Midwesterner people share more in common with German and Scandinavian ways of speaking rather than the English and Scotch-Irish influences seen in the Southern way of speaking.
I'm just going to throw out there that the majority of Southern Illinois' population lives in the St. Louis metro. St. Louis is an island when it comes to accents, is distinctly Midwestern, and there's a ton of Germans in the area.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:04 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILikeMike91 View Post
LOL Well it's true. And the MAson Dixon line was drawn during the colonial days (before a USA existed) to settle disputes between the colonies of MD and PA. It isnt a border between north/south like many say, and even if it was it would be a terrible border.
Well, if you hear people from "Balmer" talk, yeah I would say it's a hell of a lot more Southern than Jersey, which isn't too far away. Even in Philly the accent starts getting more Southern. The fact that people jokingly refer to it as "Merland" says a lot.

However, like all transition states, Maryland's reputation is always questioned by everyone. Same thing with all other border states.

Anyway, the Maryland tourism site sure seems to think they are Southern:

Eastern Shore

"Maryland [or Merland] has its roots in Southern hospitality"

Anyway, if the line is such a bad divider between North and South, it sure seems a coincidence that people who live South of it tend to sound more Southern than those who don't. Maryland also has many non-Southern transplants in its big cities, giving it a less Southern feel. Many Southern cities are like this; losing their Southern feel due to transplants.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:07 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
I'm just going to throw out there that the majority of Southern Illinois' population lives in the St. Louis metro. St. Louis is an island when it comes to accents, is distinctly Midwestern, and there's a ton of Germans in the area.
This is true. I have yet to meet a St. Louis person that sounded Southern. But as you said, it IS an island. Not that someone being German prevents them from having a Southern accent. Tennessee has German ancestry, and they are unmistakeably Southern. I was more referring to the roots of the linguistics, not someone's ethnicity.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:10 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
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Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
No kidding! I'm not sure why continues on and on and on with this "line," as it doesn't matter ultimately and is simply untrue ta boot.
Just an interesting thing to point out. Not that it matters much, but it sure does seem more than coincidental that linguistics of Southern parts of a few Midwestern states have Southern feels to them and are South of Mason-Dixon. Even if the line is old, who cares. Someone made these definitions up sometime, and I think changing the idea of what a region is simply because it doesn't make sense to you is pretty stupid (not saying you are personally doing this). It's like, I feel that Pittsburgh isn't very Northeastern. Does that make it not Northeastern just because it's not like New York or Boston? Of course not.
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