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Old 08-28-2014, 03:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
You do realize the Mason Dixon Line was charted in colonial times and is a very outdated way to distinguish north from south? In my experience, culture doesn't change so dramatically from stepping over a distinct line. That said, I do agree the southern halves of Indiana, Illinois, Missouri and into Kansas felt very southern to me when driving through them on I-70 from PA to CO. There were some very religious billboards and at one point the biggest cross I've ever seen. It was very strange, and a little unexpected as I didn't realize the "Bible Belt" reached that far north. However, if we had to redraw the Mason Dixon Line, it would follow something along the line of the "Bible Belt": Bible Belt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Well then, using that logic we would have to include the regions of Holland and Grand Rapids, Michigan in that designation due to the fact that you see the same Biblical minded worldview up there.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This is true. I have yet to meet a St. Louis person that sounded Southern. But as you said, it IS an island. Not that someone being German prevents them from having a Southern accent. Tennessee has German ancestry, and they are unmistakeably Southern. I was more referring to the roots of the linguistics, not someone's ethnicity.
I have heard jokes that St. Louis is a Northern city trapped in a Southern state, and they are accurate to an extent. St. Louis still has an accent, but, as you noted, it's not Southern. The accent has greatly faded, but you'll hear older people in the metro says things like "warsh" instead of "wash" and "highway farty-far" instead of "highway forty-four." People also use "soda" instead of "pop," unlike other areas of the Midwest.

In regards to the island comment though, it's true that the area is one, but it is also important to note that said island walked out with a lot of the people. For example, Southern Illinois is supposed to have around 1.2 million people, and about 700k of them live in the St. Louis metro. They're not exactly the people people think about when they bring up Southern Illinois, and I don't think they view themselves the same way as people who live around Carbondale do, for example.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: USA
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I wonder how the american accents of the british colonial people got so different.
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Old 08-28-2014, 03:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
I wonder how the american accents of the british colonial people got so different.
Different linguistic regions of the country have influences other than British. For example, a lot of Appalachian dialects have Scotch-Irish influence. The Upper Midwest is influenced by Scandinavian tongues (i.e. the sing-song accent heard in Minnesota which resembles the Swedish accent a bit). It wasn't just English that had an influence on American dialects. This is why you see different Americans having variable ways of pronunciation.

I also want to mention that the British is preserved in many Southern dialects. If you hear some Virginians (and I also feel like some Georgians), especially those of "Good Ole Boy" variety, their English is quite close to sounding British. Elsewhere, like up in New England, the pronunciation of words like "idea", "car", and "Harvard" retains a very British feel, as does the glottal stop heard in New York in words like Manha-an, ki-en, and mi-en (Manhattan, kitten, and mitten).
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Just an interesting thing to point out. Not that it matters much, but it sure does seem more than coincidental that linguistics of Southern parts of a few Midwestern states have Southern feels to them and are South of Mason-Dixon. Even if the line is old, who cares. Someone made these definitions up sometime, and I think changing the idea of what a region is simply because it doesn't make sense to you is pretty stupid (not saying you are personally doing this). It's like, I feel that Pittsburgh isn't very Northeastern. Does that make it not Northeastern just because it's not like New York or Boston? Of course not.
I was agreeing with you! The one dude you were responding is a Southern Pride wonk who always says S IL (for example) isn't in any way Southern, it's just a few families who have recently moved north of the M-D. Which is untrue - it's a transition zone where the culture is at least as Southern as it is Northern.

Also, and also unrelated to you - not sure why the St Louis metro area is being brought up? When people say "Southern Illinois," they're talking about the southernmost tip of land outside any real metro influence (think Carbondale). If you're talking a Southern influence on MO, that would be the boot.
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yeah they can. Except that Chicago has many Southern transplants and still doesn't feel like the South. Unlike Southern Illinois that does.

Maybe these Southern transplants all want to stay south of the line.
I think you and some others on here are confused about what's country and what's southern.
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Old 08-29-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,529 posts, read 17,755,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
I wonder how the american accents of the british colonial people got so different.
By not changing much. It is British accents that have changed over the years.
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Old 08-29-2014, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
By not changing much. It is British accents that have changed over the years.
Indeed. And things like the R-dropping in Boston, New York, and the coastal South is because the British influence held up longer because of the ease of Atlantic travel, meaning British dialect changes remained prestigious among the upper classes, and filtered their way down.
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Old 08-29-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I think you and some others on here are confused about what's country and what's southern.
You definitely seem to need some coaching on this!
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Old 08-29-2014, 04:16 PM
 
320 posts, read 474,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
You definitely seem to need some coaching on this!
I've been southern all my life. I lived in several southern states. My family roots stretch from small southern city to small towns. I have family that stays in the "country." I know that when I drove through southern Illinois it didn't "feel" like any of the south that I've lived. And yes I still live in the south.
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