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Old 08-29-2014, 10:42 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,847,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I think you and some others on here are confused about what's country and what's southern.
I think you are confused. I know country people from Michigan and Minnesota and they are not all Southern at all. By ANY means. "Country" isn't even a culture.

P.S. Half of Illinois IS South of Mason-Dixon.
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Old 08-29-2014, 10:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I've been southern all my life. I lived in several southern states. My family roots stretch from small southern city to small towns. I have family that stays in the "country." I know that when I drove through southern Illinois it didn't "feel" like any of the south that I've lived. And yes I still live in the south.
What is a Southern feel to you?
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Old 08-30-2014, 10:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I have been wondering that if the Mason-Dixon line (AKA Pennsylvania's Southern border) didn't stop at Pennsylvania and continued west, cutting through Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, that the Southern part of these states would "make more sense" as being rather "Southern" instead of Midwestern.
This alone tells you that the Mason-Dixon Line has nothing to do with the separation between the North and South.
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Old 08-30-2014, 10:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
This alone tells you that the Mason-Dixon Line has nothing to do with the separation between the North and South.
What, to you is the separation?
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Old 08-31-2014, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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My experience has been that, at least in Illinois, the population of southern Illinois (south of I-70 excluding the Metro East) has southern influences, but they are still pretty Midwestern. This part of the population of the state is pretty small, though. The Metro East (and basically all of StL) as well as all of central Illinois (Springfield, Peoria, Champaign, Urbana, Bloomington, Normal, Decatur etc) are all solidly Midwestern despite their proximity to the "extended" Mason-Dixon.
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Old 08-31-2014, 01:58 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
My experience has been that, at least in Illinois, the population of southern Illinois (south of I-70 excluding the Metro East) has southern influences, but they are still pretty Midwestern. This part of the population of the state is pretty small, though. The Metro East (and basically all of StL) as well as all of central Illinois (Springfield, Peoria, Champaign, Urbana, Bloomington, Normal, Decatur etc) are all solidly Midwestern despite their proximity to the "extended" Mason-Dixon.
The only native southerners in Illinois are within 30 miles of the Ohio river or so. For example Carbondale is farther north than that. Metropolis is southern though.
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Old 08-31-2014, 04:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
My experience has been that, at least in Illinois, the population of southern Illinois (south of I-70 excluding the Metro East) has southern influences, but they are still pretty Midwestern. This part of the population of the state is pretty small, though. The Metro East (and basically all of StL) as well as all of central Illinois (Springfield, Peoria, Champaign, Urbana, Bloomington, Normal, Decatur etc) are all solidly Midwestern despite their proximity to the "extended" Mason-Dixon.
I agree with most of this. I have never met anyone from the 217 that seemed Southern to me. Maybe slightly, but not like them folk down in Carbondale. I had a lady there tell me that I must be from up North because when I went to pay for gas, she told me that I "ain't put any gas in yet!"
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
What is a Southern feel to you?
I'm a black man from the south and I understand that the south will never give up its love of the antebellum plantation culture. That culture is not in southern Illinois. It's country with southern influences.
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
I'm a black man from the south and I understand that the south will never give up its love of the antebellum plantation culture. That culture is not in southern Illinois. It's country with southern influences.
Well that type of culture isn't really prevalent throughout the Appalachian South either.
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,746,799 times
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I put these maps together to show what I think reflect the north/south divide. Just click the link for the large version. The first shows the geographical center of the US, which is near Lebanon, KS, at 39 50 latitude. On that map I also put the center of US population from 1790-2010.


The second map is the well-known ancestry map from the US Census 2000.

The third map is the Telsur project from the Univ. of PA.

The fourth map is from the 2013 Gallup poll of most Protestant states.





https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5584/...3aba7875_o.jpg
Click on the image and it will expand.
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