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View Poll Results: Which region sounds most English?
New England 24 42.11%
Northeast as a whole 6 10.53%
The South 21 36.84%
Midwest 2 3.51%
Mountain/Frontier 0 0%
The West 4 7.02%
Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-31-2014, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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I fail to understand how the southern dialect has anything similar to the English dialect besides being the same language?
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Old 08-31-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
NY-like pronunciation of words like "God" as "Gawd"
I have what you would call a New York accent, tempered over the course of time, and I have never pronounced "God" any other way than "Gahd" (rhymes with "cod," "rod," "odd").
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Old 08-31-2014, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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There isn't the southern dialect; there are many southern dialects.
There isn't the English dialect; there are many English dialects.

Some of the southern dialects share traits with some of the English dialects.

A couple of southern examples:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmfjfUdaH34


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRED...otation_401507

And from up north:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfR4DLXYpCw


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VE2f-dg7qI
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Old 08-31-2014, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
I don't know... the southern dialect is about as away from "English" English as it gets. I'm going to be voting for New England on this one.
You're in fact completely wrong. The Southern dialect is the MOST similar to British standard English, due to the heavy influx of scots-Irish immigrants.

Go to rural areas of the British Isles and, linguistically speaking, there's very little variation in the accent from southern American English.

Southern American English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The educated, blue-blood, refined accent that most people associate with Great Britain is not the standard accent. It's as phony and manipulated as the refined American accents you hear in American movie and TV programs prior to the 1960s -- especially in the early years of Hollywood (1930s-40s) when EVERYBODY spoke in a very quick-tempo, proper, lilting accent that was FAR from the standard of the day.

Last edited by Newsboy; 08-31-2014 at 11:10 PM..
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Old 09-01-2014, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Texarkana, Tx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Interesting article:



There are areas of New England also heavily influenced by an East Anglian accent:


However, New York English was heavily influenced by the Dutch as well as by Europeans who flooded NY in the 19th and early 20th century.




Pennyslvania, Delaware, and New Jersey were also greatly influenced by German and Swedish immigrants:


And then we have those Americans who speak "without an accent:"


Linguistics 201: The Dialects of American English

I think this is pretty interesting stuff. I love history!
Wow, very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 09-01-2014, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Texarkana, Tx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffaloHome View Post
^^This.

And there's not just one "Southern" accent any more than there's just one "English" accent.

Accents in the Outer Banks of NC sound a lot like what you'll hear in SW England:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXs9cf2YWwg

And Tangier Island, Virginia:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIZgw09CG9E
Very interesting vid.
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Old 09-01-2014, 06:06 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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It would be interesting to see what British people think for this poll.
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Old 09-01-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
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What does a New England accent sound like? Isn't the same as New York?
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Old 09-01-2014, 11:58 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
What does a New England accent sound like? Isn't the same as New York?
I think these already posted by Iammius give the gist of it. The one about the Brahmin accent says it is dying but there is a more common, even broader accent still common to eastern New England, the blue collar counterpart to the Brahmin accent. It is well evidenced by the gardening expert, Roger Cook, on This Old House.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfR4DLXYpCw


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VE2f-dg7qI

Roger Cook

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Old 09-02-2014, 06:55 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
You're in fact completely wrong. The Southern dialect is the MOST similar to British standard English, due to the heavy influx of scots-Irish immigrants.

The educated, blue-blood, refined accent that most people associate with Great Britain is not the standard accent. It's as phony and manipulated as the refined American accents you hear in American movie and TV programs prior to the 1960s -- especially in the early years of Hollywood (1930s-40s) when EVERYBODY spoke in a very quick-tempo, proper, lilting accent that was FAR from the standard of the day.
The standard British dialect is an r-dropping dialect, however and maintains vowel distinctions (mary/Mary/merry), (caught/cot) for example that many American dialects have lost.
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