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View Poll Results: Which region sounds most English?
New England 24 42.11%
Northeast as a whole 6 10.53%
The South 21 36.84%
Midwest 2 3.51%
Mountain/Frontier 0 0%
The West 4 7.02%
Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-02-2014, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The standard British dialect is an r-dropping dialect, however and maintains vowel distinctions (mary/Mary/merry), (caught/cot) for example that many American dialects have lost.
And yet many English as well as some American accents have developed the odd feature of dropping some Rs and yet adding others - for instance, dropping the R on the end of words such as "newspaper" and adding them onto the end of such words as "cabaner" (cabana). This always strikes me as so odd!

"Hey, Louiser, can ya bring me the newspapah?"
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:55 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
And yet many English as well as some American accents have developed the odd feature of dropping some Rs and yet adding others - for instance, dropping the R on the end of words such as "newspaper" and adding them onto the end of such words as "cabaner" (cabana). This always strikes me as so odd!

"Hey, Louiser, can ya bring me the newspapah?"
That's actually a common feature in r-dropping accents. I think it's that these accents have created a new rule on where r should be at the end of a word.

Linking and intrusive R - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's actually a common feature in r-dropping accents. I think it's that these accents have created a new rule on where r should be at the end of a word.

Linking and intrusive R - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yeah, I know - and thanks for the interesting link.

I just think it's so odd! And actually, while dropping Rs doesn't bother me, those intrusive Rs really grate on my nerves!
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Old 09-02-2014, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
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Somewhat relevant - on the actual English accent spoken by Shakespeare.
Here's a much more extended talk on it. Starting around 40 minutes in the accent gets discussed in detail in the second video.

Shakespearean English sounds more similar to modern day Irish, Scottish, and West Country English accents. Still, it's roughly equidistant between the modern Received Pronunciation British accent and American dialects.
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Old 09-02-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 574,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I think these already posted by Iammius give the gist of it. The one about the Brahmin accent says it is dying but there is a more common, even broader accent still common to eastern New England, the blue collar counterpart to the Brahmin accent. It is well evidenced by the gardening expert, Roger Cook, on This Old House.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfR4DLXYpCw


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VE2f-dg7qI

Roger Cook

Very interesting, thanks
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The last video is a good example of the Boston accent. The middle one a rather extreme Maine accent. The first one isn't a typical New England accent, and even back when it existed wasn't the "normal" accent. The New England accent people refer to is really an eastern New England. It reaches about as far west as Worcester and parts of New Hampshire. Conneciticut, Vermont and Western Massachusetts don't have that accent, but a much less distinctive one with some similarities to accents further wes.t
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