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Old 09-04-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,146,115 times
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A lot of this depends on where in "the north" you live, too.

In NJ, you may have to shovel 3 or 4 times a year. Last year was a "brutal" winter, and there were maybe 6 shovelable snows. So it's not like you have to shovel every day or every week. You don't need chains or snow tires if you drive a car. You don't need snowshoes to get the mail or to kill a moose to feed your family for the winter. Most of the winter, there isn't any snow on the ground at all, just brown grass.

This past winter (again, "brutal" by all accounts) we kept a snowpack for about a month. I loved walking by the park and seeing a white blanket every day. Folks who didn't shovel when that snow was fresh had a long time to regret it.
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,775 posts, read 9,406,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post

This past winter (again, "brutal" by all accounts) we kept a snowpack for about a month. I loved walking by the park and seeing a white blanket every day. Folks who didn't shovel when that snow was fresh had a long time to regret it.
But doesn't the "snowpack" get a bit ugly after a month? I remember in Pittsburgh the snow would stick around for several months but it melts a little bit and then refreezes, with all the frozen urine from dogs and lots of salt, dirt, and grime that has been blowing around. It only stays fresh if there is a fresh coat every couple of days and that usually doesn't happen.

I kind of like snowfalls in the South instead. They are rare, but still beautiful and the next day the sun melts them. Then you don't have to look at that ugly combo dirt/snowpile that northern cities have along every single road.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:08 AM
 
12,631 posts, read 10,483,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
But doesn't the "snowpack" get a bit ugly after a month? I remember in Pittsburgh the snow would stick around for several months but it melts a little bit and then refreezes, with all the frozen urine from dogs and lots of salt, dirt, and grime that has been blowing around. It only stays fresh if there is a fresh coat every couple of days and that usually doesn't happen.

I kind of like snowfalls in the South instead. They are rare, but still beautiful and the next day the sun melts them. Then you don't have to look at that ugly combo dirt/snowpile that northern cities have along every single road.
Not if fresh snow keeps falling over it. Even an inch will cover anything old. We had one of those winters. Many significant storms, but also many insignificant ones.

Along the roads, sure it's dirty, that's unavoidable. But on your lawn, or covering any grassy area anywhere, not as much.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuseumCat View Post
I wouldn't know as I have lived south my whole life. But all you hear from southern weather lovers here is that how blessed we are to have "better" weather because we don't need to shovel snow like those up in north.

But do you really need to though shovel snow there? I would assume those who live in apartments are automatically free of that. But does it really matter is the rest does it or not? What purpose does it serve? Does anything of significance really happen if you don"t?
I think you've seen from the responses that yes, things of significance can happen if you don't shovel. eschaton talked about the legal liabilities of unshoveled walks, and bradj2009 talked about getting a citation and not getting your garbage picked up. In my city, you have 24 hours after the snow ends (I'm not sure just how they determine this but whatever) to get that walk shoveled or you will get a ticket. One time I slipped and fell on some ice on the street and got a concussion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
But doesn't the "snowpack" get a bit ugly after a month? I remember in Pittsburgh the snow would stick around for several months but it melts a little bit and then refreezes, with all the frozen urine from dogs and lots of salt, dirt, and grime that has been blowing around. It only stays fresh if there is a fresh coat every couple of days and that usually doesn't happen.

I kind of like snowfalls in the South instead. They are rare, but still beautiful and the next day the sun melts them. Then you don't have to look at that ugly combo dirt/snowpile that northern cities have along every single road.
There's a saying that it doesn't "snow on snow" in Denver. That's usually true. It's usually melted in a few days, only to snow again shortly.
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Old 09-05-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
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Originally Posted by ghdana View Post

Glad to be moving south soon. I HATE snow anymore. I live on a dirt road that often isn't even plowed for an entire day, leaving me stranded at home. It isn't so bad if you live in town.
This is when a Subaru comes in handy for most people that live in rural areas of the Snowbelt..
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Old 09-05-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 10,906,266 times
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When I grew up in snow country I use to think that everyplace that had snow got as much as we did. We rarely traveled far from home in winter to know that wasn't true, one reason was because it took so much time to dig out almost every day and not knowing if you'd be able to make it home due to a storm.

Not at all unusual to get a foot of heavy, wet snow every night mid winter and sometimes two feet of it that didn't melt and would result in snow banks piling up on the side of your driveway over your head and very often way over your head. The weight of the snow and near impossibility of lifting it up high enough to pile on top of the previous days made even snowblowing ineffective. Most people would pay someone to plow daily, sometimes twice a day. If you didn't you couldn't move your car as it was like driving through wet cement. It would be up over the fenders of your car and you couldn't mover further than a foot without it pushing up and packing so hard it would be impossible to move.

When I was sixteen we had one of those whopper storms with drifting and I remember sitting on top of the few feet of a telephone pole that was sticking up next to our driveway looking straight down to the one lane for traffic that had been plowed out after waiting a week for emergency crews, and this was on a major state highway thoroughfare. The snow was taller than a two story house after the storm ended.
And this is why I live in Florida now.
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Old 09-05-2014, 06:42 PM
 
12,631 posts, read 10,483,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sgoldie View Post
When I grew up in snow country I use to think that everyplace that had snow got as much as we did. We rarely traveled far from home in winter to know that wasn't true, one reason was because it took so much time to dig out almost every day and not knowing if you'd be able to make it home due to a storm.

Not at all unusual to get a foot of heavy, wet snow every night mid winter and sometimes two feet of it that didn't melt and would result in snow banks piling up on the side of your driveway over your head and very often way over your head. The weight of the snow and near impossibility of lifting it up high enough to pile on top of the previous days made even snowblowing ineffective. Most people would pay someone to plow daily, sometimes twice a day. If you didn't you couldn't move your car as it was like driving through wet cement. It would be up over the fenders of your car and you couldn't mover further than a foot without it pushing up and packing so hard it would be impossible to move.

When I was sixteen we had one of those whopper storms with drifting and I remember sitting on top of the few feet of a telephone pole that was sticking up next to our driveway looking straight down to the one lane for traffic that had been plowed out after waiting a week for emergency crews, and this was on a major state highway thoroughfare. The snow was taller than a two story house after the storm ended.
And this is why I live in Florida now.
With drifts, I assume, it was as tall as a 2 story house? That is insane. The worst storm I personally remember was the day after Christmas 2010, we got 3 feet of snow in my immediate area (it varied by a few inches or up to even a foot in the whole storm range, we got the most) and I remember drifts were up to 6 feet, maybe more. I thought that was bad.

I'm pretty young though. There were certainly worse storms when I was a child and before I was born that my parents and grandparents remember.
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Old 09-05-2014, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 10,906,266 times
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Yeah, you really couldn't walk through it. I first got stuck up to my waist. Very difficult getting out once you sunk in and decided to roll lying down out to the road to distribute the weight. You basically grow up being a prepper out of necessity, extra wood or pellets for your secondary heating system, enough food and water for a month in case you couldn't get to the store or didn't want to carry things as grocery carts were useless, batteries, candles, blankets, etc.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Juneau
601 posts, read 710,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuseumCat View Post
I wouldn't know as I have lived south my whole life. But all you hear from southern weather lovers here is that how blessed we are to have "better" weather because we don't need to shovel snow like those up in north.

But do you really need to though shovel snow there? I would assume those who live in apartments are automatically free of that. But does it really matter is the rest does it or not? What purpose does it serve? Does anything of significance really happen if you don"t?
Snow blowers and plow trucks have cause much stress and anxiety about the future in the snow shovel community.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:34 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,442,655 times
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We got 30 inches of snow last October 4-5. We live on a private road so there are no plows. Someone (not me! haha) usually digs us out with a tractor. Before moving here, I lived in apartments for years. I was never responsible for snow removal, other than digging my car out when I didn't have a garage. Sometimes it really sucked.
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