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Old 09-05-2014, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,083 posts, read 4,869,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rorytmeadows View Post
I understand the humidity,, but not going to church is an advantage down here! No lines for brunch and easy parking at the beach when everyone else is at church!
That plus working slightly a different schedule than most people = win!
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Old 09-05-2014, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,083 posts, read 4,869,414 times
Reputation: 12430
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
This query almost speaks of a troll.

Imagine if the post was "I want to move someplace that never gets hot but I don't want to live in the Northeast, Midwest, or WA, OR, CA, WY, ID, MN, CO."
Again, it doesn't have to be a place that never snows. Just not a place where it generally snows heavily enough to make driving difficult, or require regular shoveling.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC metro
3,518 posts, read 4,404,120 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
This is not 1850 people get over the Civil War.
?
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,199,967 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Stop, please. The coastal south does on rare occasion get snow or ice. I've been there when it happened, in Mobile. And all I'm going to say is it takes a special kind of person to live there with no AC or heat and not be uncomfortable, it's not a at all doable for the average person. Most people also do the majority of their more strenous outdoor activities in the cooler temps of the mornings and evenings, water activities being the big exception.
Yes, the Coastal South quote-on-quote "does get snow or ice on rare occasion", but the same is true for every other subtropical region on Earth, from those in South America to those in the Mediterranean. But what the Coastal South has in common with all these subtropical regions is the fact that snow, ice, or any other form of winter precipitation is rare enough to the point that it by no means can be considered regular, as well as the fact that such events, AT MOST, happen only a couple times a generation.

Define "average person." Are we using the US definition, or are we using the world definition? If we are using the world definition, then the average person is a young Chinese male. Chinese people, along with several other eastern and southern Asian countries, tend to be more familiarized with humid subtropical conditions compared to Northern Europeans, which is where the bulk of US ancestry comes from. Using that, you can then say that the typical person on Earth is familiarized with a humid subtropical climate, like that of the South, and, ergo, can survive in the South with neither A/C nor Heat. People do not abuse A/C and Heat in China, which has a similar, or even more oppressive, subtropical climate than the South. If they can do it, the people in the Coastal South can do it too.

Yep, strenuous outdoor activity in the summer is no problem in the Coastal South; I see loads of people excising, and milling about en-masse even in the heat of the afternoon. And there are the cooler mornings and evenings during the summer, as you mentioned. And during the winter, the Coastal South is obviously a paradise, with the majority of days being sunny, with highs commonly at or above 60F. With such conditions, outdoor activity can be done 365 days a year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
I'm calling a massive BS flag on that one. While the coast may not see ambient temps near 100, the heat index (product of temp + humidity, measured in the shade) is routinely at or above 100 degrees, and I'd bet for a vast majority of people that is intolerably uncomfortable.

Mobile, AL 8/22/2014
2:53 PM Air Temp 93.0 F
Heat Index 105.3 F
Dew Point 75.9 F
Humidity 57%
Lots of powerful sea-breezes are abound in the Coastal South, and lots of summer days in the region feature fluffy clouds that can block the sun, offering relief. And don't forget about the thick, subtropical tree coverage that you get in the South that provide heavy shading, as well as the tropical thunderstorms which massively cool the air. Build a bungalow to capture the features, and you would have no problem living in the Coastal South without A/C and Heat, as the features negate any oppressiveness you put forth to me in your data.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
That poster is on the strangest mission to prove the South is a subtropical paradise lol. He just never quits. When you mention that Mobile went down to the single digits in temps in the 1980's, he talks about how North America is in a cold epoch, while the rest of the world is in a warm epoch. That poster knows nothing about climate or meteo. Just ignore the ramblings.
There are loads of documents that talk about the cold-weather epoch phenomenon that has impacted North America, skewing the averages. Once the pattern eases away for good, you will see how warm the US South really is.

On the other hand, there is no hard evidence, text, or climatologist that agrees with the ideas about the Southern climate you are trying to put forth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
This is a strange post. It can get hotter than hell around here, and the humidity is high. Being native, I love it. Being in a state that has attracted a lot of new comers, this is horrible advice. I have seen many transplants just melt into their foyers and close the door. If you are acclimated, you can more than enjoy the outdoors. Have no illusions though, it's hot down here!
With sea-breezes, partly cloudy skies with puffy clouds, thick subtropical foliage, that provides shade, thunderstorms which cool the air, and mild winter days that are every bit as warm as those in Northern India, I'll assure you that many newcomers are seeing the climate of the Coastal South for the paradise it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Here in Denver (which isn't exactly the north), average daytime highs in January and February are in the 40s and days in the upper 50s/low 60s aren't unheard of. Does it drop down near (and below) zero on occasion? Sure. Is it Minneapolis or Green Bay? No way.

You also highlighted the single most common thing to do in Texas when it's hotter than hell - hang out by the water. A close second is "hang out at the mall/restaurant/any building with a working HVAC system."

Not many people throwing on a backpack and going on a multi-mile hike in mid-July when the ambient temp is 105 and the heat index is 115.
40s for highs, with only a few days in the 50s and 60s during winter in Denver? Please, that is far from paradise, unlike the Coastal South, where AVERAGE highs are in the 60s and 70s, with nice sunny weather. You will never have to worry about snow, ice, or zero degree temps in the Coastal South.

Water activities are only a few of many things people do during a hot summer afternoon in the South, in which temps, by the way, rarely reach 100F, and are instead only from the mid 80s to low 90s. I see people doing all sorts of strenuous activity, including hiking, en-masse in the heat of the afternoon in the Coastal South.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Say that to the crowds on the Comal/Guadalupe River on a 105 degree day and see if they agree.

90+ degrees at 10PM is nice for a night swim, try it and you may like it.

Try barbecuing when it's 15 degrees outside at high noon. Try sitting on the porch swing on a 0 degree evening.

I spend more time outside in a southern summer than I ever did in a northern winter. Even playing in the snow, maybe it is fun for an hour or so then time to go back into the heated house for hot chocolate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Actually in Austin there are lots of outdoor cafes and they are crowded, even on summer evenings.

I have hiked in 105 degree heat but yes I usually jump into the river to cool off along the way.

I could also say that it seems the big thing to do outdoors in winter time is skiing/snowboarding and not hiking or biking. So, saying that swimming and water sports are popular in summer is no different than saying winter sports are popular in winter.
Don't try to reason with those people. Let them remain stuck in their delusions about "people being in the A/C all the time" in the South during summer, forgetting about the fact that a southern summer is much easier to handle the ice-cold temps with thick, heavy snow at the front door.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty011 View Post
Please keep him out of the South. We do not need his ignorance here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
Humidity sucks.. thats the worst part of living in the South the summers with the heat and humidity but we have a nice fall and spring. Everyone is always hating on the South. This is not 1850 people get over the Civil War.
True, people need to stop worrying about the political climate, and culture of the South, and quit remaining obsessed with such a bygone event. I think the very warm weather, beautiful scenery, from lush evergreen subtropical forests and swamps, to the thick subtropical forests of the Appalachians(something not really seen in the mountains of the west), to nice subtropical beaches, and lively, cultured cities like New Orleans, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Miami, far outweigh any cons about the South.

Last edited by Yn0hTnA; 09-05-2014 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,161,688 times
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A fluffy cloud and a tree don't offer much relief from the SUPER HIGH HUMIDITY in the "coastal south."

"forgetting about the fact that a southern summer is much easier to handle the ice-cold temps with thick, heavy snow at the front door."

This isn't fact, it's opinion. I have a very difficult time with high heat and high humidity. The combination destroys me. My running/hiking/cycling season runs from late September through early June. In July and August I'm indoors more often than out, especially during heat waves. I'd rather go for a run in 45-degree brisk sunshine than oppressive 90-degree steam heat 100 times out of 100.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,161,688 times
Reputation: 5637
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
I don't know where in CA you are, but I'm sure you know it's a big place. One person's version is the polar opposite of another's.

Your criteria has eliminated nearly anywhere worth recommending, as many of those places are IN California, or the other states you've given nays. What are the problems with the individual states or the South?

To be completely honest, your once annual Seattle or Portland snow experience will be many levels worse than most snowstorms in many places that get regular snow. Moving to the NW will not shield you from your earthquake fear.

My answer: St. George, UT.

Spoiler
I did it, that's the one.
I think this is the correct answer. The OP eliminated just about every place that met their climate criteria, except this one.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:22 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,503 posts, read 14,330,903 times
Reputation: 23342
When we're in a thread about where to move in the us, and the south comes up and I specifically mention Mobile, well the obviously the "average person" I'm talking about is a young Chinese male. /sarcasm/
I'm also calling you on the BS about "masses" of people doing all sorts of strenuous activities like backpacking in the middle of a hot summer day. I've had family on the coast since the seventies, I know better.
The south has plenty of reasons for people to enjoy living there without having to talk it up as though it's some sort of glorious paradise for everyone.
Quote:
forgetting about the fact that a southern summer is much easier to handle the ice-cold temps with thick, heavy snow at the front door
Plenty of people enjoy their winters and find them easier to handle than humid sticky summers. Why can't you just stick with the fact that in YOUR OPINION the weather is fantastic while acknowledging that many people don't agree and aren't quite as enthusiastic about it as you?
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Say that to the crowds on the Comal/Guadalupe River on a 105 degree day and see if they agree.

90+ degrees at 10PM is nice for a night swim, try it and you may like it.

Try barbecuing when it's 15 degrees outside at high noon. Try sitting on the porch swing on a 0 degree evening.

I spend more time outside in a southern summer than I ever did in a northern winter. Even playing in the snow, maybe it is fun for an hour or so then time to go back into the heated house for hot chocolate.
Well yeah, it's so powerfully hot that the only way to make it bearable is to get semi-naked and hang out in water. This isn't hiking or biking or running or doing anything at all strenuous.

And I have to doubt you are familiar with the north if you don't think people barbecue when it's 15 degrees. Certainly no one is going to "sit in a porch swing" when it's 0 degrees (which happens a few times of year by my house and usually only in the middle of the night), but it's not exactly a fun activity at 105 and high humidity, either.

Weather limits activities during the summer down south and during the winter up north - why pretend either is ideal?
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC metro
3,518 posts, read 4,404,120 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Well yeah, it's so powerfully hot that the only way to make it bearable is to get semi-naked and hang out in water. This isn't hiking or biking or running or doing anything at all strenuous.

And I have to doubt you are familiar with the north if you don't think people barbecue when it's 15 degrees. Certainly no one is going to "sit in a porch swing" when it's 0 degrees (which happens a few times of year by my house and usually only in the middle of the night), but it's not exactly a fun activity at 105 and high humidity, either.

Weather limits activities during the summer down south and during the winter up north - why pretend either is ideal?
Which is why we chose to move South but by the coast. With many water parks within driving range and a big fat lovely ocean!

I do not understand moving to a hot and humid part of the country without relief!
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Old 09-08-2014, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,428,839 times
Reputation: 6153
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
And I have to doubt you are familiar with the north if you don't think people barbecue when it's 15 degrees. Certainly no one is going to "sit in a porch swing" when it's 0 degrees (which happens a few times of year by my house and usually only in the middle of the night), but it's not exactly a fun activity at 105 and high humidity, either.
I'm glad you agree with me. I agree that nobody is going to "sit on a porch swing" when it's 0 degrees, but there will be some people "sitting on a porch swing when it's 105".

I think that there tells the story. You even admit that people can't take the cold enough to do such activities.
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