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View Poll Results: What is Texas?
The South 97 51.87%
The Southwest 22 11.76%
The West 1 0.53%
The Midwest 3 1.60%
Can't categorize it. It's just Texas. 64 34.22%
Voters: 187. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-25-2014, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Ouachita Mtns of Arkansas
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Using the Civil War as a reference point, Texas is in the South. Using geography as a reference point, Texas is in the South (Brownsville) and Southwest (Mexican border) and West (El Paso) and North (Panhandle area). Austin? Well, Austin is in it's own world. You get a little bit of everything in Texas.
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Old 10-25-2014, 04:09 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Prevalence of southern accents = the southern United States.
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Old 10-25-2014, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
Using the Civil War as a reference point, Texas is in the South.
Again, the problem with using the Civil War as a reference point is that the western half of Texas was not settled at the time of the war.

Texas' western half (roughly a line from Burkburnett/Wichita Falls to the south) was still hostile Indian country. Settlement patterns in West Texas were much more akin to those in the southwest as the indians were subdued and removed and the railroads came through.
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Old 10-25-2014, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Ouachita Mtns of Arkansas
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Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Again, the problem with using the Civil War as a reference point is that the western half of Texas was not settled at the time of the war.

Texas' western half (roughly a line from Burkburnett/Wichita Falls to the south) was still hostile Indian country. Settlement patterns in West Texas were much more akin to those in the southwest as the indians were subdued and removed and the railroads came through.
Texas was Texas at the start of the Civil War. Population has not a thing to do with boundaries. Besides, you even stated that the western half was populated by Indians.
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Old 10-25-2014, 10:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Prevalence of southern accents = the southern United States.
Southern is SOOOO much more than just an accent.
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Ouachita Mtns of Arkansas
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Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Southern is SOOOO much more than just an accent.
Absolutely!!! I take great pride in being born in the South and Texas.
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
What? How about the historic opposition to slavery. Appalachia never had a slave economy. Lincoln even mentioned himself that that the Union needed to free Appalachia. How about religion. Appalachia has never, ever had a Southern Baptist majority. Historically most people in the region were Prysberterian. How about the economy? Appalachia never had a cotton based plantation economy.

Appalacia was never aligned with the confederacy during the Cival War. Something very important to remember.
I'm aware of the region's position during the Civil War, which was more divided; it never had slavery (or a cotton-based economy) because of the terrain, which isn't suitable for plantation-style agriculture. Ironically, today it's not very rare to see Confederate flags in the region on license plates, clothing, etc.

There's a more pronounced Presbyterian presence in Appalachia South, but yes it is still MUCH more Southern Baptist than Presbyterian:





Southern Appalachia is also known for its fundamentalist Pentecostal churches, particularly those in the snake-handling tradition (although it's a fading practice): Serpents of the Spirit : In Some Corners of Southern Appalachia, Religion Is a Matter of Faith, Forgiveness, Redemption and, of Course, Snakes - Los Angeles Times

Again, the accents are still Southern (more of a twang than a drawl), the cuisine is Southern, the sports culture is Southern (NASCAR, college football), the music is Southern, the politics/ideologies are Southern, the expressions are Southern (e.g., "bless your heart"), the pasttimes are Southern (hunting and fishing), etc. Southern Appalachia is its own subregion within the South, but is still very much Southern.
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
Using the Civil War as a reference point, Texas is in the South. Using geography as a reference point, Texas is in the South (Brownsville) and Southwest (Mexican border) and West (El Paso) and North (Panhandle area). Austin? Well, Austin is in it's own world. You get a little bit of everything in Texas.
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
Texas was Texas at the start of the Civil War. Population has not a thing to do with boundaries. Besides, you even stated that the western half was populated by Indians.
The western half of Texas was still frontier. The point is that the western half of Texas was settled in a similar manner to the rest of the southwest.

This makes Texas unique compared to any other confederate state where the indian matters had been settled long before the Civil War.
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Old 10-25-2014, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Ouachita Mtns of Arkansas
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" Is Texas part of the South?" ...... That was the Op's question. Texas was not broken down into parts or sections in this question or when it joined the Confederacy.. That's why Texas was in the south at the time of the Civil War. The entire state joined the Confederacy. Not just part of it. It's state lines have changed very little, if any, since then. That's why it's still in the South. It hasn't moved or I would have felt it. The correct answer is a simple...YES.
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