U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What is Texas?
The South 97 51.87%
The Southwest 22 11.76%
The West 1 0.53%
The Midwest 3 1.60%
Can't categorize it. It's just Texas. 64 34.22%
Voters: 187. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-27-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,171,589 times
Reputation: 4350

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
You clearly didn't spend much time in the Asian and Hispanic neighborhoods then.
A city can feel southern for a dozen reasons that have nothing to do with demographics. I'm familiar with these neighborhoods you're talking about but the city still feels southern to me, if that's possible for a major city at all.

And Asians and Hispanics don't have to be un-southern.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
I seriously doubt he "visited all areas" of Houston as he claimed either. I spent 21 years living in that city and there were vast swaths of the metro I never got around to seeing. Houston is massive. Anyone who claims they saw the whole city in a few days is clearly lying.
I doubt he literally means that he explored every single inch of the city, but sampling all of the main sections is indeed possible within 5 days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-27-2014, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,757,980 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I doubt he literally means that he explored every single inch of the city, but sampling all of the main sections is indeed possible within 5 days.
I still have my doubts about that. I guess it just depends on how you define "all the main sections". Houston has a LOT of sections, many of which vary greatly in all kinds of ways, and aren't all close to each other. Some parts of Houston felt to me like they could be on different planets from each other. Houston isn't exactly a "uniform" city. The lack of zoning saw to that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,815 posts, read 6,540,619 times
Reputation: 1546
some of the areas you mentioned yes but it still felt southern.I'm black so of course I was in the more prodemenantly black areas e.g : Greenspoint I spent most of my time in that area. And the over all vibe was still southern. When I visited my uncle in D.C the vibe and atmosphere was far from southern. I really liked the Woodlands area of Houstan as well. Having ethnic neighborhoods in a city does not make it less southern. I didn't see any antebellum mansions and large live oaks draped with moss.Which is what you would see if you visited my city but Houston is a sprawling southern city.

Last edited by PortCity; 10-28-2014 at 04:06 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 06:13 AM
 
13,330 posts, read 17,827,087 times
Reputation: 20040
Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
I was in Houston for 5 days last week and I visited all parts of that city.And I would say that Houston felt southern.
Speed dating?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 07:48 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,171,589 times
Reputation: 4350
Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
some of the areas you mentioned yes but it still felt southern.I'm black so of course I was in the more prodemenantly black areas e.g : Greenspoint I spent most of my time in that area. And the over all vibe was still southern. When I visited my uncle in D.C the vibe and atmosphere was far from southern. I really liked the Woodlands area of Houstan as well. Having ethnic neighborhoods in a city does not make it less southern. I didn't see any antebellum mansions and large live oaks draped with moss.Which is what you would see if you visited my city but Houston is a sprawling southern city.
Most of Houston's 19th century architecture is long gone, but you can still find some of it in the wards surrounding downtown. Check out Sam Houston Park.

Don't know how you missed the live oaks. They're everywhere intown.

Last edited by Gunion Powder; 10-28-2014 at 07:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,815 posts, read 6,540,619 times
Reputation: 1546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Speed dating?
No but I was disapointed in what I saw as far as women maybe I just missed it.I didn't see any beauties until the last day when I visited the Woodlands Mall.If I were to move to Houston which I'm now considering it.That area could be my new home just maybe.

Last edited by PortCity; 10-28-2014 at 09:38 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,815 posts, read 6,540,619 times
Reputation: 1546
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Most of Houston's 19th century architecture is long gone, but you can still find some of it in the wards surrounding downtown. Check out Sam Houston Park.

Don't know how you missed the live oaks. They're everywhere intown.
Yeah I hate I did . I'm not making this a city vs city thread but I liked H town better than the A because it has more of a Gulf culture which I'm unaccustomed to. Though the Gulf culture is more thick in Mobile but that is the edge it has over the A in my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 10:23 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
I did state earlier that the Trans-Pecos part of Texas (not the panhandle) has Southwestern influence, and even conceded to the idea that El Paso and Hudspeth counties (ie. the part of Texas in the Mountain time zone) could arguably be classified as true Southwest. However, I strongly disagree about Central Texas having any real Southwestern traits. Cactus doesn't count. Central TX is Southern, through and through, though it has a unique culture of German, Czech, and Polish heritage that is a big influence on the local culture, and that even extends as far East as the Houston metro. I myself am a descendant of the Polish part of the equation. East TX can even be broken into two sub-regions: the mostly Protestant, Baptist Northeast part (Tyler, Longview, Lufkin, Nacogdoches, Texarkana) and the Cajun-tinged, Catholic-influenced Southeast part (Beaumont, Port Arthur, Orange, Big Thicket area, and some of Houston's far-East suburbs).

I actually do agree with you, though it's very rare, that some states could theoretically be broken into different regions. Nevada is a good example. IMO, only the Southern fifth of that state could accurately be considered Southwestern (ie. Las Vegas). Reno, Winnemucca, and Elko are clearly NOT Southwestern cities, they are just Mountain-West. Certain Great Plains states could be considered Midwestern in their Eastern halves, and more "Frontier-Western" in their Western halves. This has also been heavily debated in these forums. However, the census bureau makes their classifications based upon the more populated areas in each of these states, and in Texas, the vast majority of the state's population resides in the Eastern half of the state. Same goes for the Great Plains states (with the possible exception of South Dakota).



To me, cowboys are just cowboys. Regardless of which state they're in. Their culture is fairly similar from Canada down to Mexico, and from California to Texas. And most true cowboys are pretty rare and endangered these days. Hardly a majority contingent in any state, province, or region.



This ties in with what I was talking about just above. The percentage of population in the Western half of Texas versus the Eastern half is like comparing the population of Rhode Island to the population of Florida. Even more unbalanced if you remove El Paso from the equation. Sure, the rugged Western landscape and climate of far-West TX has had an impact on the local culture, but only on a very small contingent of people. Most people who live in El Paso aren't concerned with how to live off the land.



Houston is 36% Hispanic/Latino, and not only is it a huge city, but it's about as far removed from Trans-Pecos TX as it gets. That's not even taking into account all the other large international communities there. In my experience, just because someone is Hispanic but grew up in Texas, it doesn't make them any less Southern than Anglo/Protestant Texans. I know many Hispanics, both Mexican and several other nationalities in heritage, who self-identify as Southerners. I get your point though. Out there in the TP, the Southwestern influence is a big factor.



Well, I wasn't trying to "win" anything. Just trying to explain why I agree with our government that Texas deserves it's Southern state classification, even if it is much more complex than other Southern states, which it most definitely is.
South Dakota isn't an exception as the majority of the people in that state live in East River.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 10:30 AM
 
13,330 posts, read 17,827,087 times
Reputation: 20040
Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
No but I was disapointed in what I saw as far as women maybe I just missed it.I didn't see any beauties until the last day when I visited the Woodlands Mall.If I were to move to Houston which I'm now considering it.That area could be my new home just maybe.
Went over your head:>) You cannot have a qualified opinion about a city as diverse as Houston in five days as visitor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,757,980 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
South Dakota isn't an exception as the majority of the people in that state live in East River.
You quoted all of that, just to tell me this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top