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View Poll Results: What is Texas?
The South 97 51.87%
The Southwest 22 11.76%
The West 1 0.53%
The Midwest 3 1.60%
Can't categorize it. It's just Texas. 64 34.22%
Voters: 187. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-28-2014, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I lived in Alpine (in the Big Bend) many years ago. Even though the landscape is Western, and the lifestyle for many is ranching, I still would call it part of The South, because of the Southern Baptist dominance of the local culture. There may have been even be more Catholics, but,

Hmmm, now that I come to think of it, the day to day social scene for European Americans was Baptist dominated (Southern) while the day to day social scene for Hispanics was Catholic dominated (Southwestern).

At the time I lived there, sad to say, there was a definite social divide based on race/religion.

So I guess maybe the town was Southern and Southwestern both, with not much meeting in the middle.
Things have changes somewhat in Alpine in terms of less discrimination toward the Hispanics but the town is still divided by the railroad tracks. Everybody south of the tracks is Hispanic and pretty much everybody north of the tracks is Anglo. And unlike east Texas which is 100% deep south, there are effectively no African Americans in Alpine. To me, significant populations of African Americans are a hallmark of a traditional southern community.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Things have changes somewhat in Alpine in terms of less discrimination toward the Hispanics but the town is still divided by the railroad tracks. Everybody south of the tracks is Hispanic and pretty much everybody north of the tracks is Anglo. And unlike east Texas which is 100% deep south, there are effectively no African Americans in Alpine. To me, significant populations of African Americans are a hallmark of a traditional southern community.
I always felt the same way. Which is why I put places like Appalachia in their own category.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Things have changes somewhat in Alpine in terms of less discrimination toward the Hispanics but the town is still divided by the railroad tracks. Everybody south of the tracks is Hispanic and pretty much everybody north of the tracks is Anglo. And unlike east Texas which is 100% deep south, there are effectively no African Americans in Alpine. To me, significant populations of African Americans are a hallmark of a traditional southern community.
So, Chicago's South side, South-Central L.A., Harlem, many parts of Brooklyn, North Philly, Oakland, D.C., Baltimore, and pretty much all of Detroit are traditional Southern communities?
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
So, Chicago's South side, South-Central L.A., Harlem, many parts of Brooklyn, North Philly, Oakland, D.C., Baltimore, and pretty much all of Detroit are traditional Southern communities?
I would imagine so.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:52 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
I always felt the same way. Which is why I put places like Appalachia in their own category.
There are a lot more towns with significant Black population in Appalachia than you might think. The small town were my dad was born in Eastern KY is 24% Black, the next town over is 20%. Asheville NC is 17%, Huntington WV is 10%. No doubt that way below the Deep South but it's also more than the rural Midwest or West Coast outside the largest cites.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
I would imagine so.
So, is the world also flat? The moon made of cheese?
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Old 10-28-2014, 05:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
There are a lot more towns with significant Black population in Appalachia than you might think. The small town were my dad was born in Eastern KY is 24% Black, the next town over is 20%. Asheville NC is 17%, Huntington WV is 10%. No doubt that way below the Deep South but it's also more than the rural Midwest or West Coast outside the largest cites.
Are you looking at city limits? Or county limits? My grandmother lives in Burksville, KY. And the city limits there have a population that is 10-15% black, but the county as a whole, which is where most of the people are located, has a black percentage of only 3-4%. Buncombe County (Ashville, NC) is only 7-8% black.

You can never use city limits for anything. City limits always cover too little or too much to tell the full story about an area.
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Old 10-28-2014, 05:06 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Yeah right. You know Hispanics with Southern accents? I am born and raised in Florida, one of the most Hispanic states in our nation and I have never seen that.
I see, but I thought the topic of discussion was Texas.
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Old 10-28-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I see, but I thought the topic of discussion was Texas.
Well I know a lot of Hispanics from Texas and they don't have a southern accent either.
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Old 10-28-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Well I know a lot of Hispanics from Texas and they don't have a southern accent either.
You may know "a lot" but you do not know them all, and you obviously do not know the ones that do have southern accents.
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