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Old 11-12-2014, 08:10 PM
 
462 posts, read 582,278 times
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I think it has something to do with being in the anglosphere, and the most common surnames still including ones from the British Isles: Smith, Johnson, Williams, Jones, Brown, Davis, Miller, Wilson, Moore, Taylor, Anderson, Thomas, Jackson, White, Harris, Martin, Thompson, Garcia...oh wait, we are "flooded" with Hispanic and non-anglo surnames.

Most Common Surnames [Last Names] in the United States (top 1000)

Looking through the list of Presidents and influential people in American history, I see a lot of "British" names. Dutch had their thing going in the greater NYC area, and this produced the Vanderbilts, Roosevelts, Van Burens, etc, but overall it was pretty compatible with the Anglo Saxon thing. German influence wasn't very big until the mid 1800s. They came over with the Irish waves of immigrants. Many were seen as Catholic invaders like the Irish by the Know Nothing party.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:50 PM
 
215 posts, read 296,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
I think it has something to do with being in the anglosphere, and the most common surnames still including ones from the British Isles: Smith, Johnson, Williams, Jones, Brown, Davis, Miller, Wilson, Moore, Taylor, Anderson, Thomas, Jackson, White, Harris, Martin, Thompson, Garcia...oh wait, we are "flooded" with Hispanic and non-anglo surnames.

Most Common Surnames [Last Names] in the United States (top 1000)

Looking through the list of Presidents and influential people in American history, I see a lot of "British" names. Dutch had their thing going in the greater NYC area, and this produced the Vanderbilts, Roosevelts, Van Burens, etc, but overall it was pretty compatible with the Anglo Saxon thing. German influence wasn't very big until the mid 1800s. They came over with the Irish waves of immigrants. Many were seen as Catholic invaders like the Irish by the Know Nothing party.
many also had their names anglicized or americanized to fit in to the broader Anglo-American culture and not be discriminated against too, especially in housing and jobs.
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:09 PM
 
215 posts, read 296,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyIsTheLimt View Post
Anyone who generalizes Americans to be of one racial or cultural group is ignorant. This country is probably the most diverse country on Earth where various races and cultures live and swear their allegiance to the American flag while maintaining their roots. Think about the Italian Americans around NY/NJ/PA or the Hispanic Americans on the west coast and south.

It probably had an Anglo Saxon origin when it was founded but I think those roots are mostly diluted now with immigration through out the 20th century which is continuing till date and will keep continuing. I think America will keep getting more and more diverse and eventually will look something like Brazil with a distinct identity of it's own.
Brazil has its own distinct identity in about the same way America does.
Brazil is Latin American culture with Afro-Brasillian aspects, Hispanic, etc...
same with America, Anglo American/Western, historical African-American cultural aspects etc..

you are confusing someone's ancestral background with culture

even though many Italian Americans, for example may have spoken Italian at home, they conformed and adapted to the LARGER and BROADER Anglo-culture or what we call American/Western culture etc..


for all the diverse ethnic groups and races here, there are certain things they ALL share in common, and the broader American (Anglo/Western) culture is one of them.

The only cultures here that are drastically different and that affects a large part of the population is the culture many Hispanic immigrants have brought with them in recent times and even parts of that is somewhat americanized (USA) in a sublte way.

Muslims and Middle Eastern immigrants also cling largely to their own culture but they also adapt to the broader American culture too and their children are typically more or less fully Americanized, speaking from my own experience.

Religion being the only noticeable difference.

even european immigrants, from places like Serbia who have come here in recent times adapt to the broader Anglo/Western culture and especially so do their children.

America is diverse, and people keep alive certain aspects of their own culture but in large terms and broadly speaking, they also adopt and adapt to the pre-existing western/american/anglo culture in place and become americanized.

even African Americans are American by culture. with every little in common with modern Africa, except for small influences.
saying America is an anglo-nation is just basically saying it is part of the western world and by comparison the vast majority of America's cultural influences largely have some sort of origin in/come from the British Isles, but along with some other less obvious, more subtle or less prominent influences, too.

America is an Anglo Nation, although no one here actually uses that term.

and when people come here, even if they keep their own traditions alive, they also adopt and adapt to the broader wester/anglo/american culture and their children are usually Americanized with western/anglo culture, regardless of their race or where they came from.

again, Hispanic immigrants maybe the real exception but its not like they dont adopt american culture, they just keep more of theirs alive than other immigrant groups.

as for your comment, personally I dont see Italians in NY being any less american than anyone else, just simply because some still speak italian at times and they have things handed down to them

but they are still a part of the larger american/western culture, IMO.

ask people actually FROM Italy and see what they say about Italian Americans.....most will agree.

you act as if Irish Americans, Polish Americans African Americans and Italians etc... just keep to their own ethnic enclaves and have nothing much in common culturally than merely living under the same flag here?
thats stupid.
IMO, all of these people are Americans first........there is a broader culture in place and its largely shared by all americans, no matter how diverse their backgrounds maybe.

culturally an African American has more in common with a White American than with an Afro-Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, or modern day Liberian.
so what does that tell you?

and it is possible for someone to be a part of more than one culture at the same time.
nothing about culture is inherently fixed, either. people can adapt and adopt into one while being part of another too.
it's not like skin color. It's not a fixed trait.

Last edited by Tenn82; 11-12-2014 at 11:01 PM..
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:25 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,129 posts, read 9,898,127 times
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^ Pretty much nailed it.
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Old 11-13-2014, 06:47 AM
 
Location: California
22 posts, read 17,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
I think it has something to do with being in the anglosphere, and the most common surnames still including ones from the British Isles: Smith, Johnson, Williams, Jones, Brown, Davis, Miller, Wilson, Moore, Taylor, Anderson, Thomas, Jackson, White, Harris, Martin, Thompson, Garcia...oh wait, we are "flooded" with Hispanic and non-anglo surnames.

Most Common Surnames [Last Names] in the United States (top 1000)

Looking through the list of Presidents and influential people in American history, I see a lot of "British" names. Dutch had their thing going in the greater NYC area, and this produced the Vanderbilts, Roosevelts, Van Burens, etc, but overall it was pretty compatible with the Anglo Saxon thing. German influence wasn't very big until the mid 1800s. They came over with the Irish waves of immigrants. Many were seen as Catholic invaders like the Irish by the Know Nothing party.

The two highlighted families are actually more British than Dutch.
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Old 11-13-2014, 07:21 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,129 posts, read 9,898,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RMoore36 View Post
The two highlighted families are actually more British than Dutch.
I think he meant they had Dutch roots.
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Old 12-02-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
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The US is still essentially an Anglo based culture from our language, to our laws, and literature like Dickens, Peter Pan, King Arthur, Shakesphere etc. But there's large non Anglo influences that make American culture distinct.

Like American cuisine is sharply distinct from other Anglo based cultures where items like Fish and Chips and Meat Pies are still popular in countries like Australia and New Zealand. The American staples like Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, and Pretzels have german origins. Southern American cuisine has Native American/African/French influences. And Southwestern cuisine has Mexican/Spanish influences.

Another difference is the sports culture. Sports like Cricket and Rugby got Americanized as Baseball and American Football. While no other English speaking country other than Canada plays those sports. The other English speaking countries mainly play Cricket, Rugby, and Soccer.

I'd say that the US is more than just "The UK across the ocean", which is becoming more different each generation.
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Old 01-23-2015, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Miami was founded in the 1890s by Americans, not Spaniards. Also, I'm Cuban, and I'm ALSO offended by the lack of English spoken there ._.
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Old 06-17-2015, 11:36 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,293,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyIsTheLimt View Post
I think America will keep getting more and more diverse and eventually will look something like Brazil with a distinct identity of it's own.
I recall coming across a comment that the U.S. mainstream is already a kind of creole culture, affected by diverse influences. Food would be one example. Another would be music-there were European/African cultural fusions, such as jazz, rock, etc.

Of course, there are the old Anglo roots, which influenced the legal system, the political system, etc. As for continental European culture, there are traces.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 06-17-2015 at 11:47 PM..
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Old 06-18-2015, 01:24 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,193,093 times
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The west is becoming Americanized, I don't think we really have an Anglian culture anymore - we have our own way of governing, we have our own traditions. The only thing we hold similar is English - which has really become more of an international standard than a cultural identity.

Besides, the cultural differences between California and Alabama are far too vast to fit into a pot and call them Anglian. That's why we have threads like "NY v CA" all the time.
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