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Old 10-21-2014, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Denver
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A city with a downtown is a city.
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:50 PM
 
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Cities are designated in most states by government style, not population, but personally I consider a city to be over 100,000 people, with a skyline of some sort and a prominent downtown.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Cities are designated in most states by government style, not population, but personally I consider a city to be over 100,000 people, with a skyline of some sort and a prominent downtown.
So Green Bay, WI, home of the NFL's Green Bay Packers, isn't a city? It just recently cracked 100,000, has no skyline and does not have a prominent downtown.

What would you call it, then?

How about Duluth, MN? Well under 100,000, but has a bit of a skyline and prominent downtown.

This differs by region. The only time you need hard numbers to define the terminology is via stats. It simply doesn't work that way in the real world.
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Old 10-22-2014, 03:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
So Green Bay, WI, home of the NFL's Green Bay Packers, isn't a city? It just recently cracked 100,000, has no skyline and does not have a prominent downtown.

What would you call it, then?

How about Duluth, MN? Well under 100,000, but has a bit of a skyline and prominent downtown.

This differs by region. The only time you need hard numbers to define the terminology is via stats. It simply doesn't work that way in the real world.
Toms River, New Jersey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sounds like this township to me but with a football team and 13000 more people. Green Bay is only slightly bigger in area, 55 to 52 square miles.

That's a township, not even a town. Guess things are done differently here. There are towns with fewer people though, most have fewer people.
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 681,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Toms River, New Jersey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sounds like this township to me but with a football team and 13000 more people. Green Bay is only slightly bigger in area, 55 to 52 square miles.

That's a township, not even a town. Guess things are done differently here. There are towns with fewer people though, most have fewer people.
Hmmm. OK

One other difference would be that Green Bay is the center of its own MSA. Toms River, in Ocean County, is part of the endless suburbs in the NYC MSA.
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Old 10-23-2014, 07:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by EricNorthman View Post
Hmmm. OK

One other difference would be that Green Bay is the center of its own MSA. Toms River, in Ocean County, is part of the endless suburbs in the NYC MSA.
What other city is near Green Bay, close enough to be part of the MSA? I genuinely don't know. Like I said, I guess things are different here. NJ is small and virtually everywhere you are in the state you are close enough for at least a day trip to NYC and Philly. Ocean County at it's closest to Philly, also, is about 50 miles. Why would a township or even a city that large be its own MSA in a small state bordering 2 major US cities? It's just different.

In regards to towns, which you seem to not have understood, in NJ the government hierarchy is basically city - town - township - borough. Towns are usually larger in size and population than townships, but as shown in the case of Toms River, not always.
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Old 10-23-2014, 07:47 AM
 
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The closest city to Green Bay is Milwaukee at around 120 miles. Perhaps the Appleton area would count.
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Old 10-23-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Austin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
What other city is near Green Bay, close enough to be part of the MSA? I genuinely don't know. Like I said, I guess things are different here. NJ is small and virtually everywhere you are in the state you are close enough for at least a day trip to NYC and Philly. Ocean County at it's closest to Philly, also, is about 50 miles. Why would a township or even a city that large be its own MSA in a small state bordering 2 major US cities? It's just different.

In regards to towns, which you seem to not have understood, in NJ the government hierarchy is basically city - town - township - borough. Towns are usually larger in size and population than townships, but as shown in the case of Toms River, not always.
To the part in bold, that was my point, which you didn't seem to understand. It is its own independent city. That is how it differs from Toms River. A city of similar population can seem much more like a genuine city when it is by itself rather than part of continuous suburbia.

I wish I had a dollar for every post on this forum about being close enough for a day trip to NYC. It is in every thread, whether it is relevant or not.

As far as discussion of towns and how New Jersey categorizes its settlements, it's not that I didn't get it. I just don't see the relevance. The original post was about perception, not how things should be done elsewhere as in NJ.
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Old 10-23-2014, 04:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricNorthman View Post
To the part in bold, that was my point, which you didn't seem to understand. It is its own independent city. That is how it differs from Toms River. A city of similar population can seem much more like a genuine city when it is by itself rather than part of continuous suburbia.

I wish I had a dollar for every post on this forum about being close enough for a day trip to NYC. It is in every thread, whether it is relevant or not.

As far as discussion of towns and how New Jersey categorizes its settlements, it's not that I didn't get it. I just don't see the relevance. The original post was about perception, not how things should be done elsewhere as in NJ.
And MY point was that around here, Green Bay probably wouldn't be considered a city, or it would be a very small one without its own teams or anything like that. It would probably be most comparable to Elizabeth or Paterson (which are actually both bigger in population than Green Bay), which are technically cities by government standard but they're severely outshone by Newark, Jersey City, and New York. They are cities but not THE city. No reason to go there unless you have family there, really. All the attractions are in larger, true cities.

What about day trips?... It's true. I wasn't saying it randomly, I was attributing it to how Toms River or a municipality of its size would not be that relevant given NYC and Philly are extremely close. Again - it's just different here than it is in Wisconsin, I guess. When I'm used to New York, what can you expect? It shouldn't be a surprise that what I think of a city is a bit different, given where I live and the type of region this is.
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Old 10-23-2014, 05:18 PM
 
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10,000 and up is a city and 9,999 and down is a town.
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