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Old 10-24-2014, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,426 posts, read 12,430,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 73-79 ford fan View Post
10,000 and up is a city and 9,999 and down is a town.
and how many people = a village?
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Old 10-24-2014, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,401,664 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Again - it's just different here than it is in Wisconsin, I guess. When I'm used to New York, what can you expect? It shouldn't be a surprise that what I think of a city is a bit different, given where I live and the type of region this is.
Well yeah, that was my entire point throughout this thread. In the real world, you can't use a number set, you have to use your noggin.
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Old 10-24-2014, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,750 posts, read 3,857,018 times
Reputation: 3565
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Well yeah, that was my entire point throughout this thread. In the real world, you can't use a number set, you have to use your noggin.
Our largest town (not a city) in NY has a population of 760,000 within town limits, which is bigger than your Milwaukee which is a city. It borders another two towns that have populations of 226,000 and 300,000 respectively. None of these places are cities and they do not show up on the list of largest US cities during the census for example... just like Tom's River in NJ. They are all towns that are overshadowed by NYC that is close by.
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Old 10-24-2014, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Our largest town (not a city) in NY has a population of 760,000 within town limits, which is bigger than your Milwaukee which is a city. It borders another two towns that have populations of 226,000 and 300,000 respectively. None of these places are cities and they do not show up on the list of largest US cities during the census for example... just like Tom's River in NJ. They are all towns that are overshadowed by NYC that is close by.
Exactly. And in Wyoming, Green Bay would be a megalopolis. This all depends on where in the country the location is, what purpose it serves, etc.
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Old 10-24-2014, 01:35 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Our largest town (not a city) in NY has a population of 760,000 within town limits, which is bigger than your Milwaukee which is a city. It borders another two towns that have populations of 226,000 and 300,000 respectively. None of these places are cities and they do not show up on the list of largest US cities during the census for example... just like Tom's River in NJ. They are all towns that are overshadowed by NYC that is close by.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Exactly. And in Wyoming, Green Bay would be a megalopolis. This all depends on where in the country the location is, what purpose it serves, etc.
It is crazy (but not in a bad way) to me how that works and how different things are in other places.

To answer your question, cheeseplate (I think it was you), would I consider Green Bay a city? Probably not, but it is anyway and that is obviously fine. My example of Toms River was just to show why I would not consider it to be a city.
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Old 10-24-2014, 02:27 PM
 
56,679 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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What would you consider these municipalities? https://www.google.com/maps/@42.1430...PrI5SgH-gA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Jo...1af07abac381e3

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.1024...suZurzamxA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3272...IANkz-WUfA!2e0
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Old 10-24-2014, 02:37 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
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Infrastructure-wise they all look a lot like local town/township downtowns in northern NJ.
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Old 10-24-2014, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,391 posts, read 59,880,407 times
Reputation: 54036
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
And MY point was that around here, Green Bay probably wouldn't be considered a city, or it would be a very small one without its own teams or anything like that.
Trenton is a city. Camden is a city. Both are smaller than Green Bay. What aren't you getting?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
It is crazy (but not in a bad way) to me how that works and how different things are in other places.
It's not crazy; it's just different. Most people can comprehend this, and even appreciate it.
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Old 10-24-2014, 06:25 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
Reputation: 17606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Trenton is a city. Camden is a city. Both are smaller than Green Bay. What aren't you getting?


It's not crazy; it's just different. Most people can comprehend this, and even appreciate it.
I've ready pointed out how small cities like Camden and Trenton are not "true" cities in this area; New York and Philly are, even Jersey City and Newark. Small cities are overshadowed and while they're cities by government standards, they're not THE cities of the area and everyone knows that. They may as well be towns, they function more like towns in the region because of the larger American cities extremely close by.

I was one of the first ones to say things are different between the states, you don't need to tell me. And I said it's not a bad type of crazy or a bad type of different - reading helps.
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Old 10-25-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,391 posts, read 59,880,407 times
Reputation: 54036


I have no doubt that if New York, Newark and -- what's your other paragon of "true" urban culture? Oh, yes, Jersey City -- were to vanish into thin air tomorrow, that cities such as Trenton and Camden would carry on without a blip.
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