U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:10 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585

Advertisements

So the discussions on regional identity as of late have gotten me to wonder if the Northeast actually is uniformly similar. Whenever someone argues that an area is Northeastern, they appeal to ethnic groups, or architecture, politics, or linguistics. However, are there actually consistent patterns in the Northeastern US that reflect this?

For example, are the ethnic groups of Pennsylvania the same as New York or Maine? Are the linguistics the same? Or is the Northeast a diverse region with different linguistics and ethnic groups, and even architecture? I feel like classifying New England is easy, but calling an area "Northeastern in feel" is really ambiguous because I don't feel the Northeastern US has anything unique to it outside of geographical regions within. For example, the NY accent is pretty unique, as is the New England accent, as they are not found much outside of those respective areas. But when you go to Buffalo people sound more like Chicagoans.

I have "Northeastern" blood in my veins. When my family came over from the old world they came through NY and settled there and Massachusetts. I have close family in Pittsburgh and New York City, and those two places are vastly different in more ways than one. The commonality they share are they in the same geographical area. Also whenever I go to New Hampshire, it doesn't remind me of Pittsburgh. Certainly not when I hear people talk. What are your thoughts? What patterns are consistent across the Northeast that you find nowhere else in the country? Or any other region for that matter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:24 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,329 posts, read 19,597,329 times
Reputation: 13122
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Whenever someone argues that an area is Northeastern, they appeal to ethnic groups, or architecture, politics, or linguistics. However, are there actually consistent patterns in the Northeastern US that reflect this?
The northeastern US is characterized and defined by the following:

Large, compact, walkable cities with extensive public transportation, a high population density, a highly educated populace, high incomes especially from white-collar jobs, high cost of living, liberal politics, a strong historical connection to the founding of the United States, a distinct 4-season climate and east coast location, of course.

That pretty much sums it up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:28 AM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,538,210 times
Reputation: 17611
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
So the discussions on regional identity as of late have gotten me to wonder if the Northeast actually is uniformly similar. Whenever someone argues that an area is Northeastern, they appeal to ethnic groups, or architecture, politics, or linguistics. However, are there actually consistent patterns in the Northeastern US that reflect this?

For example, are the ethnic groups of Pennsylvania the same as New York or Maine? Are the linguistics the same? Or is the Northeast a diverse region with different linguistics and ethnic groups, and even architecture? I feel like classifying New England is easy, but calling an area "Northeastern in feel" is really ambiguous because I don't feel the Northeastern US has anything unique to it outside of geographical regions within. For example, the NY accent is pretty unique, as is the New England accent, as they are not found much outside of those respective areas. But when you go to Buffalo people sound more like Chicagoans.

I have "Northeastern" blood in my veins. When my family came over from the old world they came through NY and settled there and Massachusetts. I have close family in Pittsburgh and New York City, and those two places are vastly different in more ways than one. The commonality they share are they in the same geographical area. Also whenever I go to New Hampshire, it doesn't remind me of Pittsburgh. Certainly not when I hear people talk. What are your thoughts? What patterns are consistent across the Northeast that you find nowhere else in the country? Or any other region for that matter.
Pittsburgh is on the fringes of another region. It is often discussed here whether or not Pittsburgh is more Midwestern. Same with western NY cities. The core of the northeast (major cities, the NE Corridor) are very similar in most ways. The outlying states (Maine, Vermont, Western Pennsylvania) are less similar to their denser, urban counterparts but I do still think there is a general regional similarity going on. You can't get much more northeastern than ME and VT geographically speaking so even though those states are less populated and dense, can they really be classified as anything else?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:33 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Pittsburgh is on the fringes of another region. It is often discussed here whether or not Pittsburgh is more Midwestern. Same with western NY cities. The core of the northeast (major cities, the NE Corridor) are very similar in most ways. The outlying states (Maine, Vermont, Western Pennsylvania) are less similar to their denser, urban counterparts but I do still think there is a general regional similarity going on. You can't get much more northeastern than ME and VT geographically speaking so even though those states are less populated and dense, can they really be classified as anything else?
You speak truth. Geographically VT, NH, and ME can't be anything BUT Northeast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale AZ
556 posts, read 633,652 times
Reputation: 655
We needed another thread dedicated to the northeast
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:35 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The northeastern US is characterized and defined by the following:

Large, compact, walkable cities with extensive public transportation, a high population density, a highly educated populace, high incomes especially from white-collar jobs, high cost of living, liberal politics, a strong historical connection to the founding of the United States, a distinct 4-season climate and east coast location, of course.

That pretty much sums it up.
Interesting. Some appeal to certain cities' blue collar-ness as proof they are Northeastern. Your description would put cities like Pittsburgh out of that region.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,455 posts, read 11,958,801 times
Reputation: 10567
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Large, compact, walkable cities with extensive public transportation,
True to some degree due to the long-era of settlement. But not all Northeastern cities are large, and not all of the northeast is urban.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
a high population density,
Plenty of Northern New England, Upstate NY, and Central/Western Pennsylvania has low population densities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
a highly educated populace,
Pennsylvania, Maine, Rhode Island, and Delaware are not particularly highly educated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
high incomes especially from white-collar jobs,
Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island are not high-income states.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
high cost of living,
Again, depends upon where. You can buy a house for under $100,000 in parts of rural northern New England, Upstate NY, and Pennsylvania.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
liberal politics,
Tell that to Central Pennsylvania.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
a strong historical connection to the founding of the United States,
True, but you'd have to lump Virginia in the Northeast by this measure. Perhaps the Carolinas and Georgia as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
a distinct 4-season climate
Midwest has this too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
east coast location, of course.
Vermont and Pennsylvania have no coastline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:43 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Eschaton, you!!!!

Also, tell the liberal politics thing to Southern New Hampshire residents who escaped Massachusetts BECAUSE of liberal politics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:47 AM
 
Location: New York NY
4,274 posts, read 6,361,890 times
Reputation: 9087
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The northeastern US is characterized and defined by the following:

Large, compact, walkable cities with extensive public transportation, a high population density, a highly educated populace, high incomes especially from white-collar jobs, high cost of living, liberal politics, a strong historical connection to the founding of the United States, a distinct 4-season climate and east coast location, of course.

That pretty much sums it up.
Not quite. This is a rough description of the CITIES of the Northeast, not the entire region. While most of the population is in urban metros, most of the geographic territory is not--and millions of people live there. When when you leave the cities of the Boston-Washington corridor it's pretty easy to find life that is 180 degrees from what's described here. (Except for the climate and historical connections).

The "vibe" you'd find in western and southern NJ, upstate NY, interior Maine, most of Pennsylvania, and most of New Hampshire, e.g, are as "Middle America" as you'll find anywhere else in the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 11:53 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,329 posts, read 19,597,329 times
Reputation: 13122
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
True to some degree due to the long-era of settlement. But not all Northeastern cities are large, and not all of the northeast is urban.

Plenty of Northern New England, Upstate NY, and Central/Western Pennsylvania has low population densities.

Pennsylvania, Maine, Rhode Island, and Delaware are not particularly highly educated.

Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island are not high-income states.

Again, depends upon where. You can buy a house for under $100,000 in parts of rural northern New England, Upstate NY, and Pennsylvania.

Tell that to Central Pennsylvania.

True, but you'd have to lump Virginia in the Northeast by this measure. Perhaps the Carolinas and Georgia as well.

Midwest has this too.

Vermont and Pennsylvania have no coastline.
The "main drag" of the northeastern U.S. where the bulk of the population and economy is located was what my post was refering to.

That's what distinguishes the northeast from other regions. The rural areas not so much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top