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Old 03-15-2018, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,997,005 times
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I've seen people say SC is part of the 'Deep South' but in 1968, SC voted GOP when it voted for Nixon, along with other historically Democrat southern states Tenn, NC, VA, and Florida.

The 'Deep South' states , Alabama, Miss, etc voted for the racist Dixiecrat candidate George Wallace.

https://www.270towin.com/1968_Election/

I think 'Deep South' was used to described southern states that were added after the US gained its independence. I'm surprised people still use the expression today in the post slavery/segregation era.

SC was one of the original southern colonies so to me it makes no sense to to describe it as 'deep' south.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 03-15-2018 at 10:44 PM..

 
Old 03-15-2018, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,732 posts, read 23,155,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Maybe historically, yes. But in 2018, absolutely not.
 
Old 03-15-2018, 10:40 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,983 posts, read 2,139,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Redneck = rural white person, usually of Anglo/British descent

Hillbilly = Scots-Irish from the Appalachians and Ozarks

Most Hillbillies are rednecks but not all rednecks are Hillbillies.
I have always wondered why the folks who live in the Northern Appalachian Montains are not considered "Hillbilies", but the folks who live in the Southern Appalachian Mountains are considered "Hillbillies". An oversight? A double-standard? Northerners with a superiority complex who have nothing but disdain for anything Southern?
 
Old 03-15-2018, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I have always wondered why the folks who live in the Northern Appalachian Montains are not considered "Hillbilies", but the folks who live in the Southern Appalachian Mountains are considered "Hillbillies". An oversight? A double-standard? Northerners with a superiority complex who have nothing but disdain for anything Southern?
Oh trust me, we are often considered hillbillies by many elitists. It's just not as saturated in the collective minds of the public. As an example, Pennsylvania is for some reason the major punching-bag of the northeast elitism, even within its own borders. Maine as well gets frequently picked on by its immediate neighbors. New York state has an identity crisis the likes of which would make China seem collected.

There are multiple factors at play.

One, some northerners deny to the death that any "culture" they find unfavorable could possibly exist in their home state/region.

Two, many southerners who take pride in the titles like redneck convince themselves that the rural culture they personally favor is exclusively southern.

Three, it sometimes boils down to a difference in regional dialect. There are different names for the same kind of people up here whereas both redneck and hillbilly have their roots in referring to southern people. Generally northerners will refer to rural people in the north as "backwards", "the religious sort", "yokels", and yes, historically in some areas, "Yankees".

Four, and this is the big one in my opinion, the north focuses more on urban rivalry. People in the north often bad-mouth other cities rather than the small communities between them. To most urban northerners, the space between cities doesn't really exist. Whereas the rural cultures of the south are more known and prevalent in the public mind because there are less major metros in said region.

Five, a slight difference in approach. In the north, elitists consider the northern country-side to be a place to buy land, route the natives, and retire in a third home on a lake or mountain while shoving their wealth down the local's throats. Those same elitists consider the southern country-side a place to avoid because generally, rural southerners are more free to enact violence against a big jerk. In the north, litigation always finds its target. This, of course, still does not stop them all from buying land in southern states.

It's not that the rural folk in either region are really all that different, it's how the collective conscious of the masses perceive them. In truth, a mountain man from New Hampshire and his counter-part from Tennessee are not likely to be too at odds with one-another.
 
Old 03-15-2018, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania = North Mid-Atlantic

Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia = South Mid-Atlantic

I personally prefer "upper" and "lower" as opposed to northern and southern.

Aside from that, I know this. My scenario is specifically geared toward Kode's perspective. Truth is as part of the overall Mid-Atlantic, that still gives Maryland more ties to the north than the south.
 
Old 03-16-2018, 04:13 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,209 posts, read 2,825,676 times
Reputation: 4497
There is absolutely a light redneck-y vibe in Pittsburgh. And Vermont and New Hampshire, BIG redneck aura. And parts of Upstate New York? Very redneck-y...

All "redneck" means to me is a form of poor to working class contemporary white American culture. It's not the only form, but it is "a" form of poor to working class white culture. It's harder to define, and easier to recognize when you see it...
 
Old 03-16-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I personally prefer "upper" and "lower" as opposed to northern and southern.
I think that works if for no other reason it does not bring up the eternal debate of where the line between the cultural North and South lies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Aside from that, I know this. My scenario is specifically geared toward Kode's perspective. Truth is as part of the overall Mid-Atlantic, that still gives Maryland more ties to the north than the south.
In my own experience in Maryland, the division between North and South is along an east-west axis. Interior Maryland has more Southern traits while the cities in the eastern part of the state are transitional/Northern.

But then again, rural people living in the Maryland Tidewater (or equivalent) seem to have a lot in common with their Southern coastal neighbors.
 
Old 03-16-2018, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
I've seen people say SC is part of the 'Deep South' but in 1968, SC voted GOP when it voted for Nixon, along with other historically Democrat southern states Tenn, NC, VA, and Florida.

The 'Deep South' states , Alabama, Miss, etc voted for the racist Dixiecrat candidate George Wallace.

https://www.270towin.com/1968_Election/

I think 'Deep South' was used to described southern states that were added after the US gained its independence. I'm surprised people still use the expression today in the post slavery/segregation era.

SC was one of the original southern colonies so to me it makes no sense to to describe it as 'deep' south.
I think today people think of the deep south as being the lowland south below NC, TN and sometimes middle-Arkansas. It has more to do with topography, climate and direction now.
 
Old 03-16-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,514 posts, read 7,456,802 times
Reputation: 10912
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I think today people think of the deep south as being the lowland south below NC, TN and sometimes middle-Arkansas. It has more to do with topography, climate and direction now.
Yes your right, the “Deep South” simply is a term to differentiate the lowland coastal south from the mountain and upland south.
 
Old 03-16-2018, 03:44 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,728 posts, read 6,137,255 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
Maybe historically, yes. But in 2018, absolutely not.
What makes it not southern today then?
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