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Old 10-28-2014, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,041,891 times
Reputation: 3599

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michele87 View Post
Wha, it seems like Texas is not as hot as I thought it was during the summer. It is suitable then! I think I can get used to hot summers, if the winters are warm too. And I guess the air is dry in the west, no? I hate humid heat. The problem I had with Sofia was that the change between the seasons was too extreme for my liking and the humidity sometimes is too much despite not having any big rivers. I also dislike the rainy days here in the Netherlands, so sunny Texas sounds nice. No earthquakes, women talking with sexy (southern?) accents and I bet some places havenīt seen a tornado since ages. I also think the teal ones on the East coast would be good (too sleepy now to check the names, sorry itīs 3 AM here) Thanks for the maps, I appreciate them very much! Well it all comes down to the green card but I will keep my fingers crossed.
Texas gets a considerable amount of tornadoes and is in fact gets more tornadoes than any other state. Plus, the southeast side gets considerable amount of humidity as well as being prone to hurricanes from the Gulf of Mexico. It's also not unusual for there to be ice storms and even sometimes snow in the northern half of the state, though usually not enough to cause any prolonged accumulation of snow, AFAIK.

Honestly, earthquake aren't something you should worry about since big ones happen rarely and most cities in earthquake-prone areas have buildings designed to withstand them. Hurricanes and tornadoes are a far more common occurrence, but even then there's systems and warnings in place to let people know ahead of time when and where they will occur so they can be prepared. Plus, most tornadoes don't bear down on big cities. In the end, there's many other things to worry about.
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Old 10-29-2014, 09:37 AM
 
13,290 posts, read 17,815,040 times
Reputation: 19967
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michele87 View Post
Wha, it seems like Texas is not as hot as I thought it was during the summer. It is suitable then! I think I can get used to hot summers, if the winters are warm too. And I guess the air is dry in the west, no? I hate humid heat. The problem I had with Sofia was that the change between the seasons was too extreme for my liking and the humidity sometimes is too much despite not having any big rivers. I also dislike the rainy days here in the Netherlands, so sunny Texas sounds nice. No earthquakes, women talking with sexy (southern?) accents and I bet some places havenīt seen a tornado since ages. I also think the teal ones on the East coast would be good (too sleepy now to check the names, sorry itīs 3 AM here) Thanks for the maps, I appreciate them very much! Well it all comes down to the green card but I will keep my fingers crossed.
If you like weeks in the three digits, humid, windy in summer and single digits, blizzards, town shutting down because of weather - DFW is perfect. Google Texas earthquakes!
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Old 10-29-2014, 01:06 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,534 posts, read 17,769,225 times
Reputation: 30881
That map of natural disasters is very alarmist. I would, however avoid the West coast if you don't want to ever deal with an earthquake and Tornado alley, the biggest area of tornados on th map. Other than that, I wouldn't worry. Well, I would avoid buying property on the riverine floodplains of the upper midwest. The classification of hurricane and earthquake danger in New York and New England is way overstated.

My advice is to pick a city that you think is culturally suited to you regardless of weather or natural disaster, and since as you mention in your first post, moving is easy, narrow down your perfect place as you learn more here 'on the ground'.
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Old 10-29-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,928,628 times
Reputation: 1570
Do you have a visa? That's the first thing to take care of if you want to move to the States. All other things such as earthquakes or climate are secondary to that. Once you have a visa move where you can find a job. You can still move to your preferred location later on after you've established a career.

I don't really understand the appeal of moving often but to each his own. You can also move around Europe as often as you like and in fact, many people do.
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