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Old 11-09-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,963 posts, read 23,873,661 times
Reputation: 30800

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The ocean is great. The people around it make the place a living hell.

I've lived right on the beach. And yes, most people who live on or near the ocean have a superiority complex.
I've certainly met a few of them. One time I parked on the street near a beach entrance. I'd never been to that particular beach and I thought I'd stop for a few minutes and have a look. As I left the car, I could hear someone calling. A guy was waving and walking toward me. He started questioning me. He wanted to know if I lived in town and if that was my car. I should have told him that I'd just escaped from a detention center and the vehicle was stolen. Idiot. I answered some of his questions. I was nice. Well, not really. I gave him the Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm treatment. His name was Jim (James), he'd lived there for five months, moved there from another part of the state, enjoyed living at the beach, worked in the big city, was married, had a young son, recently bought a Lab puppy and loved driving his new BMW. "OK Jim, bye, you have a good afternoon, now." He couldn't wait to get away from me. I should have asked his shirt size.
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Old 11-09-2014, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,963 posts, read 23,873,661 times
Reputation: 30800
Quote:
Originally Posted by westernwilly View Post
I have spent a lot of time on both the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Michigan and Lake Superior and I love them all.
The ocean is not over rated but the lake are underrated.
I've never been to the beaches on the lakes. I've seen the photos posted on C-D and I must say, those are some world class beaches.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
Reputation: 2858
My response was that another plus to the Great Lakes are the public beaches are free. Most coastal states charge a fee.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Some people in the Midwest have this insane idea that people on the coasts have an agenda to make Midwesterners feel inadequate because they don't live near an ocean. It's ridiculous.

I can't help where I live (was born) and where my family all lives any more than anyone else can. What can I do? I don't look down on anyone - if people think I do because I happen to be from and live 30 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, that would be their problem.

That's great if you don't act elite but MANY people on the coasts do, and THATs insane! Most of it is simply naivete though.....I've had people ask my sister (from Mpls) if she raised pigs or other animals on "our farm", for instance.

Coastal elitism exists, like it or not.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Coastal elitism exists, like it or not.
This is a FACT.
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,534,754 times
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Default Absolutely not

The Midwest will always thrive as a region, in its quiet and unique way.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:26 PM
 
12,633 posts, read 10,483,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
My response was that another plus to the Great Lakes are the public beaches are free. Most coastal states charge a fee.
Not true, most coastal states DON'T charge for access to beaches. NJ is basically the only state that essentially universally does, minus a few beaches, but keep in mind, no beach that is maintained and taken care of is free. NJ charges a quite obvious fee, but any beach that is regularly maintained - well, the charge comes from somewhere. The money for that maintenance does not appear out of thin air.
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
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The beaches around the Great Lakes are maintained via city/county/state taxes and are open for anyone, from within the state or outside the state. There is a minor state park fee in Wisconsin (I forget - $20 annual?) for state-owned parks. And sure, there are taxes supporting the parks, but it isn't exclusive/restricted (like NJ) and is open to all. Nor is $20 (or free, or a small % of your taxes) an exorbitant fee like the private ones in NJ.

The fees you pay aren't so much for "maintenance" as they are restricting poor people from access to population-stressed shorelines. I was frankly shocked as a youngster on business trips upon learning about NJ beach protocols. Hung out with a NJ dude for a week in SoCal and we traded beach stories (he, and NJ folks in general, definitely love their beaches). The amount of money his family spent on a house, how packed in everyone was, how long it took to go anywhere, how expensive it was to belong to a good beach (a necessity for his family, as it was their favorite thing), etc. And I knew how much he made, and it was less than I was making, and he had a good-sized family. I just jump in the car and go where I feel like swimming. For free. Always have. It's far preferable.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:59 AM
 
2,025 posts, read 2,350,253 times
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Miller Beach in Gary, Indiana is free....might have to pay for parking

http://pics4.city-data.com/cpicv/vfiles22931.jpg

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/318228/thu...A-large570.jpg

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...090726abe1.jpg
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,377,878 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
The beaches around the Great Lakes are maintained via city/county/state taxes and are open for anyone, from within the state or outside the state. There is a minor state park fee in Wisconsin (I forget - $20 annual?) for state-owned parks. And sure, there are taxes supporting the parks, but it isn't exclusive/restricted (like NJ) and is open to all. Nor is $20 (or free, or a small % of your taxes) an exorbitant fee like the private ones in NJ.

The fees you pay aren't so much for "maintenance" as they are restricting poor people from access to population-stressed shorelines. I was frankly shocked as a youngster on business trips upon learning about NJ beach protocols. Hung out with a NJ dude for a week in SoCal and we traded beach stories (he, and NJ folks in general, definitely love their beaches). The amount of money his family spent on a house, how packed in everyone was, how long it took to go anywhere, how expensive it was to belong to a good beach (a necessity for his family, as it was their favorite thing), etc. And I knew how much he made, and it was less than I was making, and he had a good-sized family. I just jump in the car and go where I feel like swimming. For free. Always have. It's far preferable.
This is probably true-beaches in Atlantic City, parts of Wildwood and others are free yet Avalon, Sea Isle (where my family has a home), Stone Harbor, etc require beach tags.

They are not expensive at all though-$20 for the season per tag and you don't really need them. We always joke that we can pretend to be asleep or just go in the Ocean when the 15-16 year old "beach tag checkers" make their rounds once or twice a day. You could also just say "ahh I forgot it today". I never worry about beachtags and often will make a spontaneous drive down to the Ocean.

I agree that the cost to own a home on the Jersey Shore has gotten out of control. My parents bought their very modest beach home in 1992 for $80,000 and it is valued at nearly $400,000 today. Also, people are packed in but it does not take long to get anywhere once you are there-that is the beauty of the Jersey Shore in my opinion. Unlike Cape Cod or The Hamptons nearly everyone is in walking distance to the beach as well as bars, restaurants, etc.
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