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Old 10-28-2014, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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Alot of people from the Northeast and Midwest are moving to the South and West.
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Old 10-28-2014, 11:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaq View Post
do you think the mid west is dying out, and do you think the population will gravitate towards the east and west coasts? or will chicago soak up all of it's population? or will it remain steady
Wouldn't it have to at least start to lose population before it could even begin to die out? The midwest has gained population every year since it was first settled by immigrants a few hundred years ago.

It might not be growing as fast as out west or down south, but it's still gaining people and the economy is broadly expanding as opposed to contracting. I think a lot of the reason people get the midwest SO wrong is because they don't visit from the coasts, and only talk to the people who might have moved from the Midwest to the coasts and probably don't have glowing things to say about it - since they decided to leave. They don't visit the cities and the states in the region and see that everything is pretty much the same as it is elsewhere in the country. There might be thousands who move away every year, but there are tens of millions who are still staying put, along with thousands of new immigrants and kids born each year that keep the population increasing by a few hundred thousand every year.

Honestly most of it is doing just fine. A majority of the cities are all growing and expanding and the state economies are for the most part pretty healthy or stable. I think a lot of people's heads are stuck in the 1970's and 1980's when the industrial cities of the region were severely struggling. Even then, the cities that are struggling today make up a very small % of the population and economy of the larger region as a whole.
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
Alot of people from the Northeast and Midwest are moving to the South and West.
And an even greater number of people are replacing them.
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
Alot of people from the Northeast and Midwest are moving to the South and West.
No.

Totals for people born in the Midwest:

Kansas - 13% moved West, 15% moved South - 28% Total
North Dakota - 20% moved West, 7% moved South - 27% Total
Nebraska - 18% moved West, 9% moved South - 27% Total
South Dakota - 18% moved West, 7% moved South - 25% Total
Illinois - 9% moved West, 12% moved South - 21% Total
Indiana - 6% moved West, 14% moved South - 20% Total
Iowa - 11% moved West, 9% moved South - 20% Total
Missouri - 8% moved West, 12% moved South - 20% Total
Ohio - 6% moved West, 14% moved South - 20% Total
Michigan - 7% moved West, 12% moved South - 19% Total
Minnesota - 10% moved West, 6% moved South - 16% Total
Wisconsin - 7% moved West, 7% moved South - 14% Total

If I added the Northeast to this, the numbers would mostly go up only 1%-2%, except for Ohio, which seems to have a lot of cross-migration with Pennsylvania. Mostly though, out-migration is pretty low, except for in the Plains, where the West is right next door.

Same data for Northeast:

New York - 6% moved West, 17% moved South - 25% Total
Maryland - 5% moved West, 16% moved South - 21% Total
Maine - 8% moved West, 13% moved South - 21% Total
Rhode Island - 6% moved West, 14% moved South - 20% Total
New Jersey - 6% moved West, 15% moved South - 19% Total
Vermont - 7% moved West, 12% moved South - 19% Total
Connecticut - 6% moved West, 12% moved South - 18% Total
Delaware - 4% moved West, 13% moved South - 17% Total
Massachusetts - 6% moved West, 11% moved South - 17% Total
Pennsylvania - 5% moved West, 11% moved South - 16% Total
New Hampshire - 4% moved West, 11% moved South - 15% Total

Maryland has high out-migration rates because of the churn between it and Virginia. And all of the Northeast is somewhat boosted due to the classic retirement in Florida, meaning they need to be replaced by a constant stream of new retirees.

Regardless, there's not a single state in the Northeast or Midwest where even a third of the people born there moved out of their home region. And most of the ones which are relatively high are "borderlands" anyway.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:07 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Still sounds like a lot to me, depends on what you think "a lot" is. There's also relatively little reverse migration.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:12 PM
 
Location: USA
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Unless some supernatural Indians come and chase you out, I highly doubt it.
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Old 10-28-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,093 posts, read 13,474,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Still sounds like a lot to me, depends on what you think "a lot" is. There's also relatively little reverse migration.
Most Northern/Midwestern states are improving their numbers over time. Fewer are moving away and they're seeing greater influx from other areas. I wouldn't say there's "little reverse migration". There's a lot more than people think.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:36 PM
 
545 posts, read 815,353 times
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"Most of the Midwest remains in denial. Other regions of the world, from New England to India, know they are in global competition and are off and running. This truth is just beginning to dawn on much of the Midwest. Heavy manufacturing isn’t just in a slump: it’s going. The family farm has been replaced by the factory farm. Schools that were good enough to train workers for assembly-line jobs aren’t good enough anymore."


on why globalization is bringing down the midwest..

Caught In the Middle: An Excerpt | peoriamagazines.com
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:49 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,068,969 times
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We have more than farms and heavy manufacturing. California and Texas are the biggest agricultural states. My son-in-law is an MD in the midwest (yes, we have doctors, too), and my other daughter and husband own a multi-million dollar business, headquartered in WI, with franchises in Hawaii, Florida, North Carolina, and several other midwestern states. Not everyone works in a factory or farms. You fall for the stereotypical, gottaq, and are maybe a little provincial.
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Old 10-28-2014, 04:58 PM
 
2,200 posts, read 2,317,272 times
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Bro, definitely. It totes sux and there's like nothing to do and stuff. Everybody's like " I gotta get outta here, man". So they're pretty much all going to die or move to cool places for sure, bro. That's pretty much what everybody does, not just middle class white kids immediately after they get out of college. Everyone, like 110 percent of people just want to live in Portland and Brooklyn or also Florida and just chill, brah! No one could ever want anything else dude. Like, I can see mountains, bro! Or maybe a beach, man. That's the only thing that matters at all. Or awesome clubs, dude. Plus its way easier to move because its so flat, so like they don't even have to cross mountains or like, go on boats to get out of there man. So yeah. Pret much!
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