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Old 10-30-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,478,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Miami, Tampa, Orlando, and none of the other major cities along Florida's coast save Jacksonville assimilated into Southern culture. And thank god they didn't.

Ok. Whatever south florida is to you, it is not the North and native floridians still live there, not just people from somewhere else.

They still speak with broken English in their slang in some communities, so there is no way all of the south has totally dissolved.

 
Old 10-30-2014, 02:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Ugh, exactly what I said. You add those up and what do you have? 100,000 people? And most of the residents if Tampa at that time were Cuban, Spanish, and Italian. Working in cigar factories. Not southern.
You said that the population was "all up in the northern parts of the state" as if everything below Ocala was uninhabited. Also, many of the rural parts of the peninsula also did maintain some Southern culture at the time. Of course, places like Tampa, Key West and Miami did get some influx of immigrants (many from Cuba), but a lot of the areas outside of these centers had more Southern influence than anything.

Last edited by LordHomunculus; 10-30-2014 at 02:11 PM..
 
Old 10-30-2014, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
You said that the population was "all up in the northern parts of the state" as if everything below Ocala was uninhabited.
Which is pretty much true. Jacksonville was the NYC of Florida and dominated the state until relatively recently.

The Latin and NY/NJ influx into the rest of the state didn't really displace many people.

I remember my aunt talking about West Palm and Boca like it was nothing back in the late 70's. She said it was like living in the sticks, in some middle-of-nowhere swamp. The rich people in Palm Beach didn't even educate their kids in Florida back then, they shipped them all off to boarding schools in the Northeast.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This. Nobody does this with the Northeast.
Not true, people do this with every part of the country.

Buffalo, for example, while technically in the Northeast, shares much more in common with Detroit, Chicago and Cleveland, than with NYC, Philly, and Boston. Accents, certain words, economic base, ethnic makeup, etc. is much more Midwest (or perhaps Great Lakes would be a better identifier).

Buffalo is also geographically much closer to these Great Lakes cities than to the Northeast corridor. So Western NY State would be such an example.

Or Cincy, and St. Louis, while technically Midwest, feel "different". There's a touch of South, and a kinship with Ohio River cities, and Appalachian cities, including Pittsburgh.

Or El Paso, while in Texas, and probably technically "South" is geographically as close to LA as it is to Dallas. Many residential streets could be in Southern California, yet you're in Texas. It looks and feels like cities in CA, AZ and NM, and doesn't really resemble the major Texas cities, at all.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 04:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Which is pretty much true. Jacksonville was the NYC of Florida and dominated the state until relatively recently.

The Latin and NY/NJ influx into the rest of the state didn't really displace many people.

I remember my aunt talking about West Palm and Boca like it was nothing back in the late 70's. She said it was like living in the sticks, in some middle-of-nowhere swamp. The rich people in Palm Beach didn't even educate their kids in Florida back then, they shipped them all off to boarding schools in the Northeast.
In 1910, a total of 240,480 people (32 percent of Florida's 1910 population) lived in the 17 counties below Ocala/Marion. Was it as populated as North Florida? No. But I wouldn't consider 240k as uninhabited.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,345,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Let's just keep this forum about Louisiana....no need for us to hijack the forum anymore. Make a new thread if you want....preferably a poll
I think there should be a separate sub-board for regional debates like how City VS City got it's own sub-board in 2008 because of the amount of city VS city and state vs state topics flooding the General US board.

On topic about Louisiana, the South is a salad bowl just like the north. New York, New Jersey, Northern Ohio, and Chicago are all known for its Italian influence. New England has alot of Irish influence. Wisconsin has alot of German influence. Louisiana isn't less southern because it has more French influence than Scots-Irish influence.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,320 posts, read 2,744,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Southern states in the order of how "southern" they are:

1. Mississippi
2. Alabama
3. Georgia OR South Carolina
4. Louisiana
5. Tennessee
6. North Carolina OR Arkansas
7. Virginia
8. Kentucky
9. Florida OR Texas

Of course, only MY opinion, I'm sure this post will **** many off. Louisiana is southern and Deep South, end of story. The Deep South doesn't only consist of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, or South Carolina.
I read this article last year, which unfortunately requires a subscription that I no longer have-

Rethinking the Boundaries of the South
Christopher A. Cooper, H. Gibbs Knotts


but the authors classified the southern states in three tiers, Tier 1 being the Most Southern (or some similar phrase). Tier 1 of course included Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, the rest I don't remember.
Tier 2 contained Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, etc. Louisiana unfortunately I don't remember exactly but it was either Tier 1 or 2. Tier 3 contained Oklahoma, Virginia, and West Virginia.

If anyone has access to Project Muse perhaps they can enlighten us as to the exact details.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 06:17 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,149,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
In 1910, a total of 240,480 people (32 percent of Florida's 1910 population) lived in the 17 counties below Ocala/Marion. Was it as populated as North Florida? No. But I wouldn't consider 240k as uninhabited.
240k is nothing. Consider that Miami dare county alone today has what, nearly 3 million people living there? Even my home county , collier has more people today than all of peninsular Florida did back then.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 06:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
Your opinion is extreme tho. I've never heard someone say it is not in the south anymore just because Northerners took it over in the 1920s. If anything, most people would say south florida is sort of part of the Caribbean today.
If post people think South Florida is the Carribean, obviously they don't think it's classified with the South.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
Florida was a Spanish territory before it was English but so was Georgia and South Carolina, and that does not stop them from being in the geographical southern u.s. either.
Geography isn't the issue. If it were the issue, then Hawaii would be the most "South" U.S. state. The issue is cultural similarities.
 
Old 10-30-2014, 06:30 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,244,373 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
In 1910, a total of 240,480 people (32 percent of Florida's 1910 population) lived in the 17 counties below Ocala/Marion. Was it as populated as North Florida? No. But I wouldn't consider 240k as uninhabited.
I would consider that basically uninhabited. It's less than half the population of any U.S. state (so even Wyoming and Alaska and North Dakota are like huge urban centers compared to South Florida back then) and fewer people than even the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, which is basically wilderness.
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