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Old 11-05-2014, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
Reputation: 2896

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^ Lots of BS here. Chicago is blue. Just like Milwaukee. And Minneapolis. And Cleveland. And so on. Because it is so enormous, and the rest of the state is mostly farms, it influences elections in a way that Milwaukee (much smaller, and much smaller % of state population) cannot. This doesn't make Chicago itself "special" or different, as every large metro in the Midwest is solidly blue. The state of Illinois outside Chicago is decidedly much, much more "red" than Minnesota, Wisconsin or Iowa, for starters. Terrible theory.
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Old 11-05-2014, 12:57 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,813,094 times
Reputation: 921
A lot of people seem to want to be apart of the east coast or west coast. There's nothing wrong with being in the midwest, Chicago is obviously the Midwest and will stay the midwest. The culture in Chicago is still different them NYC, Boston, Philly, DC
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:06 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,466,747 times
Reputation: 2855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
The culture in Chicago is still different them NYC, Boston, Philly, DC
One could note the culture between Boston and Philly is also quite different. Boston is much more like Chicago than it is Miami.

The question in my mind is, is Chicago more like Des Moines or more like Boston/NY? To me it's much more like Boston/NY.

Quote:
Wrong - FIBS is because of Chicagoland tourists overrunning the northwoods. Well, the state in general. Has ZERO to do with the fact that Chicago is "more East Coast"
Perhaps we're just having a different conversation - but Wisconsinites who don't live in the northwoods still call them FIBS, and it's related to how they drive and act, not just the fact that they turn out in numbers. They drive and act more like NYers/M@ssholes than they do like someone from Cedar Rapids or Des Moines, imo.

If it were an influx of Lutherans, no one would blink.
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
Reputation: 2896
Sorry, but you're wrong. I've lived here for over 40 years and have lived in tourist areas (Door County), the 3 biggest metros (Milwaukee/Madison/Green Bay-Valley) as well as Central WI (Stevens Point/Wausau), and I'm TELLING you that it's the attitudes of vacationing Chicagoans and not that "they are a different breed" or "they are just like those darn Northeasterners!" The difference between a Chicagoan and Milwaukean is barely discernable, and being that they're so close in location to each other, they are "in the same room" quite frequently. "FIB" is something you hear with far more regularity in the northern (tourist) reaches of the state than around the more populated Milwaukee/Madison areas.

There's a reason why no one in this thread has agreed with your supposition! You don't know what you're talking about.
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,721,222 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
One could note the culture between Boston and Philly is also quite different. Boston is much more like Chicago than it is Miami.

The question in my mind is, is Chicago more like Des Moines or more like Boston/NY? To me it's much more like Boston/NY.



Perhaps we're just having a different conversation - but Wisconsinites who don't live in the northwoods still call them FIBS, and it's related to how they drive and act, not just the fact that they turn out in numbers. They drive and act more like NYers/M@ssholes than they do like someone from Cedar Rapids or Des Moines, imo.

If it were an influx of Lutherans, no one would blink.
Honestly they all drive like sh-t (people from Wisconsin and Chicago)

The stretch of 94 i live by is very nice, straight, wide road... but of course WI and IL cars manage to make the drive more chaotic than it needs to be.

like can you people just stick to one speed and not change lanes every 5 seconds?
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:51 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,813,094 times
Reputation: 921
Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
One could note the culture between Boston and Philly is also quite different. Boston is much more like Chicago than it is Miami.

The question in my mind is, is Chicago more like Des Moines or more like Boston/NY? To me it's much more like Boston/NY.



Perhaps we're just having a different conversation - but Wisconsinites who don't live in the northwoods still call them FIBS, and it's related to how they drive and act, not just the fact that they turn out in numbers. They drive and act more like NYers/M@ssholes than they do like someone from Cedar Rapids or Des Moines, imo.

If it were an influx of Lutherans, no one would blink.
That's a terrible comparison. Using miami which is predominately hispanic also that doesn't even feel like US city. Boston is in the north east.... Miami isn't so why would you even use that comparison because it's not helping your point at all. DC and Philly are more similar that Chicago and Philly. DC and Boston/NY are more similar than Chicago and Boston/NY. I'm not talking about just how fast paced or dense these cities are. I'm talking about ACTUAL culture and obvious things such as the architecture such as the rowhomes. The New Englad style delis...... The influx of Italians, Irish, Jews, etc. In the these cities lacrosse is more popular than football among the youth. I could name more but these are common similarities these cities have that Chicago doesn't posses.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:06 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,466,747 times
Reputation: 2855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
That's a terrible comparison. Using miami which is predominately hispanic also that doesn't even feel like US city. Boston is in the north east.... Miami isn't so why would you even use that comparison because it's not helping your point at all. DC and Philly are more similar that Chicago and Philly. DC and Boston/NY are more similar than Chicago and Boston/NY. I'm not talking about just how fast paced or dense these cities are. I'm talking about ACTUAL culture and obvious things such as the architecture such as the rowhomes. The New Englad style delis...... The influx of Italians, Irish, Jews, etc. In the these cities lacrosse is more popular than football among the youth. I could name more but these are common similarities these cities have that Chicago doesn't posses.

I'll concede the Miami point. But otherwise I've lived in both Boston and Chicago, and in many ways I find them quite similar, excluding the accents.

We can certainly agree to disagree.
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Old 11-05-2014, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,907 posts, read 6,542,365 times
Reputation: 5372
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Sorry, but you're wrong. I've lived here for over 40 years and have lived in tourist areas (Door County), the 3 biggest metros (Milwaukee/Madison/Green Bay-Valley) as well as Central WI (Stevens Point/Wausau), and I'm TELLING you that it's the attitudes of vacationing Chicagoans and not that "they are a different breed" or "they are just like those darn Northeasterners!" The difference between a Chicagoan and Milwaukean is barely discernable, and being that they're so close in location to each other, they are "in the same room" quite frequently. "FIB" is something you hear with far more regularity in the northern (tourist) reaches of the state than around the more populated Milwaukee/Madison areas.

There's a reason why no one in this thread has agreed with your supposition! You don't know what you're talking about.
well, i can't return the "You don't know what you're talking about" to you, cheese plate since what i offered was an opinion, a paradigm, and one that i went out of the way of saying that plenty can disagree with. you disagreed. and your point was valid...you expressed see things in a different light. that hardly would suggest you don't know what you are talking about to me.

i don't offer what i am saying as a competition. i merely share. and i merely asked if others saw it the way i did. some said they did. many, far more indeed, disagreed.

it's just dialogue, cheese plate. and, to me, it's just sharing what we think and respecting each other's points of view. there is absolutely nothing i said that was the least bit "provable" in any way...it's just a frame of reference.

have a nice day.
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Old 11-07-2014, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,907 posts, read 6,542,365 times
Reputation: 5372
I'd like to add just one more point to what appeared to be (and should be) a dead thread. The very notion of "coastal" as descriptive for areas in the northeast and the west coast coast denotes commonality in places that are diverse and far apart. In no way does it negate those incredible differences and in no way does it dismiss the very real concept of regionalism.

as noted, New York is very northeast and San Francisco is very coastal California. But that doesn't prevent us from viewing them in a different filter.

I made the assumption that Chicago functions with these regions in their shared commonality. Such an observation has nothing to do with the very true and correct and very strong idea that Chicago is very midwestern. It is.

Now you can argue with the assessment that Chicago does function like the far flung bi-coastal regions. And you can certainly argue that other places in the United States between the Atlantic and Pacific are very much aligned with those two coastal strips. You can, in fact, make compelling arguments on both of these.

But I think I have made a fair argument here with supportive detail as to why I made my assertion. I have explained why these three diverse and removed from each other areas in the US have a commonality, a commonality that at times skips Chicago from the other two, but IMHO should not (and, yes, I have heard others make the same assertions about the northeast/west coast/Chicago as I have; I hardly invented the idea).

Again....this is hardly better/worse, greater/lesser. It is merely how places orient themselves. There is no hierarchy suggested in what I write.

as I began this post, I'll finish it by saying I am more than comfortable to see this thread die. I just posted this because of my need to get across that there was a lot people thought I was saying here that I was not at all saying. Diverse regions are regions apart and have their own identity; that does not prevent us from grouping them together based on commonalities and generalizations they share.
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