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View Poll Results: If there was a new area code introduced in your area, would you prefer a split or overlay?
Area code split 2 20.00%
Area code overlay 8 80.00%
Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 11-02-2014, 02:49 PM
 
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I've seen some of the local forums debate new area codes, or area code overlays. I was wondering what people prefer if a new area code is deemed necessary in your area. The last area code split in the U.S. was back in October 2007, when area code 575 was split from area code 505 in New Mexico.

I was also wondering if any of you live or visit any place that still has its original area code. A challenge if you're in an urban area.
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Old 11-02-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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I have the same area code as 30 years ago. Part of that is due to the number I have, some of us kept it and others were split off around 1992. Prior to then all of MD had the same area code, 301.

Since then a couple more codes have been applied as overlays, due mostly to the explosion of cell phones.

Where I'm from in PA still has the 814 area code.
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Old 11-02-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,434,710 times
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Don't want to change. Have the same area code that's been in place since 1957, and...very odd factoid...it's also shared with the Marshall Islands (Micronesia) in the Pacific!

Area code 805 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 11-03-2014, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 676,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swbrotha100 View Post
I've seen some of the local forums debate new area codes, or area code overlays. I was wondering what people prefer if a new area code is deemed necessary in your area. The last area code split in the U.S. was back in October 2007, when area code 575 was split from area code 505 in New Mexico.

I was also wondering if any of you live or visit any place that still has its original area code. A challenge if you're in an urban area
.
I read an article years ago about splits and overlays that said capital cities of states tend to keep the original area codes due to the government center there. I know it is the case with cities like Austin, Denver, Salt Lake City, Little Rock, Atlanta, and I'm sure many others.

As far as the preference between overlays and splits, I don't think it matters that much anymore. With cell phones, you program the number in and never actually dial it for nearly every phone call we make. Even for numbers that I don't have programmed, like when I'm calling a business, I still don't have to enter the number. I search for the business info on my phone and then just dial the number directly from their website listing. It's very rare that I need to enter numbers to call.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I have had the same area code my entire life (51 years), for many phone numbers and residences in different cities/towns, despite living in one of the fastest-growing areas of the US (Raleigh, NC). Of course, the area code itself has shrunk over the years (from 2/3 of the state to less than 1/6, geographically) but I've always fallen within it (good thing about being in a Capital City), and we are said to be set up for an overlay, but I don't know anyone with the overlay code, and I will FIGHT if I ever have to change numbers and get the overlay code.

Quote:
I read an article years ago about splits and overlays that said capital cities of states tend to keep the original area codes due to the government center there. I know it is the case with cities like Austin, Denver, Salt Lake City, Little Rock, Atlanta, and I'm sure many others.
Yes, it would be a big pain to have to change all of those government phone numbers people are used to. And actually every large city keeps its original area code; the territory just shrinks, usually to the "downtown" area (think of LA, which used to be all 213; now it's only the immediate downtown area that is. Ditto with NYC and 212, Chicago with 312, etc).

I have always been fascinated by area codes and there is an amazing page on them at LinkMAD. Here is the original area code map when they were first invented. Note that Florida only had ONE area code (and Iowa had 3!).

Trivia fact: many over the age of 40 or so knew that until the 1990s, area codes always had a 1 or a 0 as the middle digit. Only when they ran out of combinations that fit that pattern, did they have to add new codes, which required a major change with the phone-switching equipment.

Originally, states with only one code all had a 0 as the middle digit while states with more than one had a 1. And, the largest cities got the smallest-numbered codes (not counting 0 as "small"--remember, this was on rotary phones where 0 took the longest to dial). So 212 = NYC, 213 = LA, 312 = Chicago, and 313 = Detroit which was the 4th-largest city at the time, because those were the fastest codes to dial. Other larger cities got shorter codes (Dallas, 214) but going past 313 it's not quite so lined-up.

Last edited by Francois; 11-05-2014 at 04:01 PM..
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Old 11-07-2014, 08:17 PM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,539,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swbrotha100 View Post
I was also wondering if any of you live or visit any place that still has its original area code. A challenge if you're in an urban area.
A year ago I moved from New York City -- home to the original 212, plus 718, 646, 917, 347 and the newest, 929 -- to Rhode Island, where all we've ever had is 401. According to Wikipedia, Rhody is not projected to need a new area code until 2033. I liked the idea of living in the smallest state and I like having one area code -- and the fact that many businesses don't include the area code when they list their phone number reminds me of my childhood!

As an aside, I happen to be one of the very few people in the entire world to have a cell phone with the prestigious 212 area code. I used to live in Manhattan, where I lucked into getting a 212 number when almost everybody was being issued the then-new 646. Then I signed up for Vonage and ported my number there, but it was also new and buggy at the time and I didn't like it, so I ended up getting my first cell phone and porting my 212 number to it from Vonage. That led to a lot of confusion when I gave people my number, especially after I moved to 718 territory ("You know we don't deliver to Manhattan, right?") -- 212 has never been issued to cell phones, and I don't believe I could have ported the 212 number directly from a landline to a cell phone. Nobody's raised an eyebrow since I left the state entirely, though.

I'm sure they must exist, but I have never encountered a single person besides me with a 212 cell-phone number.
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Old 11-07-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,416,312 times
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I prefer splits to overlays, as splits keep some sort of geography intact.

When I moved to Denver, I insisted on having a (303). Other people in my household have (720)'s.
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Old 11-07-2014, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,631,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post

Trivia fact: many over the age of 40 or so knew that until the 1990s, area codes always had a 1 or a 0 as the middle digit. Only when they ran out of combinations that fit that pattern, did they have to add new codes, which required a major change with the phone-switching equipment.

Originally, states with only one code all had a 0 as the middle digit while states with more than one had a 1. And, the largest cities got the smallest-numbered codes (not counting 0 as "small"--remember, this was on rotary phones where 0 took the longest to dial). So 212 = NYC, 213 = LA, 312 = Chicago, and 313 = Detroit which was the 4th-largest city at the time, because those were the fastest codes to dial. Other larger cities got shorter codes (Dallas, 214) but going past 313 it's not quite so lined-up.
I over 40 and am very well aware of some of the peculiarities of the numbering of phone numbers. I believe that there was also some numbering restrictions on the prefix of the phone number.
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Old 11-07-2014, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,152,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
A year ago I moved from New York City -- home to the original 212, plus 718, 646, 917, 347 and the newest, 929 -- to Rhode Island, where all we've ever had is 401. According to Wikipedia, Rhody is not projected to need a new area code until 2033. I liked the idea of living in the smallest state and I like having one area code -- and the fact that many businesses don't include the area code when they list their phone number reminds me of my childhood!

As an aside, I happen to be one of the very few people in the entire world to have a cell phone with the prestigious 212 area code. I used to live in Manhattan, where I lucked into getting a 212 number when almost everybody was being issued the then-new 646. Then I signed up for Vonage and ported my number there, but it was also new and buggy at the time and I didn't like it, so I ended up getting my first cell phone and porting my 212 number to it from Vonage. That led to a lot of confusion when I gave people my number, especially after I moved to 718 territory ("You know we don't deliver to Manhattan, right?") -- 212 has never been issued to cell phones, and I don't believe I could have ported the 212 number directly from a landline to a cell phone. Nobody's raised an eyebrow since I left the state entirely, though.

I'm sure they must exist, but I have never encountered a single person besides me with a 212 cell-phone number.
Heck we don't even have 212 numbers on our landlines at work. All our landlines are 646 and all our company cell phones are 917.
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Old 11-07-2014, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 676,076 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
A year ago I moved from New York City -- home to the original 212, plus 718, 646, 917, 347 and the newest, 929 -- to Rhode Island, where all we've ever had is 401. According to Wikipedia, Rhody is not projected to need a new area code until 2033. I liked the idea of living in the smallest state and I like having one area code -- and the fact that many businesses don't include the area code when they list their phone number reminds me of my childhood!

As an aside, I happen to be one of the very few people in the entire world to have a cell phone with the prestigious 212 area code. I used to live in Manhattan, where I lucked into getting a 212 number when almost everybody was being issued the then-new 646. Then I signed up for Vonage and ported my number there, but it was also new and buggy at the time and I didn't like it, so I ended up getting my first cell phone and porting my 212 number to it from Vonage. That led to a lot of confusion when I gave people my number, especially after I moved to 718 territory ("You know we don't deliver to Manhattan, right?") -- 212 has never been issued to cell phones, and I don't believe I could have ported the 212 number directly from a landline to a cell phone. Nobody's raised an eyebrow since I left the state entirely, though.

I'm sure they must exist, but I have never encountered a single person besides me with a 212 cell-phone number.
I never realized anyone considered an area code prestigious.
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