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Old 11-02-2014, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Michissippi
3,116 posts, read 7,163,281 times
Reputation: 2055

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CravingMountains View Post
Of the 16 states with the lowest unemployment rates, 11 of them are states that are fully in the Great Plains (North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma), partially in the Great Plains (Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Texas). Also of note are Minnesota and Iowa. I'm not sure if these places are partially in the Great Plains? I have never been to them..... But I have read on this forum and elsewhere that the western parts of these states are basically the Great plains.

So what gives?

So what are these states doing differently that the states with bad economies need to copy?
Those states tend to have lower populations and lack the large urban cities where poverty concentrates. Also, they have agricultural economies and the worldwide demand for food has only increased. (We're also burning lots of corn for fuel by mixing it with gasoline.) Some of the states have oil, and oil drilling combined with a low population is going to result in higher economic benefit per capita in those states.

I'm not sure there's much other states can copy aside from magically increasing the amount of arable farmland or magically having oil and natural gas appear under the ground. For decades people left those great plains states to go to larger cities, but now the economic tables have turned a little bit.
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Old 11-02-2014, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,832,710 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
No. Colorado and Minnesota are the only partially Plains states that people actually WANT to move to, especially young people because they have "hip", progressive highly educated cities (Denver and Minneapolis).
Hip is a death sentence. The fad is over.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
The rest of the Great Plains? They have a low unemployment rate, because for the most part they are more than nearly any other region of the country that you have to pay people to stay or to move to. If people would rather live somewhere else, this will have an effect on the employment rate.

The only people left in Kansas outside Lawrence, Overland Park, and Wichita are those who run the combines. In North Dakota you have people moving for the backbreaking work in the oil fields in some of the harshest climate in the lower 48.

People do move to liberal states, because they are states that are enjoyable to live in, and people are willing to ride out periods of unemployment, or even to move without a solid job, thus bumping up the unemployment rate.

Yes, that is why Eastern Pa is being flooded with transplants from NYC and NJ.
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Old 11-02-2014, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,058,698 times
Reputation: 3925
Another factor is that people and businesses in this part of the country tend to be more conservative with their finances. Because of this, there wasn't much of a real estate bubble outside of Minneapolis and Denver (and those cities had smaller bubbles than on the coast). When the financial crisis hit, the region was largely shielded from its primary effects.
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Old 11-03-2014, 06:52 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,017 posts, read 102,674,652 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhaalspawn View Post
Those states tend to have lower populations and lack the large urban cities where poverty concentrates. Also, they have agricultural economies and the worldwide demand for food has only increased. (We're also burning lots of corn for fuel by mixing it with gasoline.) Some of the states have oil, and oil drilling combined with a low population is going to result in higher economic benefit per capita in those states.

I'm not sure there's much other states can copy aside from magically increasing the amount of arable farmland or magically having oil and natural gas appear under the ground. For decades people left those great plains states to go to larger cities, but now the economic tables have turned a little bit.
You've apparently never been to Denver, Minneapolis/St. Paul, or even Omaha. Denver's economy is not ag-based.
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:13 AM
 
5,837 posts, read 10,796,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Hip is a death sentence. The fad is over.

Yes, that is why Eastern Pa is being flooded with transplants from NYC and NJ.
Granted my post used a little ignorants language and rhetoric, but so is "nanny state". Any explanation for differences in economy between two places that use that term, I can not take seriously.

Anyways, the reasons are what others have said:

No large cities where poverty concentrates.
No desirable, charged real estate leading to a real estate boom which inevitable leads to a real estate bust (look for where people want to live, and in the Plains that is Denver and Minneapolis).

There will ALWAYS be demand for wheat and corn, and these states are overwhelmingly blanketed with these grain crops.
Anywhere with oil/fossil fuels and a lot population = virtual non existent unemployment.
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,403,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Hip is a death sentence. The fad is over.
Being designated "hip" is a money tree, straight-up.
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,403 posts, read 59,899,964 times
Reputation: 54053
Outs there a reason they shouldn't be?
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:54 AM
 
11,179 posts, read 22,394,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You've apparently never been to Denver, Minneapolis/St. Paul, or even Omaha. Denver's economy is not ag-based.
Or even Iowa. Agriculture and agriculture related manufacturing are responsible for 10% of Iowa's total jobs. The Des Moines and Iowa City-Cedar Rapids areas are responsible for 90% of the state's 100,000 jobs created over the past 10 years. The unemployment rate in those metros is between 3.3% and 4.9%. Those two areas have grown by 175,000 people since 1990 and have represented almost all of the economic and population growth of the state.

Agriculture/livestock contributes 3.5% towards Iowa's economy as a whole. It's overshaded by the huge insurance industry in Des Moines alone nearly three-fold as far as economic output.
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Old 11-08-2014, 10:43 PM
 
363 posts, read 618,768 times
Reputation: 281
Living out in the middle of rural Nebraska, the reason that I think we have a low unemployment rate is because most young people move out of the rural areas and those that stay already have work. The only areas in Nebraska that area growing without hispanic immigration are Omaha and Lincoln. So in rural Nebraska its because of the brain drain.

Now as for Omaha and Lincoln, these are cities that actually have a lot of decent jobs and pretty much keep the state from losing population overall. In rural nebraska you're pretty much limited to ag jobs or manufacturing jobs related to ag
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Old 11-09-2014, 12:14 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,724,485 times
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They have agricultural and mineral, namely oil, wealth. Nothing to do with them being uber-capitalist. South Dakota for example has a terrible poverty problem on its reservations.
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