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Old 11-08-2014, 07:45 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
550 posts, read 569,760 times
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To live? To visit?
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Old 11-10-2014, 05:37 AM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
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I find Massachusetts more appealing with Boston of course as well as the many historic towns, the Cape, farmland and mountains. Connecticut has much of the same but in my opinion they aren't as desirable beginning with the Boston-Hartford comparison as well as the coastal areas.
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:10 AM
 
1,008 posts, read 1,119,287 times
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Massachusetts. CT is too in the sphere of "the city"
for my tastes and needs.
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
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I like both, but I prefer Connecticut, other than the southwestern section. CT is more laid back, more rural, and seems "cleaner" with regard to infrastructure. I also like Massachusetts, but only central and western MA. I don't like the Boston area. Too crowded and expensive. CT also has warmer, longer summers. Hartford is the warmest city in New England, with temps averaging highs of 86 degrees with high 70% humidity during the summer, which I like. Connecticut also has a more centralized layout (Hartford area), whereas in Massachusetts, everything is skewed toward Boston.
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Old 11-10-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,384,130 times
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CT... less people.
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Old 11-10-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,313,139 times
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Massachusetts, even with Boston out of the equation. Both states have a lot of similarities but Massachusetts has a much more attractive shoreline with places like Cape Cod National Seashore, the Islands, and a larger collection of interesting and historic coastal towns. In Western Mass the hills get a bit bigger and the rural and bucolic charm of the Berkshires cover a bigger area than what CT offers.

Connecticut has nice pockets of New England charm, affluent areas, and beautiful rolling hills. However, Connecticut's cities leave a lot to be desired. Hartford is a workaday city with a sterile 9-5 downtown and surrounding neighborhoods that are very rough around the edges. New Haven is ok, though being host to a university as prestigious as Yale, one would have higher expectations of it. New Haven also has neighborhoods riddled with high crime rates. Bridgeport and Waterbury have similar issues with a high rate of urban poverty and affluent suburbs on the periphery.

Overall Massachusetts is more appealing as a destination with a host of beaches, scenic rural areas, coastal harbors, and more interesting cities, and Connecticut is simply more residential.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 11-10-2014 at 10:05 AM..
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:06 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,313,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
CT... less people.
If you've been to either of these states you likely wouldn't notice a very discernible difference in terms of having more or less people. Yes CT has less in raw numbers, well because its substantially smaller in land area. Both states have a fairly high density of population per capita. And if you've ever been in a Connecticut traffic jam, less people would be that last thing coming to mind. That stretch of I-95 between New Haven and Greenwich must exist in hell. Boston may be substantially larger than any CT city but in the bigger picture, both states have a fairly similar range of urban, suburban, and rural areas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I like both, but I prefer Connecticut, other than the southwestern section. CT is more laid back, more rural, and seems "cleaner" with regard to infrastructure.
I'm not sure I'm following. I don't see Connecticut as any more rural than Massachusetts, especially with Western Mass in the picture. I can't think of any place in Connecticut that would be any more laid back than Cape Cod or the Berkshires. I certainly don't see any cities in Connecticut as comparatively "cleaner" than Massachusetts.

Granted Massachusetts has terrible highway infrastructure all over, and Connecticut does a handful of nice highways (I-91, hwy 8, Merritt Parkway) but compared with most other states, Connecticut has terrible highway infrastructure as well. Why on earth did they design I-84 west of Hartford with multiple left exits? I-84 is also short on lanes with a lot of bottenecks on that stretch, and I-95 in FFC has only six lanes which was outdated back in the 80's. Both I-84 and I-95 have a ridiculous amount of congestion.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 11-10-2014 at 10:32 AM..
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Old 11-10-2014, 12:19 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,298 times
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As an Italian-American who grew up in RI, I actually prefer CT to MA because of its larger Italian-American influence. Compared to CT, MA has a much larger Irish-American population and, in turn, a much stronger Irish-American influence. Despite being one 1/4 Irish by heritage, I don't identify with Irish-Americans or their culture at all. Neither does my mother, who is 1/2 Irish and 1/2 Italian.

The Irish-American influence in the Boston area in particular is very pervasive--Hell, even the Boston's NBA team is named the "Celtics"--and I simply can't identify with the general laziness and apathy of that community in the Boston area--and Eastern New England in general, for that matter--and all of the associated biases of their community, including: very strong union affiliation and support, a culture of heavy drinking/alcoholism, disinterest in upward economic and social mobility, blind Democratic voting trends, strong and vocal opinions of other ethnics groups (esp. English, Italian, Jewish, and African-Americans), a general trend towards sociocultural inclusiveness (i.e., Irish people only associate with other Irish people), and so forth.

Growing up in Providence, RI and attending Roman Catholic schools for my K-12 education, I've certainly had my fill of this subset of American culture. I mean, some of the things my Irish-Americans classmates would say about Italian-Americans and other ethnic groups would make my mouth drop, even as a child. I was subject to lots of hurtful comments as a child growing up from Irish-American classmates, their parents, teachers, and even family members, many of which were said in an outright manner. That's why my Mom never affiliated herself with her Irish side of the family--she's well-educated, a successful sole proprietor, seldom drinks alcohol, and has never received a single entitlement whatsoever. Can't say the same for the majority of her Irish kin.

Furthermore, people in CT are less ornery overall than people in MA as well as RI. By the time you hit Stonington along the CT coast and, further north, Vernon or Manchester, the Eastern New England accents disappear as do the ornery working-class demeanors that go hand-in-hand with the ENE accents. Not to mention that people in CT are more soften-spoken and less assertive than people in MA, at least Eastern MA.

Although Western MA is very beautiful and has a slightly more pleasant culture than that of Eastern MA, despite having a lot of English-American Protestants who turn their noses up at more heavily Catholic ethnic groups, it's even colder and snowier than CT (a major con in my book). Also, Western MA has more of a lackluster economy than CT, which is why lots of folks in Western MA commute to the Hartford area for work. I was reading an article recently that described MA as Boston plus "six or seven Providences" (Pittsfield, Springfield, Worcester, Fall River, New Bedford, et al.), indicating that the economy of much of MA outside of the Boston metro really leaves much to be desired and has for decades since the departure of of the manufacturing industry as well as these cities' apprehension or plain inability to subsequently diversify their economies and attract new industry.

Finally, I think CT's proximity to NYC makes it better connected to the US and, in turn, a little more mainstream than most, if not all of the rest of New England, including the Boston area, which for a major metro area is surprisingly insular.

That's my $0.02.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:00 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,716,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
As an Italian-American who grew up in RI, I actually prefer CT to MA because of its larger Italian-American influence.
I increasingly get the impression from certain New Englanders who like to dismiss CT that 'Too much NY influence = Too many Italians'.

Personally I like both states for a multitude of reasons. I give the edge to CT becuase it is a bit less provincial. There is a certain hyper-nationalist strain in Mass that will act obnoxious to you when it is discovered you are not from Massachussetts.

Granted this exists in all states, but in Mass it is fairly prevalent, especially the eastern part of the state. Woe is to Nutmeggers and Knickerbockers who thought they could get away with visiting Boston (much less live there) without feeling like they are barely tolerated by a certain segment of the population. Not everyone, mind you. I have made good friends from Mass, but sometimes...
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
As an Italian-American who grew up in RI, I actually prefer CT to MA because of its larger Italian-American influence. Compared to CT, MA has a much larger Irish-American population and, in turn, a much stronger Irish-American influence. Despite being one 1/4 Irish by heritage, I don't identify with Irish-Americans or their culture at all. Neither does my mother, who is 1/2 Irish and 1/2 Italian.

The Irish-American influence in the Boston area in particular is very pervasive--Hell, even the Boston's NBA team is named the "Celtics"--and I simply can't identify with the general laziness and apathy of that community in the Boston area--and Eastern New England in general, for that matter--and all of the associated biases of their community, including: very strong union affiliation and support, a culture of heavy drinking/alcoholism, disinterest in upward economic and social mobility, blind Democratic voting trends, strong and vocal opinions of other ethnics groups (esp. English, Italian, Jewish, and African-Americans), a general trend towards sociocultural inclusiveness (i.e., Irish people only associate with other Irish people), and so forth.

Growing up in Providence, RI and attending Roman Catholic schools for my K-12 education, I've certainly had my fill of this subset of American culture. I mean, some of the things my Irish-Americans classmates would say about Italian-Americans and other ethnic groups would make my mouth drop, even as a child. I was subject to lots of hurtful comments as a child growing up from Irish-American classmates, their parents, teachers, and even family members, many of which were said in an outright manner. That's why my Mom never affiliated herself with her Irish side of the family--she's well-educated, a successful sole proprietor, seldom drinks alcohol, and has never received a single entitlement whatsoever. Can't say the same for the majority of her Irish kin.

Furthermore, people in CT are less ornery overall than people in MA as well as RI. By the time you hit Stonington along the CT coast and, further north, Vernon or Manchester, the Eastern New England accents disappear as do the ornery working-class demeanors that go hand-in-hand with the ENE accents. Not to mention that people in CT are more soften-spoken and less assertive than people in MA, at least Eastern MA.

Although Western MA is very beautiful and has a slightly more pleasant culture than that of Eastern MA, despite having a lot of English-American Protestants who turn their noses up at more heavily Catholic ethnic groups, it's even colder and snowier than CT (a major con in my book). Also, Western MA has more of a lackluster economy than CT, which is why lots of folks in Western MA commute to the Hartford area for work. I was reading an article recently that described MA as Boston plus "six or seven Providences" (Pittsfield, Springfield, Worcester, Fall River, New Bedford, et al.), indicating that the economy of much of MA outside of the Boston metro really leaves much to be desired and has for decades since the departure of of the manufacturing industry as well as these cities' apprehension or plain inability to subsequently diversify their economies and attract new industry.

Finally, I think CT's proximity to NYC makes it better connected to the US and, in turn, a little more mainstream than most, if not all of the rest of New England, including the Boston area, which for a major metro area is surprisingly insular.

That's my $0.02.
This is quite accurate. Especially the thing about eastern MA people being more brash. Central/eastern CT people are more pleasant to be around. CT also has a better climate.
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